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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Thomas Hoyland, Alexandros Psychogios, Olga Epitropaki, Jonathan Damiani, Sumona Mukhuty and Chris Priestnall

Drawing on the social-cognitive and motivational literature of leadership, the present study examines the influence of young adults' self-perceptions of leadership on…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social-cognitive and motivational literature of leadership, the present study examines the influence of young adults' self-perceptions of leadership on their leadership self-efficacy (LSE) and motivation to lead (MTL) in their future career. The authors further examine gender and socio-economic status (SES) as important moderators of the proposed relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The present investigation consists of a two-study research design, based on data collected from young adult samples across two culturally different countries, namely the UK (N = 267) and Japan (N = 127).

Findings

The study presents evidence of self-perceptions of leadership influencing LSE and MTL. The results further support the mediating role of leader self-efficacy. Regarding the moderating role of gender, results in both samples showed that the effects of leader self-efficacy on MTL were stronger for males. SES was found to moderate the effects of leadership self-perceptions of negative implicit leadership theories (ILTs) on LSE in the UK sample and the effects of leadership self-perceptions of positive ILTs on LSE in the Japanese sample.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap of empirical research focused on early adulthood influences on leadership development. In particular, this study has a three-fold contribution, by, firstly, developing a conceptual model that examines the role of young adults' self-perceptions of leadership on their self-efficacy as leaders and MTL; secondly examining contingencies of the proposed relationships; and thirdly testing the conceptual model in two countries.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1934

34. Ground mustard seed, mustard meal, is the unbolted, ground mustard seed and conforms to the standards for mustard seed.

Abstract

34. Ground mustard seed, mustard meal, is the unbolted, ground mustard seed and conforms to the standards for mustard seed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Karen T. Morris

A television comic announces a satiric Golden Fleece Award for the faux pas of some government official. The San Diego Chicken hams it up in the stands of the baseball…

Abstract

A television comic announces a satiric Golden Fleece Award for the faux pas of some government official. The San Diego Chicken hams it up in the stands of the baseball park. A Swiss mime troupe advertises the services of a communications corporation. All these may be more familiar to young people today than is a circus clown. These and other entertainers are all in the business of laughter and provide commentaries on current society.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1929

3. The Local Authority and every officer of a Local Authority authorised in writing by the Authority shall enforce and execute this Part of these Regulations, and for this…

Abstract

3. The Local Authority and every officer of a Local Authority authorised in writing by the Authority shall enforce and execute this Part of these Regulations, and for this purpose shall make such enquiries and take such other steps as may seem to them or him to be necessary for securing the due observance of this Part of the Regulations in the district of the local authority.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Shahab Shoar, Farnad Nasirzadeh and Hamid Reza Zarandi

The purpose of this paper is to present a fault tree (FT)-based approach for quantitative risk analysis in the construction industry that can take into account both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a fault tree (FT)-based approach for quantitative risk analysis in the construction industry that can take into account both objective and subjective uncertainties.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the identified basic events (BEs) are first categorized based on the availability of historical data into probabilistic and possibilistic. The probabilistic and possibilistic events are represented by probability distributions and fuzzy numbers, respectively. Hybrid uncertainty analysis is then performed through a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and fuzzy set theory. The probability of occurrence of the top event is finally calculated using the proposed FT-based hybrid uncertainty analysis method.

Findings

The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated by implementing in a real steel structure project. A quantitative risk assessment is performed for weld cracks, taking into account of both types of uncertainties. An importance analysis is finally performed to evaluate the contribution of each BE to the probability of occurrence of weld cracks and adopt appropriate response strategies.

Research limitations/implications

In this research, the impact of objective (aleatory) dependence between the occurrences of different BEs and subjective (epistemic) dependence between estimates of the epistemically uncertain probabilities of some BEs are not considered. Moreover, there exist limitations to the application of fuzzy set rules, which were used for aggregating experts’ opinions and ranking purposes of the BEs in the FT model. These limitations can be investigated through further research.

