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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Gillian Naylor and Kimberly E. Frank

Extant research suggests that salespeople can significantly impact consumers’ outcome perceptions. Examines the importance of initial contact with salespeople on consumers

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Abstract

Extant research suggests that salespeople can significantly impact consumers’ outcome perceptions. Examines the importance of initial contact with salespeople on consumers’ perceptions of value and the impact of salesperson service failure on perceptions of value among non‐purchasers. An exit survey of shoppers was conducted to realistically study these issues. Results show that outcome perceptions were significantly lower when either there was no contact with salespeople, or the consumer had to initiate the contact. The retailer that had the highest percentage of salesperson initiated contact, earned the highest perception ratings and also had the highest ratio of buyers to browsers. Furthermore, non‐purchasers that experienced service failures (slow service or offended by a salesperson) discounted not just the perception of that retail visit, but also overall value compared to other retailers. These results suggest that retailers must encourage their sales staff to initiate consumer contact.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Christine M. Kowalczyk and Natalie A. Mitchell

This paper aims to investigate how consumers perceive the value of luxury brands and the antecedents to these perceptions, including consumer knowledge, reference group…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how consumers perceive the value of luxury brands and the antecedents to these perceptions, including consumer knowledge, reference group influence and accessibility. Prior studies focused less on the salience of consumer knowledge and sources of luxury information, in addition to their accessibility to luxury. Hence, a more nuanced luxury conceptualization is needed to reflect luxury’s conceptual fluidity, consumers’ different lived experiences, accessibility levels and persistent retail marketing changes.

Design/methodology/approach

In a survey involving 475 US respondents, five hypotheses were tested and analyzed with structural equations modeling, examining the relationships among knowledge and accessibility of luxury brands, as well as reference group influence and its impact on consumer value perceptions of luxury brands and consumer behaviors.

Findings

Significant relationships were found for all five hypotheses and demonstrated that knowledge, reference group influence and accessibility have strong relationships with consumers’ personal value perceptions of luxury brands and behavioral measures, including purchase intentions, willingness to recommend to a friend and willingness to pay a price premium.

Originality/value

This conceptualization recognizes that consumers must have luxury brand awareness prior to reference group influence, developing individual luxury value perceptions and entering the buying process. This research contributes to the literature by highlighting consumers’ views of the luxury category, which induce perceptions and potential outcomes. It also expands the understanding of consumer’s accessibility to luxury products, which impacts purchase intentions. While it was conducted in the USA, it yields broader consumer perspectives.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Syed H. Akhter

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the perception of price‐value tradeoff is related to overall satisfaction, purchase intention, word‐of‐mouth advertising, and…

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6122

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the perception of price‐value tradeoff is related to overall satisfaction, purchase intention, word‐of‐mouth advertising, and actual repurchase behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on subscribers and single ticket buyers of a major symphony orchestra in the Midwest are used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The ANOVA results show significant differences across the three levels of price‐value tradeoff in each of the response variables. Additional analyses of cross‐tabulated data show that some of the bivariate relations conform to, as well as depart from, the rational consumer behavior model.

Research limitations/implications

Although the hypotheses are supported, bivariate relations examined in this study can mask or overstate true relations due to the omitted variables bias. Future research can explore reasons for favorable behaviors of consumers whose perception is that the value they receive is overpriced, and also for unfavorable behaviors of consumers whose perception is that the value they received is under‐priced.

Practical implications

The different niches at the edges provide opportunities for marketers to fine‐tune segmentation and marketing mix strategies. The use of standardized strategies for these niches with different perception and behavior linkages will yield suboptimal results.

Originality/value

While previous research has mostly focused on price‐quality linkages, this study extends the body of research by examining the perception of price‐value tradeoff and its relation to overall satisfaction, purchase intention, word‐of‐mouth advertising, and actual repurchase behavior. This adds to our understanding of post consumption behavior, showing how consumers respond to the perception of price‐value tradeoff.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Timmy H. Tseng, Crystal T. Lee, Hsiao-Ting Huang and Wei Hao Yang

Due to fierce competition in the mobile retailing market, it is desirable to identify the success factors driving consumers to reuse a mobile shopping application. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to fierce competition in the mobile retailing market, it is desirable to identify the success factors driving consumers to reuse a mobile shopping application. This research intends to develop a model for mobile shopping app success by integrating an e-commerce systems success (ESS) model and sales promotion benefits and parasocial interaction literatures.

Design/methodology/approach

302 useable online questionnaires were obtained. The data analysis was conducted using the structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicate the validity of the ESS model in predicting consumers' reuse intention of mobile shopping apps where three quality dimensions of system, information and service facilitate both perceived value and user satisfaction, which in turn generates reuse intention. Furthermore, savings and entertainment denoting the utilitarian and hedonic sales promotion benefits have positive impact on perceived value but have no influence on satisfaction. Parasocial intention between consumers and sellers facilitates both value perception and satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the mobile retailing literature by identifying the success factors driving consumers' continuance intention of mobile shopping apps. Theoretically, it validates and extends the ESS model in mobile shopping app context by identifying savings, entertainment and parasocial interaction as additional success factors. Based on the findings, two approaches are proposed to suggest mobile retailers design a successful mobile shopping app.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Xuewei Yang

