Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

David Bennett, Paul Forrester and John Hassard

Links the concept of market‐driven business strategies with thedesign of production systems. It draws upon the case of a firm which,during the last decade, changed its…

Abstract

Links the concept of market‐driven business strategies with the design of production systems. It draws upon the case of a firm which, during the last decade, changed its strategy from being “technology led” to “market driven”. The research, based on interdisciplinary fieldwork involving long‐term participant observation, investigated the factors which contribute to the successful design and implementation of flexible production systems in electronics assembly. These investigations were conducted in collaboration with a major computer manufacturer, with other electronics firms being studied for comparison. The research identified a number of strategies and actions seen as crucial to the development of efficient flexible production systems, namely: effective integration of subsystems, development of appropriate controls and performance measures, compatibility between production system design and organization structure, and the development of a climate conducive to organizational change. Overall, the analysis suggests that in the electronics industry there exists an extremely high degree of environmental complexity and turbulence. This serves to shape the strategic, technical and social structures that are developed to match this complexity, examples of which are niche marketing, flexible manufacturing and employee harmonization.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Eric G. Olson

Business leaders can apply key messages as early as today to begin aligning business operations with business strategy to strengthen sustainability. Principles can be

Abstract

Purpose

Business leaders can apply key messages as early as today to begin aligning business operations with business strategy to strengthen sustainability. Principles can be applied at all levels in any organization, from the entire enterprise down to discreet product or service offerings. The article emphasizes that the enablers of profitable operations over long periods of time will be internally integrated and networked across industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Challenges with sustainability in many existing strategies are explained, and case studies that illustrate both success and failure are described to illustrate key principles. Once the viewpoints are developed and supported with specific cases and research findings, actionable recommendations are made in a prescription for change.

Findings

Achieving sustainable profitability and growth is increasingly difficult for many companies because of shorter product lifecycles, eroding intellectual property advantages, and other growing complexities from the broader business environment. When operations are integrated with business strategy, forces align to sustain profitability and the strategy is more difficult to imitate or leap‐frog. Organizational competencies, cross‐industry capabilities and stakeholder integration all play a role in integrated operations.

Originality/value

The importance of integrating operational capabilities with business strategy is explained and the rewards are articulated using real‐world cases, research and industry‐accepted practices. The prescription set forth for change is evident in some of the world's most successful companies that have successfully sustained profitability and growth. Enterprises that integrate their operations with strategy both across functions and throughout entire product lifecycles will increasingly be rewarded by investors, applauded by customers, and envied by competitors.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

G.P. Pisano

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Robert G. Schwartz and Richard D. Teach

Although unproven, many researchers have assumed that firm strategies remain constant over time, but such conclusions have resulted in conflicting generalizations. This…

Abstract

Although unproven, many researchers have assumed that firm strategies remain constant over time, but such conclusions have resulted in conflicting generalizations. This study further extends the use of interpoint distance methodology to compare factor structures of marketing strategies of entrepreneurial technology firms at two points‐in‐time – 1989 and 1998.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Ashok Ranchhod and Cãlin Gurãu

Successful marketing strategies depend very much on an organisation's ability to implement them. As the role of technology grows apace in marketing, it is important to…

Abstract

Successful marketing strategies depend very much on an organisation's ability to implement them. As the role of technology grows apace in marketing, it is important to understand how IT and organizational processes impact on the implementation of marketing strategies. This paper attempts to show how technology is changing the nature of marketing and then shows its interaction with people and processes. It also offers organisations an opportunity to undertake a self‐evaluation exercise to determine how well integrated are their implementation policies. In general, the argument outlined indicates that for successful implementation of strategies an organisation has to integrate people, processes and IT.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Samuel Bodily and Sankaran Venkataraman

Much of strategy has been about defense, building the largest castle with the thickest walls to defend position, and tying down the customer with switching costs…

Abstract

Much of strategy has been about defense, building the largest castle with the thickest walls to defend position, and tying down the customer with switching costs, standards, and transaction costs. The digital age changed that, making ineffective the usual competitive advantages of size and scope, infrastructure, and the former capabilities. The metaphor has moved from walls to windows: for transparency, fresh air, connection, and some protection from the harsher elements. A proactive windows strategy assembles scale and scope collaboratively, creates relationships that make switching unattractive, develops intangible resources all along the value chain, and builds co‐specialized capabilities. Illustrative examples come from three companies that have thrived in the digital age: eBay (a new company and industry), Lending Tree (new in an old industry), and Charles Schwab (old in an old industry).