Originality/value

It is believed that the proposed hybrid uncertainty analysis method presents a robust and powerful tool for quantitative risk analysis, as both types of uncertainties are taken into account appropriately.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1948

MURIEL M. GREEN

IT is curious to note how many more books are written for boys than for girls. Considering the growing number of women writers, it might be expected that girls' books…

Abstract

IT is curious to note how many more books are written for boys than for girls. Considering the growing number of women writers, it might be expected that girls' books would predominate. It may be that women writers are canny enough to write with their eye on the boy reader knowing that while a totally feminine story will not attract boys, girls often read their brothers' books. Most of the children's classics appeal to both sexes—Peter Pan, Pinocchio, A Christmas Carol, Hans Brinker, The Wind in the Willows, and The Bastable Children, for example. Even the classics of adventure such as Treasure Island, and Robinson Crusoe, have their female devotees and therefore stand a greater chance of survival than books like Little Women, the Katy series, and Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. With the development of the “family story” popularised by E. Nesbit, there seems to have been a decline in the school story—at least among boys. Either they prefer natural tales of boys and girls together at home, or on holiday, or realistic adventures. A. S. Tring keeps a foot in all three camps, so to speak, with his tale of out‐of‐school activities, adventures and feuds between two day schools. His story entitled The Old Gang (O.U.P., 7/6) is told by the hero himself, in a racy style, and is amusingly illustrated by John Camp. Of the realistic adventure type is The Missing Legatee, by Wilfrid Robertson (O.U.P., 7/6), and it has its setting in the wilds of the Zambesi where the author himself has made expeditions, exploring and big game hunting. It satisfies the boy's demand for plenty of action and at the same time conforms to a good stylistic standard. Another tale of a search undertaken at great risk is David Gammon's Against the Golden Gods (Lutterworth, 5/‐) in which a seventeen year old boy goes out among the head hunters of Papua to rescue his captive father. Fog in the Channel, by Percy Woodcock (Nelson, 7/6) relates stirring adventures by sea, beginning with a collision in the fog when two schoolboys board a mysterious vessel supposed to be on secret service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2020

Miguel Angel Navas, Carlos Sancho and Jose Carpio

The purpose of this paper is to present a new disruptive maintenance model based on new technologies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a new disruptive maintenance model based on new technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is carrying out through the impact of the Industry 4.0, Internet of things, big data, virtual reality and additive manufacturing on maintenance.

Findings

The findings are that new technologies are an evolutionary challenge that is immediately affecting maintenance engineering. It presents a unique opportunity to make a disruptive evolution of maintenance.

Research limitations/implications

The correct development of Maintenance 4.0 relates to the correct implementation of Industry 4.0.

Practical implications

Maintenance 4.0 will greatly improve the main operating indicators: safety, reliability, availability and cost.

Social implications

Maintenance 4.0 will contribute to a circular and sustainable economy.

Originality/value

For the first time, a complete new Maintenance Engineering 4.0 model is proposed. The application of the new technologies appears in each specific maintenance process of the product life cycle.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 37 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1932

The figures contained in these regulations were not intended, either literally or by implication, to be taken as standards for milk. A milk which contains less than 8·5…

