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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Sue Holttum

The purpose of this paper is to examine two recent papers on Open Dialogue, an approach for people experiencing psychosis that involves people’s social networks from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two recent papers on Open Dialogue, an approach for people experiencing psychosis that involves people’s social networks from the beginning, and aims to empower the service user and their network to develop a shared view of what is happening and what to do.

Design/methodology/approach

A search was carried out for recent papers on Open Dialogue.

Findings

One paper reported on outcomes after an average of 20 years for people treated with Open Dialogue approach compared with usual treatment in Finland. Outcome was statistically significantly better for people who received Open Dialogue. A second paper reported on interviews with 20 people who had received Open Dialogue approach 20 years earlier. Participants told stories of life events and circumstances that caused accumulating stress leading to the mental health crisis. They gradually came through by their own actions and support from others. This may reflect how Open Dialogue emphasises personal agency and social support.

Originality/value

These are the first two papers to report on longer-term follow-up after Open Dialogue treatment. They continue to support the suggestion that Open Dialogue can be more beneficial than usual treatment. By including and working with people’s social networks, Open Dialogue may be particularly efficient at mobilising people’s social resources and empowering their personal agency.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Varun Elembilassery and Shreyashi Chakraborty

The experience of individuals has a huge potential for management education and development. Specific approaches are required to transform experience into learning. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The experience of individuals has a huge potential for management education and development. Specific approaches are required to transform experience into learning. The purpose of this paper is to create a framework of dialogic approach, as a method of experience-based learning, which can be used for transforming the experience into learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses analytical abstraction and conceptual integration to develop the framework of dialogic approach. Evidence from prior research studies is used as the theoretical background to support the framework.

Findings

Dialogue is important for unravelling the experience and creating learning. Dialogic approach as a tool for experience-based learning is developed by combining reflective, appreciative and generative dialogues in a theoretically consistent sequence.

Practical implications

The proposed framework is operationalised as a three-phase process for delivering the dialogic approach and can be used by educators.

Originality/value

The framework of dialogic approach is unique as it combines different types of dialogues. The framework is independent of context and can be applied globally for management education and development, which is a novel contribution.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Neysa L. Figueroa and Seneca Vaught

In attempts to defuse racial tensions on campus, higher education administrators have often commissioned special units and campus-wide initiatives. Historically, these…

Abstract

In attempts to defuse racial tensions on campus, higher education administrators have often commissioned special units and campus-wide initiatives. Historically, these commissions often address racial challenges in higher education that impact both faculty and students. If designed and deployed carefully, these commissions can be very useful mechanisms to address sensitive racial, religious, and linguistic concerns on campus. Despite the prevalence of studies that discuss racial experiences on campus, far less scholarship has focused on the effectiveness of these commissions and the dialogic strategies that faculty of color have employed in their service.

This study draws on three major findings. First, the chapter explores why the presidential commission structure is a powerful mechanism for improving dialogue about racial and ethnic issues on campus. Former commissioners discuss its potential for addressing the complex and interlocking concerns of faculty, staff, and students of color. Second, although the commission’s structure is promising, we present numerous problems that require further attention. We discuss how the emphasis on dialogue and less dedication to targeted actions and policies may actually undermine the goals of commissions like these and further frustrate aggrieved faculty, staff, and students. Third, the chapter highlights successful and unsuccessful strategies for sustaining fruitful dialogue that lead to an increased understanding and acceptance of diverse viewpoints and perspectives. These findings have specific relevance for international faculty and faculty of color interested in ways to be more proactive in shaping existing programs, policies, and approaches to meet the diverse needs of university life.

Details

Diversity and Triumphs of Navigating the Terrain of Academe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-608-3

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Judy Rodgers

The use of dialogues within and across organizations is on the rise. This increase is a tacit acknowledgement of the relational foundations from which new meaning is…

Abstract

The use of dialogues within and across organizations is on the rise. This increase is a tacit acknowledgement of the relational foundations from which new meaning is created and social innovations emerge. However, coming together for a dialogue doesn’t assure constructive conversation or transformative engagement. Dialogue participants, even when they are asked to “suspend assumptions,” are generally still embedded in the mental models and familiar frameworks that distance them from one another and prevent real generativity and novelty.

This paper proposes Appreciative Inquiry as an approach particularly conducive to creating public dialogues that are generative and transformative. It suggests that a community is best served by inquiry into strengths, assets and past successes. It further proposes that this mode of inquiry tends to produce positive emotional states, which expand the resources and pro-social inclinations of those in the dialogue. It offers five conditions that support generative and transformative public dialogue and explains how Appreciative Inquiry creates these conditions.

Details

Constructive Discourse and Human Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-892-7

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2013

Rombout van den Nieuwenhof

Organizing is mainly a conversational process in which people together construct an organizational reality out of a variety of different positions from a more general…

Abstract

Organizing is mainly a conversational process in which people together construct an organizational reality out of a variety of different positions from a more general organizational discourse. Generative dialogue refers to the differences between those positions, to the hidden potential of the in-between, and to the effort of handling these differences meaningfully and productively. At split second bifurcation points in a dialogue, fear and expanding learning opportunities are in mutual competition. In this chapter, we propose seven levels of dialoguing, with increasing generative potential and increasing difficulty. We propose “The Language of Change” (a framework) as a sensitizing device to co-construct richer, more applicable, and more valuable approaches to complex, dynamic, and unique change processes. I will conclude with some key principles to increase the level of generative dialoguing and some examples from my own practice.

