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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Tri Yumarni and Dilanthi Amaratunga

The purpose of this paper is to discuss policy-relevant findings regarding strategies for mainstreaming gender in achieving sustainable post-disaster reconstruction (PDR).

1878

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss policy-relevant findings regarding strategies for mainstreaming gender in achieving sustainable post-disaster reconstruction (PDR).

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was used to explore the implementation of gender mainstreaming strategies and the link to sustainable PDR. The Bantul and Sleman regencies of Yogyakarta province provide a unique site for researching PDR as they are located in a region that is more strongly affected by earthquakes than nearly any other in Indonesia. Data were collected through interviews with 17 key stakeholders and 26 beneficiaries who were involved during and after the earthquake. To support the interview findings, surveys involving 50 policy makers and 150 beneficiaries were conducted. Content analysis and t-statistics were used in analyzing the data.

Findings

Gender mainstreaming strategies within sustainable reconstruction should incorporate strategies for protecting against gender vulnerabilities and for promoting gender capacities. Both are fundamental to the achievement of sustainable PDR.

Originality/value

The paper establishes comprehensive strategies for mainstreaming gender under three pillars (i.e. economic, social and environmental) of sustainable development. The findings benefit relevant policy makers by improving the policy performance of gender mainstreaming in the affected communities in enhancing sustainable PDR.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Sari Jusi

The purpose of this paper is to analyse social and environmental sustainability considerations developed in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) and to identify…

1806

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse social and environmental sustainability considerations developed in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) and to identify problems and challenges related to sustainable hydropower planning and development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is leaning on empirical analysis based on analysing primary and secondary data and information; official government documents and relevant literature, a series of workshops of the Future Resource and Economy Policies in Laos till 2020 Project (FREPLA2020), and interviews with government officials and experts.

Findings

To achieve its socio‐economic objectives, Lao PDR needs to manage its hydropower development to ensure environmental and social sustainability through developing of the legal, institutional and regulatory environment and strengthening of the institutional capacity of the sector, improving knowledge and data management, and developing institutional coordination across the government agencies.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the Lao government assesses strategically the hydropower development options, prepares capacity building plans, develops risk assessment and management, and learns from past hydropower developments.

Social implications

The paper recommends using hydropower development generated revenues to poverty reduction activities and to strengthen participatory approaches.

Originality/value

The paper can act as a discussion awakener, to help and give some guidance to decision makers and actors in the hydropower sector to integrate sustainable development considerations into hydropower development and planning.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Rizwan Akbar Ali, Sandeeka Mannakkara and Suzanne Wilkinson

This paper aims to describe an in-depth study conducted on transition of recovery into subsequent recovery phases after the 2010 super floods in the Sindh province of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe an in-depth study conducted on transition of recovery into subsequent recovery phases after the 2010 super floods in the Sindh province of Pakistan. The objectives of this research were to examine the post-disaster activities after the floods and highlight the critical areas hindering the transition into an effective recovery phase.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach based on literature reviews with semi-structured interviews with disaster management stakeholders were applied as the primary source of data.

Findings

The study found that long-term recovery was the most neglected phase of post-disaster recovery (PDR). The factors hindering successful transition following short-term recovery activities are lack of following: community-level involvement, local administration and community capacity, disaster governance, different stakeholders and coordination, information and knowledge management.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines the long-term disaster recovery after the 2010 super floods in three districts of Sindh. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to investigate the factors in other areas for different types of disasters.

Practical implications

These findings are critical to planning future post-disaster recoveries in the region. It also provides a basis to investigate other types of disasters.

Originality/value

The transition of recovery into long-term phase has never been investigated before. The recovery phase is an opportune time to incorporate strategies for building back better, resilience, mitigation and preparedness. A PDR that does not incorporate these strategies in the long-term leaves affected communities in more vulnerable conditions for future disasters.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Claire Baldwin, Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes, Vikas Kumar and Luis Rocha-Lona

The academic literature and motivational theory recognise the positive role of motivation on organisational performance and considers personal development as a key…

2267

Abstract

Purpose

The academic literature and motivational theory recognise the positive role of motivation on organisational performance and considers personal development as a key motivational factor. In practice, most organisations employ a personal development review (PDR) process to drive and plan the development of their staff. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelation and impact of the PDR process, and its elements, on staff motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a case study research approach carried out in two large manufacturing-engineering departments of a world-class manufacturing organisation. A survey questionnaire was designed, validated and distributed to the engineering staff and its results were analysed using descriptive statistics.

Findings

The study's results indicate that in most of the cases, a PDR process does not by itself motivate staff. But it argues that a poorly designed and conducted PDR process may make motivation, through personal development, difficult to achieve.

Practical implications

This paper provides manufacturing managers with an opportunity to understand whether a common business process (i.e. PDR), and the elements that comprise it, can be employed as a method to aid in the motivation of their staff.

Originality/value

This research expands the current knowledge on motivational and manufacturing management theory by performing an initial and exploratory study that establishes the impact of the PDR process on staff motivation. It is among the very first investigations that correlate the PDR process and motivation, especially in the manufacturing industry.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Ahmad Firdaus Ahmad Shabudin, Sharifah Nurlaili Farhana Syed Azhar and Theam Foo Ng

A series of “learning lab” projects on disaster risk management for sustainable development (DRM-SD) have been accomplished from 2014 to 2016 in Malaysia, Vietnam, Lao PDR

3721

Abstract

Purpose

A series of “learning lab” projects on disaster risk management for sustainable development (DRM-SD) have been accomplished from 2014 to 2016 in Malaysia, Vietnam, Lao PDR and Cambodia by the Centre for Global Sustainability Studies. The project is designed for professionals from the disaster risk management field to encourage integration of sustainable development (SD) concerns into the larger planning framework for DRM. As a case study for capacity building (CB) evaluation, the central purpose of this study is to explore the approaches, feedbacks and implications of the DRM-SD CB project that have been developed and carried out.