Abstract

The figures contained in these regulations were not intended, either literally or by implication, to be taken as standards for milk. A milk which contains less than 8·5 per cent. of solids‐not‐fat is not necessarily adulterated—one that contains 8·5 per cent. or more is not necessarily genuine. All that the regulations do is to move the onus of proof. In the case of the prosecution of a vendor of milk for a sample which contained 8·5 or more of solids‐not‐fat the Local Authority would have to prove that the sample was adulterated, in the case of a prosecution for a sample which contained less than 8·5 per cent. of solids‐not‐fat, the defendant, in order to escape conviction, would have to prove the milk to be genuine. The weight which has been given to this limit of 8·5 per cent. of solids‐not‐fat has varied considerably. There are those who appear to consider that it is almost an absolute minimum, and that any milk which contains less than this amount is almost certainly watered, whilst others attach little importance to this figure. It may be desirable to interpolate at this point the figures which have been obtained recently on the samples taken in the County of Lancaster. Since the beginning of the year 1930, 5,959 samples of milk have been examined, of this number 121, or 2·0 per cent., have contained less than 8·5 per cent. of solids‐not‐fat. By means of some of the methods which are described below each of these deficient samples has been examined for the presence of added water, and it has been found that 102 contained added water, whilst 19 were naturally poor. It follows, then, as far as these samples are concerned, that in the case of herds of cows, only 0·3 per cent. give milk containing less than 8·5 per cent. of solids‐not‐fat. From this it must of necessity follow that the limit of 8·5 is at least a very good sorting test. In fact it is far more likely to fail to detect slightly adulterated milks (containing, say, from 1 to 5 per cent. of added water) than it is to describe milks as adulterated which are in reality genuine but poor. Dr. J. F. Tocher, who holds the position of Public Analyst to many of the Scottish Counties, and who is a very outspoken critic of the methods adopted for the determination of added water, has written on this subject to a considerable extent. The following statement, which was made by him in his 1925 Report, has been brought to my notice § with the suggestion that it should be referred to in this report. Dr. Tocher writes:—“The general conclusion from these results is that it is quite unsound on the part of analysts to express a definite opinion that water has been added to milk, when a sample has been found to be below 8·5 per cent. in solids‐in‐fat.” If such a statement as this merely means that a milk is not necessarily watered if the percentage of solids‐not‐fat is below 8·5 it is, of course, not only correct, but absolutely unassailable; in fact, it is merely putting the limit of the Regulations into other words. To those, however, who are familiar with Dr. Tocher's other writings, it may appear that there is something more than this behind the words used. On many occasions in the past Dr. Tocher has stated categorically that it is not possible to prove by chemical or physical examination that a milk is or is not watered, and that all that an analyst can say is that the milk is below the limit, and leave the interpretation of the fact to others, the final evidence being obtained from those who have handled the milk. Apart from the fact that it is not usual to give undue weight to evidence obtained from a defendant it would be quite impossible to rely entirely on this source, for the reasons given in the following paragraph.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1945

Already there is evidence of activity in library circles that was difficult or impossible during the war. A.S.L.I.B. did continue its conferences and the successful one…

Abstract

Already there is evidence of activity in library circles that was difficult or impossible during the war. A.S.L.I.B. did continue its conferences and the successful one held last month was a useful member of the series. This month the London and Home Counties Branch of the L.A. meets for a week‐end conference at Brighton where some interesting matters are on the programme but, what is more useful, we are able to resume again the pleasure of lounging and discussing together for a more extended time than we have been able to do lately. The South‐Eastern Regional Library System has held its Annual Council Meeting at which some important organization matters were settled and Mr. McColvin continued his missionary work on post‐war possibilities. The School of Librarianship duly began its resumed career on October 3rd. The Library Association Council has held its first officially correct meeting, having been released to do so by the Privy Council. Up and down the country there is evidence that the profession is stretching itself as a preliminary to awaking to activity.

Details

New Library World, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Stephanie Maynard-Patrick and S. Gayle Baugh

The authors introduce a new measure of felt obligation to mentor in order to explore generalized reciprocity in mentoring. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors introduce a new measure of felt obligation to mentor in order to explore generalized reciprocity in mentoring. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether felt obligation to mentor adds prediction to mentor job performance in combination with mentoring functions provided and mentor-assessed benefits and costs of mentoring.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested in a sample of firefighters in the Southwestern USA using moderated regression analysis.

Findings

Protégé reported mentoring functions provided predicted mentor performance, but neither mentoring benefits nor costs predicted mentor performance. Felt obligation to mentor interacted with mentoring functions reported such that mentor performance was highest when both mentoring functions provided and felt obligation to mentor were high.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that the new measure may prove to be of value for exploring generalized reciprocity in mentoring. Further, more research using mentoring benefits and costs is merited. Findings are limited by use of a new measure of felt obligation to mentor as well as the fact that the research was conducted in a setting in which employees were expected to serve as mentors.

Practical implications

Organizations may leverage felt obligation to mentor in order to support effective informal or formal mentoring relationships, whereas focusing on the benefits of mentoring may be a less valuable strategy.

Originality/value

The research offers a new measure to help to understand generalized reciprocity as a motivation to mentor as well as suggesting that more empirical attention should be given to the perceived benefits and costs of mentoring.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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