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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Elizabeth Nelson

This literature review aims to look at the unique role of community colleges as they address the information literacy needs of their students, who are by nature…

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Abstract

Purpose

This literature review aims to look at the unique role of community colleges as they address the information literacy needs of their students, who are by nature continuously in transition to and from the institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Library science databases and online sources were reviewed for relevant information.

Findings

Community colleges are addressing the needs of their various student populations in a variety of ways.

Originality/value

The role of the community college library is underrepresented in the literature. This review provides more information about the unique role that community colleges fill in the higher education ecosystem.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2012

Tanom Intarakumnerd

This practitioner's chapter presents a “how-to” approach to establishing a college system that is decentralized and rooted in local communities, using the Thai system as…

Abstract

This practitioner's chapter presents a “how-to” approach to establishing a college system that is decentralized and rooted in local communities, using the Thai system as an example. The Thai system “borrowed” programs from US community colleges – offering associate degrees, certificate programs, continuing education programs, and remedial education. While the author presents clear challenges that these institutions face, he is optimistic that the community college system is a positive aspect of the Thai higher education system.

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Community Colleges Worldwide: Investigating the Global Phenomenon
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-230-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1973

FJ Speckeen

Community colleges are distinctive types of institutions and should not be looked upon as an extension of the high school nor as the lower years of a university. They are…

Abstract

Community colleges are distinctive types of institutions and should not be looked upon as an extension of the high school nor as the lower years of a university. They are institutions in their own right with a special sensitivity to local needs. Local autonomy is critical to the development of the community colleges. A special emphasis is placed on practical experience in employing faculty members. The emphasis in these colleges is on teaching, not on research. Technical‐vocational programmes are recommended, supported and evaluated, by Advisory Committees of knowledgeable and highly interested laymen. University transfer courses are offered after close consultation with the universities. Adult Education (Extension) is a major emphasis of community colleges, with colleges operating at all hours of the day and week in order to meet local needs and interests. The community colleges stress the open door policy whereby mature students are given opportunities to prove themselves, although lacking formal educational requirements. The enrolment of part‐time students is increasing dramatically. Community colleges function in and out of warehouses, store fronts, playgrounds, old military, bases, etc. Community colleges have not provided educational programmes to any great extent via correspondence courses; however, the television medium is gaining in popularity. Community colleges are generally commuter colleges. Most colleges do not have student residences. Community colleges are more flexible and imaginative, less obstructed by, or interested in, traditional ways of doing things. Community colleges are faced with a shortage of funds as they attempt to meet their objectives.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2015

David J. Patterson

This qualitative case study explored the information literacy acquisition of 23 students enrolled in a learning community consisting of an advanced English as a Second…

Abstract

This qualitative case study explored the information literacy acquisition of 23 students enrolled in a learning community consisting of an advanced English as a Second Language (ESL) writing class and a one-unit class introducing students to research at a suburban community college library in California. As there are no other known learning communities that link an ESL course to a library course, this site afforded a unique opportunity to understand the ways in which ESL students learn to conduct library research. Students encountered difficulties finding, evaluating, and using information for their ESL assignments. Strategies that the students, their ESL instructor, and their instructional librarian crafted in response were enabled by the learning community structure. These strategies included integration of the two courses’ curricula, contextualized learning activities, and dialogue. ESL students in this study simultaneously discovered new language forms, new texts, new ideas, and new research practices, in large part because of the relationships that developed over time among the students, instructor, and instructional librarian. Given the increasing number of ESL students in higher education and the growing concern about their academic success, this study attempts to fill a gap in the research literature on ESL students’ information literacy acquisition.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-910-3

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2012

Akemi Yonemura

In Africa, the community college model, catered to nontraditional college aspirants, has been increasingly seen as an important alternative to respond to the growing…

Abstract

In Africa, the community college model, catered to nontraditional college aspirants, has been increasingly seen as an important alternative to respond to the growing demand for postsecondary education. By highlighting the case of Ethiopia, this chapter explores the implications of the community college model through the examination of the system, teacher training, and perspectives of students and employers. Some education and training can be more efficiently delivered at the community college level by means of focused and high-quality teaching, rather than through a long duration of bachelor's program.