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Nicholas G. Carr

When a valuable new technology emerges, it provides forward‐looking companies with opportunities for gaining a strong and durable edge over the competition. But as the…

Abstract

When a valuable new technology emerges, it provides forward‐looking companies with opportunities for gaining a strong and durable edge over the competition. But as the technology matures and standardizes, it loses its power to provide competitive advantage. What it doesn’t lose is its power to destroy advantage. The rail system, for example, neutralized many of the traditional locational advantages held by companies situated near ports, mine heads, and population centers. With information technology, this neutralizing effect promises to be particularly strong – and thus poses particularly difficult challenges for business executives. Because IT is so flexible in its application and so deeply entwined with business processes, it can corrode advantages across many aspects of a company’s business. Any traditional advantage in prosecuting a particular activity or process, from setting type to designing components to providing customer service, will tend to dissipate as that activity or process is automated. The fact that competitive advantage has become more difficult to sustain doesn’t make it less important, as some have argued; it makes it more important. As business processes and systems become more homogeneous, only the strategically astute companies will be able to rise above the competitive free‐for‐all. Today’s smart managers will seek to combine sustainable advantages (those built on distinctive and defensible positionings) with leverageable advantages (transitory advantages that provide stepping stones to future advantages). In the information age, competitive advantage needs to be viewed as both an end and a means.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Jesús M. Valdaliso, Edurne Magro, Mikel Navarro, Mari Jose Aranguren and James R. Wilson

– The purpose of this paper is to apply the path dependence theoretical framework to STI policies that support research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the path dependence theoretical framework to STI policies that support research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3).

Design/methodology/approach

Review of the recent literature on the phases, sources of reinforcement and change mechanisms (layering, conversion, recombination, etc.) present in path-dependent processes, as well as the role played by mental frameworks, political agents and power relations; and its illustration and testing over 30 years of STI policy development in the Basque Country.

Findings

How to operationalise the analysis of continuity and change of STI policies supporting RIS3 policies characterised by path dependence processes. Likewise, learnings from the analysis of Basque case regarding the types of challenges that European regions will face as they design their RIS3, according to their degree of maturity in STI policies.

Originality/value

It is the first time that the recently developed tools for analysis of path-dependent processes are applied to the development of STI policies supporting RIS3 policies.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2007

Sami Kajalo, Risto Rajala and Mika Westerlund

Technology‐related issues have an increasing impact on business. The alignment between overall business objectives and technology‐related decisions, such as decisions on…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology‐related issues have an increasing impact on business. The alignment between overall business objectives and technology‐related decisions, such as decisions on application service acquisitions, resurfaces occasionally in the intense academic discussion on information systems (IS). Prior research indicates that the alignment of business and IS decisions remains a major concern for business practitioners. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that drive the consistency in technology‐related decisions and result in diverse modes of business‐IS alignment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates application service acquisitions among the top 200 firms in Finland. In this quantitative empirical study, principal component analysis with varimax rotation method is used to examine the companies' drivers for business‐IS alignment. Moreover, the firms are categorized using the cluster analysis method.

Findings

This study identifies four factors that drive the achievement of business‐IS alignment. These factors are: awareness of the impact and risks of IS decisions, efficacy of IS management, systematic decision making process, and business development orientation of IS management. Moreover, the study identifies four clusters of firms that illustrate diverse modes of business‐IS alignment: ad‐hoc alignment, business‐driven alignment, consensual alignment, and technology‐driven alignment.

Originality/value

The value of the study lies in revealing the key factors influencing the alignment of vital IS investments and the overall business strategy. The study identifies four clearly different approaches to business‐IS alignment. Moreover, the paper suggests that business‐IS alignment stems from several factors, including the collective development of strategies that reflect the combined knowledge of business and IS managers.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000