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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

Elise Ferer

To describe how a personal librarian program at a large university developed, has evolved, and continues to function. This paper aims to assist other librarians in…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe how a personal librarian program at a large university developed, has evolved, and continues to function. This paper aims to assist other librarians in developing their own personal librarian programs. It will also assist librarians who are working to connect to students.

Design/methodology/approach

To produce this paper, internal documents were reviewed, existing data were investigated, those who assisted in the development of the program were consulted and literature on personal librarian programs was reviewed.

Findings

Personal librarian programs can be an efficient way to connect to students and can create awareness about library services, especially without a formal orientation for new students. The personal librarian program discussed here connects the library to a large number of students with little time and effort. Planning is important in developing a working program.

Practical implications

Librarians can use this article to understand how a personal librarians program functions and how it can benefit their libraries. The paper emphasizes revising an existing program to work more effectively and using planning documents and assessment to help an outreach program run smoothly.

Originality/value

This paper details how a personal librarian program was developed and has evolved as well as how the program functions. The value is in the ways in which the program has been revised and has evolved and in the role that planning has taken in creating an effective program.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Amanda MacDonald and Suchi Mohanty

This paper aims to address the emergence of personal librarian programs and to discuss the development and implementation of the Personal Librarian for Transfer Students…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the emergence of personal librarian programs and to discuss the development and implementation of the Personal Librarian for Transfer Students Program at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH).

Design/methodology/approach

The literature is limited to research focused on personal librarians and programs. This paper examines the process by which the program was established at UNC-CH and includes a discussion about how campus and library buy-in was secured.

Findings

The response to the program has been positive. Survey responses and anecdotal feedback shows that the program resonates with a select group of transfer students.

Originality/value

This research provides an overview of an effective, sustainable way to forge personal connections with transfer students to support their academic development.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Helene Lafrance and Shannon B. Kealey

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the planning, implementation and assessment of a personal librarian (PL) program for transfer students at a four-year private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the planning, implementation and assessment of a personal librarian (PL) program for transfer students at a four-year private university. It highlights best practices to ensure the success of such a program, emphasizes the importance of collaboration with other campus units and explores the possible applications for other underserved student populations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains why the PL model is particularly appropriate to serve the needs of transfer students. It clearly describes the assessment methods to evaluate such a program and proposes best practices to ensure success and sustainability.

Findings

Transfer students respond very positively to a PL program as shown by the number of interactions they have with their PLs and their responses to a survey. Librarians also appreciate the chance to develop meaningful relationships with students despite the addition to their workload.

Practical implications

Institutions looking at ways to reach out to transfer students or other underserved populations can easily adapt the PL program described here.

Originality/value

The PL concept is not new but, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, it is the first time it has been applied to transfer students. The program described here is also unique because of its “boutique” approach, which emphasizes customization and personalization.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

It introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2014.

Findings

It provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

E.G. Sieverts, M. Hofstede, G. Lobbestael, B. Oude Groeniger, F. Provost and P. Šikovà

In this article, the fifth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of seven programs are presented and various properties…

Abstract

In this article, the fifth in a series on microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval, test results of seven programs are presented and various properties and qualities of these programs are discussed. In this instalment of the series we discuss programs for information storage and retrieval which are primarily characterised by the properties of personal information managers (PIMs), hypertext programs, or best match and ranking retrieval systems. The programs reviewed in this issue are the personal information managers 3by5/RediReference, askSam, Dayflo Tracker, and Ize; Personal Librarian uses best match and ranking; the hypertext programs are Folio Views and the HyperKRS/HyperCard combination (askSam, Ize and Personal Librarian boast hypertext features as well). HyperKRS/HyperCard is only available for the Apple Macintosh. All other programs run under MS‐DOS; versions of Personal Librarian also run under Windows and some other systems. For each of the seven programs about 100 facts and test results are tabulated. The programs are also discussed individually.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Tessa Withorn, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Jillian Eslami, Anthony Andora, Maggie Clarke, Nicole Patch, Karla Salinas Guajardo and Syann Lunsford

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2018.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 422 sources, and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and anyone interested as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2018

James Cho

This paper aims to convey the experiences of an academic librarian in providing services to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) so that it may aide other…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to convey the experiences of an academic librarian in providing services to students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) so that it may aide other librarians who also work with these students.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper does this by detailing a support program, the Bridges to Adelphi Program, for students on the spectrum and illustrates the nature of the disorder, strategies that have been used in working with these students and reflections on and implications of these strategies.