This research aims to explore the impact of augmented reality (AR), the digital technology that superimposes virtual elements in a real environment, on consumers in the…

Abstract

This research aims to explore the impact of augmented reality (AR), the digital technology that superimposes virtual elements in a real environment, on consumers in the context of experiential marketing. Specifically, this study proposes a research model based on the stimulus-organism-response model, which considers AR media characteristics as external stimuli, consumersvalue perceptions as the organisms, and purchase intentions as the responses. The research model was tested with 248 consumers using structural equation modelling. The results show that informativeness, ease of use, and telepresence have positive effects on consumers’ utilitarian value perception and that telepresence and interactivity have positive effects on hedonic value perception. Overall, this study contributes to the growing body of knowledge on AR and provides actionable insights for managers implementing digital transformation strategies and AR applications in marketing practices.

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Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Domenico Dentoni, Kim Poldner, Stefano Pascucci and William B. Gartner

The objective of this chapter is to understand innovative processes of resource redeployment taking place during consumption. We label this as consumer entrepreneurship…

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to understand innovative processes of resource redeployment taking place during consumption. We label this as consumer entrepreneurship. We define consumer entrepreneurship as the process of sharing and recombining resources innovatively to seek opportunities for self-creating user value. Through the illustration of heterogeneous forms of consumer peer-to-peer sharing, we argue that consumer entrepreneurship: (1) differs ontologically from a view of entrepreneurship as creation of exchange value; (2) bridges the notion, established in marketing studies, of consumers as value creators with the field of entrepreneurship; (3) develops mostly when the process of sharing is regulated informally, based on trust relationships; and (4) thrives as groups of sharing consumers discover and enact their values through the experimentation of multiple forms of product and service procurement. On the basis of these points, consumer entrepreneurship contributes to provide a novel perspective on hybrid organizations, that is, a view of hybrid organizations as everyday spaces where consumers create heterogeneous forms of (utilitarian, social, or environmental) value that they personally use as opposed to reward exchanges. Relative to the current definition of hybrid organizations (Pache & Santos, 2013) and organizing (Battilana & Lee, 2014), we argue that consumer entrepreneurship helps better explain “why, when, and how” consumers increasingly engage in peer-to-peer sharing organizations – a fledging and still underexplored way of organizing consumption worldwide.

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Hybrid Ventures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-078-5

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Abstract

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Strategic Marketing Management in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-745-8

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Melanie Randle and Nadia Zainuddin

Governments are increasingly marketising human services in developed countries, with the aim of giving individuals more choice and control over the support they receive…

Abstract

Purpose

Governments are increasingly marketising human services in developed countries, with the aim of giving individuals more choice and control over the support they receive. Marketisation effectively transforms “clients” into “consumers” who are exposed to competitive market conditions and the marketing strategies of service organisations. However, the heterogeneity amongst citizens leaves some segments of populations more vulnerable within marketised systems. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the marketisation of human services on the value delivered to consumers of disability services. Given that the nature of disabilities can vary greatly, the study also examines the impact of the degree of disability on value creation and destruction for disability service consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative, individual-depth interviews were conducted with 35 participants: 17 were consumers of disability services (either because they have a disability or care for someone who does) and 18 were disability service providers (for example, managers of disability programmes).

Findings

Factors that influence value creation and destruction include quality and turnover of staff, organisation and communication of service providers, ability to advocate effectively, level of funding and accessibility of services. Heterogeneity amongst consumers is also identified as a key factor affecting the creation and destruction of value.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to apply marketing techniques, such as market segmentation, to identify heterogeneity in relation to value creation and value destruction in the context of human services. It also considers the notion of consumer vulnerability, stemming from disability, as an important lens through which the outcomes of marketised human service systems can be evaluated.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Xiao-Yu Xu, Syed Muhammad Usman Tayyab, Fang-Kai Chang and Kai Zhao

This study elicits the critical attributes, consequences and values associated with the purchasing process in the context of cross-border e-commerce (CBEC). The purpose is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study elicits the critical attributes, consequences and values associated with the purchasing process in the context of cross-border e-commerce (CBEC). The purpose is to provide a better understanding of the fundamental factors that determine consumer values in CBEC.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies the means-end-chain theory and soft-laddering techniques to interview 60 CBEC consumers to construct an implication matrix and a hierarchical value map (HVM) of the consumer purchasing process, consisting of attribute-consequence-value (A-C-V) paths.

Findings

By analyzing the significant linkages, elements, ladders and chains in the HVM, four dominant A-C-V paths were identified: economic-driven, efficiency-driven, progress-driven and quality-driven paths.

Research limitations/implications

This study included only Chinese CBEC buyers. This limitation might affect the generalizability of the conclusions as culture, purchase habits and economic development differ between China and other countries.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide CBEC practitioners an understanding of the consumer purchasing process and how consumer values are associated with platform characteristics. Thus, the results aid practitioners in allocating resources and developing CBEC platforms in an appropriate manner and direction.

Originality/value

This study sheds lights on the emerging phenomenon of CBEC. By applying the means-end-chain approach, the study provides a comprehensive HVM for interpreting the consumer online purchasing process in this novel context. By illustrating the dominant paths, this research provides deeper theoretical insights into the specific focuses of CBEC consumer purchasing.

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