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Organizational Generativity: The Appreciative Inquiry Summit and a Scholarship of Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-330-8

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Aurélien Ragaigne

This study aims to investigate the empowering and constraining effects of performance measurement. The levers of control perspective emphasises the fact that interactive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the empowering and constraining effects of performance measurement. The levers of control perspective emphasises the fact that interactive processes play an important role in balancing these effects. This paper proposes to extend the analysis of effects in this literature, by looking at them in conjunction with the role of dialogue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses a longitudinal case study of the use of user satisfaction indicators in the reception of a French local authority. The data were collected using a three-year longitudinal case study method from semi-directive interviews and participations at meetings.

Findings

The case study shows that performance measurement was introduced to encourage reception employees to make changes to the experience of service users. Employees were involved in the design phase of the survey and in the development of proposals. The dialogue approach represented a way of encouraging employees to agree to accept changes. However, this dialogue offered greater empowerment of employees by the managers.

Research limitations/implications

Further work would be needed to enrich the characteristics of the dialogue and its effects on other performance measurement systems.

Practical implications

The dialogue between employees and managers was designed to be interactive and created a situation with both empowering and constraining effects. The method of organisation, involving regular meetings with formal tasks to be accomplished at each meeting, appears significant for the evolution of the effects.

Originality/value

We extend the levers of control perspective to demonstrate the importance of the dialogue in balancing the effects. The case study makes it easier to understand how the empowering effects are related to the objective of constraint in the dialogue approach, and how these effects evolve.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Mary M Gergen, Kenneth J Gergen and Frank Barrett

In this chapter we are exploring Appreciative Inquiry within organizations through the dialogic process in its relational aspect. The present discussion is composed of…

Abstract

In this chapter we are exploring Appreciative Inquiry within organizations through the dialogic process in its relational aspect. The present discussion is composed of four parts: An exploration of the myriad meanings of dialogue and a description of a useful orienting platform, dialogue as “discursive coordination.” We then turn to the pivotal function of dialogue in the organizing process and the development of a vocabulary of discursive action with practical consequences for effective organizing. We next turn to the problematic potentials of dialogue. A contrast between generative and degenerative dialogue enables us to explore how certain forms of coordination ultimately lead to organizational growth or demise. Among our conclusions we propose that dialogue originates in public, is a form of joint-action, is embodied and contextually embedded, as well as historically and culturally situated. Dialogue may serve both positive and negative ends. Described are four aspects of dialogue – an emphasis on affirmation, productive difference, coherence, and temporal integration. Appreciative inquiry adds an enormously important element to the transformative potentials of dialogue. Other transformative practices and potentials are also described.

Details

Constructive Discourse and Human Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-892-7

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Knowing, Becoming, doing as Teacher Educators: Identity, Intimate Scholarship, Inquiry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-140-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Arie Kizel

This chapter discusses a form of pedagogy of reflection suggested to be defined as the dialogical-reflective professional-development school (DRPDS) – a framework that…

Abstract

This chapter discusses a form of pedagogy of reflection suggested to be defined as the dialogical-reflective professional-development school (DRPDS) – a framework that develops and empowers students by engaging them in a process of continual improvement, responding to diverse situations, providing stimuli for learning, and giving anchors for mediation. The pedagogy of reflection relates to dialogue not only from a theoretical historical context but also by way of example – that is, it offers empowering dialogues within the traditional teacher-training framework. This chapter outlines the importance of the pedagogy of reflection in the multicultural educational space of the preservice education field in Israel, analyzing the first university PDS model. The pedagogy of reflection in the context of the educational dialogue of educators is outlined as a tool for student empowerment, achieved through a community of learners who dedicate space to the development of their whole personality within the profession, taking a moral stance toward the educational discourse, minimizing judgmentalism and prejudice, creating national/gender equality with the goal of examining the fundamental question of educational performance, and reinforcing their sense of organizational belonging within the system. In these contexts, the chapter is based on the elements of dialogical philosophy exemplified in the thought of Burbules, Nelson, Isaacs, Bohm, and Heckmann and the reflective basis of educational and organizational performance exemplified in the writings of van Manen. The chapter also presents two examples from a project in which teaching units based on dialogue and reflection were developed within a dialogic community that represents in its very being collective empowerment, the possibility of coping with problems that are too large for an individual to solve on his/her own, and an alternative to sealed and alienated organizations.

Details

International Teacher Education: Promising Pedagogies (Part A)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-136-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2008

Heather Pincock

This chapter examines the goals and outcomes of intergroup dialogue through the evaluation of a dialogue program between city and suburban high school students located in…

Abstract

This chapter examines the goals and outcomes of intergroup dialogue through the evaluation of a dialogue program between city and suburban high school students located in Syracuse, NY. The Community Wide Dialogue to End Racism, Improve Race Relations and Begin Racial Healing (CWD) organizers share with a wide range of conflict theorists and practitioners the impulse to bring citizens together to talk about complex social conflicts. Two of the main goals of this program, to build participants’ understandings of institutional racism and white privilege, are examined here. Drawing on in-depth interviews with a small sample of dialogue participants, a framework is developed for categorizing participant awareness and understanding of institutional racism and white privilege. The analysis suggests that relatively modest levels of understanding of both concepts should be anticipated from participants both before and after completion of a dialogue of this type. While dramatic changes resulting from the dialogue are not found, the data indicate that the dialogue does have demonstrable impacts on the ways participants think and talk about institutional racism and white privilege. The central challenges faced by participants in understanding the concepts, specifically ability to personalize white privilege and capacity to adopt structural ways of thinking about institutional racism, are identified and described. This research helps to clarify the range of outcomes we can feasibly expect when bringing citizens together to talk about social conflicts by providing a qualitative framework for measuring awareness and understanding of white privilege and institutional racism.

Details

Pushing the Boundaries: New Frontiersin Conflict Resolution and Collaboration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-290-6

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