Finding

This paper provides information on practical strategies used and in detail descriptions of this work and conveys findings on which strategies are used and why and which strategies succeeded and which did not.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this paper is that other universities may not have a well-organized and well-developed support program such as the Bridges to Adelphi Program. However, it does provide advice on working with students on the spectrum even in the absence of such a program. Future avenues for research include the collection and evaluation of data on learning outcomes that these techniques have on students with ASD.

Practical implications

The specific librarian interventions detailed in this paper will provide advice and models that other librarians can use.

Originality/value

This paper is distinguished from other scholarship in that it is addressed to the librarian and not teaching faculty, and in the small amount of literature that is addressed to the librarian, this paper differs in that it does not solely offer suggestions but provides a real-world accounting of strategies and interventions used.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Colleen S. Harris

The purpose of this paper is to ask how the academic library may better position itself to assist with the demonstrated need for improved research ability in doctoral…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask how the academic library may better position itself to assist with the demonstrated need for improved research ability in doctoral students. The paper examines the literature on doctoral student retention, which demonstrates problems with research self‐efficacy in students, and connects this issue to the library literature demonstrating the impact of library instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

The main approach is the review of the literatures in library science on the impact of instruction, and in the wider education literature on student retention and doctoral student attrition.

Findings

It was found that library instruction does demonstrably improve student research skills, and that doctoral students are generally underprepared to conduct dissertation level research. There is a case for partnering doctoral students with academic librarians to improve dissertation completion rates and lower attrition due to lack of research skill.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates an obvious need for focus of library instruction on graduate students, and doctoral students in particular. The paper poses a number of research agendas that can be taken up by practitioners in the field, including various models for implementing instruction for doctoral students.

Social implications

Attrition from doctoral programs has a burdensome impact on academic institutions, and has been demonstrated to have adverse social, psychological and financial impacts on the doctoral students themselves. The ability of library intervention to alleviate the problem has wide‐ranging implications.

Originality/value

The paper brings a wider literature base to bear on the practice of library instruction, and raises important questions relevant to librarians and graduate faculty about the value of the library to more advanced research students and the current focus of most library instruction programs at the undergraduate levels.

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Cynthia L. Henry, Kimberly K. Vardeman and Carrye K. Syma

This paper aims to highlight how librarians at Texas Tech University Libraries are thinking outside the box. Librarians launched services in a number of directions by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight how librarians at Texas Tech University Libraries are thinking outside the box. Librarians launched services in a number of directions by creating new service points through videos, QR code signs, and roving reference. Personal librarians use videos to introduce themselves, allowing the patron to relate to the librarian on a personal level. Signs with QR codes are posted in areas of the library to assist patrons in locating materials, rooms, or services. Roving reference allows librarians to step out of the library, meeting patrons' needs across campus.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature is limited on libraries utilizing videos to promote librarians and roving reference. This paper examines in detail services deployed in the last two years at Texas Tech University Libraries.

Findings

The reaction to these services has been mixed. Students responded that videos and roving reference have a personal touch and meet patrons at their point of need. Students have not adopted the QR code technology.

Research limitations/implications

Unfortunately, these new services do not have long‐term statistics to evaluate.

Practical implications

The paper acts as a guide to implementing marketing in academic libraries, QR codes, and reference services off the desk. Other libraries can implement the services described.

Originality/value

The novelty of this research is the creative way the librarians approached the needs of the patrons.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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