Search results

1 – 10 of over 85000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Peng S. Chan and Brad Welebir

The Internet is a powerful and popular medium for information exchange. Because of its 24‐hour accessibility, people who are not able to attend a traditional college or…

Abstract

The Internet is a powerful and popular medium for information exchange. Because of its 24‐hour accessibility, people who are not able to attend a traditional college or university can obtain an education from a distance easier than ever before, and at their own pace. The physical reach of the university has been dramatically expanded, which in turn has led administrators to re‐evaluate their strategies. This study examines the manner in which traditional higher education is being transformed by the Internet and suggests ways for higher educational institutions to take advantage of this powerful medium.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Elena Sibirskaya, Elena Popkova, Lyudmila Oveshnikova and Irina Tarasova

The purpose of this paper is to verify the developed hypothesis on the basis of comparison of remote education and traditional education in terms of its effectiveness at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify the developed hypothesis on the basis of comparison of remote education and traditional education in terms of its effectiveness at the micro-level, as well as to determine the presence, degree and nature of correlation between the share of remote education and level of development of economic systems of separate states (macro-level).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodologies of this paper are based on the system approach and include methods of research investigation such as problem, logical, comparative analysis, synthesis and formalization, as well as a purposely designed author’s method of assessment of the effectiveness of remote education and traditional education. In addition to the specified methods, this methodology also includes the methods of correlation and regression analysis which are used by the authors to determine the presence and degree of correlation between the share of remote education and the state of macro-level economic systems. The authors have analyzed the correlation between the share of remote education in the higher education structure according to the summarized data of the ICEF Monitor and the existing studies and publications on this topic (y) with indicators of macro-level economic systems such as GDP, billions of dollars (x1); GDP per capita (x2); Education Index according to the United Nations Development Program (x3); Knowledge Economy Index according to The World Bank Group (x4); and the index of innovative development of socioeconomic systems according to INSEAD, WIPO and Cornell University (x5). The econometric analysis of the mentioned factors was performed after that.

Findings

The authors have come to conclusion that remote education is indeed much more effective at the micro-level, since it allows the students to receive similar educational services with greater convenience, a wider choice of higher educational institutions and at a lower cost compared to traditional education. At the same time, no negative influence of remote education on the macro-level economic system has been revealed; on the contrary, a positive, albeit slight, influence similar to traditional education has been found. For this reason, promotion of the formation and development of remote education is recommended instead of limitation, since it allows modernizing the educational system for the benefit of both supply and demand.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the development of the concept of socioeconomic development of economic systems through clarification of influence of remote education on it.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2018

Ashley Hass and Mathew Joseph

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ perceptions of online vs traditional (face-to-face) course offerings at the business school of a liberal arts university…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ perceptions of online vs traditional (face-to-face) course offerings at the business school of a liberal arts university in southwest USA. The research compares perceptions of students who have been subjected to online education along with those who have not been exposed to online education and examines likelihood to take online courses.

Design/methodology/approach

Paper and pencil surveys were distributed in different classes in business classes at a university in southwest USA. The target group was undergraduate students.

Findings

The results indicate that overall, students have neutral perceptions about online courses, while favorable perceptions are strongly associated with likelihood to take online courses. Moreover, prior exposure with online courses is not a significant factor in forming favorable perceptions about online courses.

Research limitations/implications

The present research is limited in generalizability and the institution surveyed in the southwest region is new to online courses offering in their curriculum and not all the participants had prior experience with online courses.

Originality/value

Although this paper compares online education with traditional, another option for methods of education include hybrid models incorporating both. A possible third option not discussed through this research is a hybrid or blended learning course, a combination of both online and traditional courses. This opens the options for the student, as hybrid courses can be built with many different options. One includes using technology for “screencasts” or lectures online.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Chunjiao Jiang and Pengcheng Mao

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Si-shu, a traditional form of local, private education grounded in classical instruction, responded to the rapid modernization…

Abstract

Purpose:

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Si-shu, a traditional form of local, private education grounded in classical instruction, responded to the rapid modernization of education during the late Qing dynasty and early Republic of China and to explain why these schools, once extraordinarily adaptable, finally disappeared.

Design/methodology/approach:

The authors have examined both primary and secondary sources, including government reports, education yearbooks, professional annals, public archives, and published research to analyze the social, political and institutional changes that reshaped Si-shu in the context of China's late-19th- and early-20th-century educational modernization.