Details

Community Colleges Worldwide: Investigating the Global Phenomenon
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-230-1

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Christine Johnson McPhail

At the beginning of each academic term, thousands of students respond to community colleges' open-door invitation with the expectation of fulfilling their dreams of a…

Abstract

At the beginning of each academic term, thousands of students respond to community colleges' open-door invitation with the expectation of fulfilling their dreams of a higher education. When students walk through those doors, they are routinely asked to take basic skills tests in math, reading, and writing (Bailey, Jeong, & Cho, 2008). These new community college students soon discover that the results of these assessment tests will direct their pathway into college-level courses or developmental or remedial courses. According to Bailey, Jeong, and Cho, about 60 percent of incoming students are referred to at least one developmental course, and many are referred to multiple levels of developmental education before they can be considered ready for college. McCabe (2000) reported that 20 percent of African-American students enrolled in community colleges have seriously deficient skills, that is, they are placed in developmental reading, writing, and math and assigned to a lower level remedial course in at least one area. Only 5 percent of Caucasian students, however, come to community colleges with seriously deficient skills.

Details

Support Systems and Services for Diverse Populations: Considering the Intersection of Race, Gender, and the Needs of Black Female Undergraduates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-943-2

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

W. Reed Scull, Cliff Harbour and Keonghee Tao Han

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to encourage community college leaders to make greater use of the human resources organizational frame in understanding their…

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238

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to encourage community college leaders to make greater use of the human resources organizational frame in understanding their organizations and implementing measures to support its students.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach: Concepts are drawn from key texts examining human resources organizational frame analysis and community college leadership to locate areas of community college policy development and operations that resonate with tenets of this organizational frame.

Findings

Connections between some of the typical operations and policies of community colleges and the analytical tenets and concerns of the human resources frame are explored.

Research limitations/implications

More in-depth literature analysis could well lead to the discussion of additional measures animated by the human resources frame that can be taken to better support students and their learning.

Practical implications

These connections between the human resources frame and community college policy and methods of operation lead to the authors’ recommendation that community college leaders should make particular efforts think and act with the human resources frame in mind. Emerging issues that are consistent with the concerns and tenets of this frame can be highlighted and recognized for further use in leadership and management practice.

Social implications

Community colleges are critical in human capital development for all societal sectors. A human resources perspective puts people and human values at the center of organizational analysis.

Originality/value

We add emphasis to leading recommendations for understanding and practice of community colleges through multiple frames. We suggest that the concerns of the human resource organizational frame can help leaders provide thought and action that has additional relevance and possibility.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2014

J. Luke Wood and John D. Harrison

This paper focuses on the Obama administration’s American Graduation Initiative (AGI) and the associated completion agenda.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focuses on the Obama administration’s American Graduation Initiative (AGI) and the associated completion agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we provide an in-depth overview of the AGI with a focus on: (a) articulating the rationale that prompted the AGI; (b) describing the four primary components of the reform effort; (c) examining the political forces that led to its demise; (d) investigating the derivatives of the AGI in the form of private foundation and state-level efforts to bolster success rates; and (e) illuminating criticisms of the AGI that could have served to complicate the initiative’s success.

Originality/value

In the latter section of the paper, we also offer recommendations for future national and state policy.

Details

The Obama Administration and Educational Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-709-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Kenneth Ray, Sylvia Marion Carley and Derrick Brown

Community college African American male student enrollment and academic success is diminishing. The authors explore the importance and wisdom of mentoring programs for…

Abstract

Community college African American male student enrollment and academic success is diminishing. The authors explore the importance and wisdom of mentoring programs for African American males attending community colleges. The chapter considers issues of student persistence and retention and how they relate to effective community college mentoring programs. Specifically, the authors discuss how community college mentoring programs can counteract inherent obstacles for African American students attending commuter style campuses. A description of how some community colleges successfully engage African American male students in order to achieve Kuh's four attributes of a supportive college environment and to overcome the issues of college departure -- being first-generation college students, lacking academic self-concept, no or minimal institutional engagement with students, and no or minimal student involvement student involvement on campus – is provided. The authors highlight successful community college programs which include the national “Students African American Brotherhood” program, Santa Fe College's “My Brother's Keeper,” the North Carolina Community College System, and Hillsborough Community College's Collegiate 100.

Details

Black American Males in Higher Education: Diminishing Proportions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-899-1

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