Findings:

Si-shu went through four stages of institutional change during the last century. First, they faced increased competition from new-style (westernized) schools during the late Qing dynasty. Second, they engaged in a process of intense self-reform, particularly after the Xinhai Revolution of 1911. Third, they were marginalized by the new educational systems of the Republic of China, especially the Renxu School System of 1922 and the Wuchen School System of 1928. Finally, after the foundation of the People's Republic of China in 1949, they were considered remnants of feudal culture and forcibly replaced by modern schools.

Originality/value:

This paper brings hitherto unexplored Chinese sources to an English-speaking audience in an effort to shed new light on the history of traditional Chinese education. The fate of Si-shu was part of the larger modernization of Chinese education – a development that had both advantages and disadvantages.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Aleksei V. Bogoviz, Svetlana Lobova, Julia Ragulina and Alexander Alekseev

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of remote education on the consumer value of university education by the example of modern Russia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of remote education on the consumer value of university education by the example of modern Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors determine the consumer value of university education in modern Russia in the conditions of the availability of predominantly traditional education; determine socio-economic problems that are caused by the low consumer value of university education in modern Russia; determine the potential of remote education in the increase of the consumer value of university education; and develop recommendations for the increase of the consumer value of university education in modern Russia through the development of remote education.

Findings

It is concluded that traditional university education is dominating in Russia. It is standardized and does not allow for the full consideration of individual capabilities and needs of each separate student, which causes the low consumer value of university education. The limitation of traditional and remote education, caused by the fact that educational services in each form are provided by completely different universities, hinders the development of the potential of remote education in stimulating the increase of the consumer value of university education.

Originality/value

In order to solve this problem, it is recommended to unify traditional and remote education within the diversification of the forms of the provision of educational services by modern Russian universities. For that, a conceptual model for increasing the consumer value of university education in modern Russia through the development of remote education is presented. This model focuses on applicant and students with their individual capabilities and needs and universities with their material and technical, intellectual, marketing and other resources. At that, the educational form goes to the background, being not a self-goal but a method of its achievement – the provision of the high consumer value of university education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2016

Shoko Yamada

This chapter highlights the characteristics of Asia through the analysis of policy-related documents by five donor countries, namely Japan, South Korea, China, India and…

Abstract

This chapter highlights the characteristics of Asia through the analysis of policy-related documents by five donor countries, namely Japan, South Korea, China, India and Thailand. It will also examine the roles played by regional bodies such as the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) and ASPBAE (the Asia South Pacific Association for Basic and Adult Education) as the horizontal channels influencing aid policies in respective countries. Together with the analysis of the national and organizational policies, the regional process of building consensus on the post-2015 agenda is examined, with a particular focus on the Asia-Pacific Regional Education Conference (APREC) held in August 2014.

The analysis reveals that the region has two faces: one is imaginary and the other is functional. There is a common trend across Asian donors to refer to their historical ties with regions and countries to which they provide assistance and their traditional notions of education and development. They highlight Asian features in contrast to conventional aid principles and approaches based on the Western value system, either apparently or in a muted manner. In this sense, the imagined community of Asia with common cultural roots is perceived by the policymakers across the board.

At the same time, administratively, the importance of the region as a stage between the national and global levels is recognized increasingly in the multilateral global governance structure. With this broadened participatory structure, as discussed in the chapter ‘Post-EFA Global Discourse: The Process of Shaping the Shared View of the ‘Education Community’’, the expected function of the region to transmit the norms and requests from the global level and to collect and summarize national voices has increased.

Details

Post-Education-Forall and Sustainable Development Paradigm: Structural Changes with Diversifying Actors and Norms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-271-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Joseph A. Rosendale

The purpose of this paper is to examine hiring managers’ perceptions of massive open online courses (MOOCs) as compared to traditional degree-conferred forms of higher…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine hiring managers’ perceptions of massive open online courses (MOOCs) as compared to traditional degree-conferred forms of higher education in relation to hiring and employment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is presented along with a triangulated theoretical framework. Using online survey data, quantitative methods reveal findings related to the main research question: what are hiring managers’ attitudes toward MOOCs as a form of post-secondary education?

Findings

Analysis of the data reveals that hiring managers have a clear preference for traditionally educated job applicants but employer demographics, apart from organizational procedures, do not significantly impact their overall perceptions of MOOCs’ value.

Research limitations/implications

Most of the research is based on anecdotal research. Very little has been written on how to fix this problem.

Practical implications

This paper illustrates implications of MOOCs’ future development and implementation both in higher education and in the labor-force. The main implication is that MOOCs represent neither a panacea to the issues facing higher education and the American labor-force nor an alarming threat to stakeholders appreciative of the status quo.

Originality/value

This paper fills a current research gap as evidenced in the literature; employers’ perceptions of MOOC-educated job applicants when compared to traditionally educated/degree-conferred job applicants. By determining the value of MOOCs as employers pragmatically view them, stakeholder groups can better determine their future positioning of MOOC-related resources in addition to time and money allocated in MOOCs’ direction.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Stephen L Morgan and William R Morgan

This case study of Kano, Nigeria, examines changes over the past four decades in an education and labor market relationship that has evolved since the 10th century. We…

Abstract

This case study of Kano, Nigeria, examines changes over the past four decades in an education and labor market relationship that has evolved since the 10th century. We first offer an analysis of the historical origins of Kano’s current three-layered segmented labor market and its corresponding three distinct, but increasingly overlapping, educational pathways. We then compare the labor market entry pathways reported in 1974 and 1992 by two cohorts of young adult males, the respondents having first been surveyed as 17-year-olds in 1965 and 1979.

Despite higher levels of modern secular education in 1992 for males in all occupational destinations, apprenticeship participation was significantly lower in 1992 only for young men who entered the professional and clerical positions that dominate Kano’s public sector. Islamic training remained universal, and in fact increased significantly in years of participation across all occupational destinations. We next show that the jointly educated young men who were part of the first, more traditional sector of the labor market, were less seriously impacted in their earnings by Nigeria’s turbulent end-of-the-century economy. Finally, we discuss the possible advantages of an apprenticeship system coupled to modern secular education for moderating social inequality and stabilizing economic development in sub-Saharan Africa and other less-developed regions.

Details

Inequality Across Societies: Familes, Schools and Persisting Stratification
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-061-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Cristina Matiuta

This chapter investigates how and to which extent the European Union (EU)-related content is taught in Romania, by analyzing the school curricula and the teaching and…

Abstract

This chapter investigates how and to which extent the European Union (EU)-related content is taught in Romania, by analyzing the school curricula and the teaching and learning methods at undergraduate level (primary and secondary school). It distinguishes between formal and non-formal education on European issues and emphasizes the role of teaching and learning the EU in building European identity and the sense of belonging to the EU. Both textbooks (as traditional learning tools) and various educational activities and learning methods using digital technologies (digital platforms, databases, simulations, games, etc.) are taken into account. The examples of non-formal activities presented in this chapter help to better understand the EU, its regions, its institutions, and their functioning. This chapter suggests the need to focus more the school curricula on skills training, participatory learning, education of values and attitudes, and less on mechanical transmission of information. The examples of good practice presented show the role of the European education, whether classical education or that one based on the use of new communication technologies, in the formation of an European consciousness, in the better understanding of the present by learning the past and in the development of participatory attitudes.

Details

Teaching the EU: Fostering Knowledge and Understanding in the Brexit Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-274-1

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Dulekha Kasturiratne, Jonathan Lean and Andy Phippen

The purpose of this paper is to explore how enterprise education was adapted from a UK higher education institution (HEI) setting into an international context through…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how enterprise education was adapted from a UK higher education institution (HEI) setting into an international context through collaboration with two Sri Lankan universities. It demonstrates the value of enterprise education in different cultures, and presents learning from the challenges faced by both staff and students in moving away from a traditional delivery method.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a case study approach, the paper describes a blended, incremental implementation strategy aimed at developing staff and students’ understanding of enterprise education in a gradual, supportive and culturally‐sensitive manner. Evaluation is conducted through an analysis of formal assessment performance and qualitative module review.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the impact of enterprise education in an international context and a capability amongst most students to engage with it successfully, whilst also highlighting the challenges of delivery in a different culture.

Practical implications

The adaptation of enterprise education to an international setting can be shown to add value in various ways, including the development of soft skills and building confidence in team working and communication. It can also be shown to empower staff in delivering teaching using non‐traditional techniques. However, consideration of context is essential to effective delivery.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution to the fields of transnational education and enterprise education in international contexts. It shows the value of enterprise education in challenging traditional delivery methods and the acceptance of such by both staff and students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 85000