Design/methodology/approach

Three methods have been used which are participation observations, surveys and document analysis. The results show that the project had successfully applied seven different tools to enhance analytical skills and professional knowledge of development practitioners in specific areas of DRM-SD.

Findings

Based on the survey, the project received positive response and valuable information from participants for future project development. Regarding the perspective of outcomes, the result indicates that south–south, ASEAN regional and triangular cooperation and role of higher education in DRM-SD are significant impacts from this project which can bring several benefits and should be promoted as an approach for the DRM-CB project as a whole.

Originality/value

It is hoped that this study will serve as a transfer learning initiative to provide approach guidelines and innovative mechanisms for DRM practitioners who will have the know-how and potential for leadership in DRM-SD.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Lei Huang, Yandong Zhao, Guangxi He, Yangxu Lu, Juanjuan Zhang and Peiyi Wu

The online platform is one of the essential components of the platform economy that is constructed by a large scale of the personal data resource. However, accurate…

Abstract

Purpose

The online platform is one of the essential components of the platform economy that is constructed by a large scale of the personal data resource. However, accurate empirical test of the competition structure of the data-driven online platform is still less. This research is trying to reveal market allocation structure of the personal data resource of China's car-hailing platforms competition by the empirical data analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is applying the social network analysis by R packages, which include k-core decomposition and multilevel community detection from the data connectedness via the decompilation and the examination of the application programming interface of terminal applications.

Findings

This research has found that the car-hailing platforms, which establish more constant personal data connectedness and connectivity with social media platforms, are taking the competitive market advantage within the sample network. Data access discrimination is a complementary method of market power in China's car-hailing industry.

Research limitations/implications

This research offers a new perspective on the analysis of the multi-sided market from the personal data resource allocation mechanism of the car-hailing platform. However, the measurement of the data connectedness requires more empirical industry data.

Practical implications

This research reveals the competition structure that relies on personal data resource allocation mechanism. It offers empirical evidence for governance, which is considered as the critical issue of big data research, by reviewing the nature of the data network.

Social implications

It also reveals the data convergence process of the social system and the technological system.

Originality/value

This research offers a new research method for the real-time regulation of the car-hailing platform.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Sung Lun Tsai, Chiho Ochiai, Min Hui Tseng and Chuan Zhong Deng

The participatory method, a major factor for a successful post-disaster reconstruction (PDR) project, is applied in various stages of the PDR. However, the application of…

Abstract

Purpose

The participatory method, a major factor for a successful post-disaster reconstruction (PDR) project, is applied in various stages of the PDR. However, the application of this method for PDR involving indigenous populations is underexplored. Therefore, this paper aims to analyze the critical factors that can influence the participatory PDR in the indigenous context.

Design/methodology/approach

Two large-scale, indigenous, post-disaster relocation projects after the 2009 Typhoon Morakot were selected as case studies. The qualitative and quantitative methodology (semi-structured interview and questionnaire) were applied in the research.

Findings

A participation-friendly policy, community organization, the extent of damage, flexibility of nongovernmental organizations, understanding of the participatory concept and mutual trust were found to be essential factors that profoundly influence participation in PDR projects.

Originality/value

This study contributes by providing guidelines for future participatory PDR projects, especially in the indigenous context.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Jason von Meding, Lukumon Oyedele and John Bruen

This paper sets out in the context of three strands of knowledge; disaster management, strategic management and project management and builds upon the authors’ (2009…

Abstract

This paper sets out in the context of three strands of knowledge; disaster management, strategic management and project management and builds upon the authors’ (2009) theory for the delivery of post-disaster reconstruction (PDR) projects. With the expected increase in the magnitude and frequency of natural disasters in coming years, more people than ever will be faced with PDR scenarios. In many cases, non-government organisations (NGOs) are in a position to make interventions to improve conditions for people facing the impacts of disasters and it is essential that responding agencies deploy appropriate configurations of competencies to mitigate project barriers. Using a mixed-methods approach, a study incorporated four case studies in post-tsunami Sri Lanka and four case studies in post-cyclone Sidr Bangladesh. Exploratory interviews with expert NGO participants were combined with direct observations and the collection of quantitative survey data. The mechanisms and phenomena observed within the case studies contributed to the development of a conceptual theoretical framework. The study reveals that NGOs face barriers in seven key areas and that they must deploy certain configurations of organisational and operational competencies in order to effectively develop and implement strategies to address these barriers. The theoretical framework demonstrates how the utilisation of these competencies, deployed in targeted clusters, has the potential to create positive outcomes for beneficiaries as measured by PDR Project Success Indicators (PDRPSIs). If dynamic tools can be developed that effectively model competency and predict success, all organisations involved in disaster response and recovery could benefit. In addition, the knowledge is highly transferable to other sectors and environments.

Details

Open House International, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Sung Lun Tsai, Chiho Ochiai, Chuan Zhong Deng and Min Hui Tseng

Several post-disaster housing extension and modification studies have indicated that owner-driven modification behavior relates to socio-economic and livelihood factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Several post-disaster housing extension and modification studies have indicated that owner-driven modification behavior relates to socio-economic and livelihood factors. This study aims to clarify housing extension patterns and examine the relationships among spatial characteristics, sociocultural factors, livelihood factors and housing extensions. This research also highlights the implications of post-disaster housing design for indigenous communities.

Design/methodology/approach

An indigenous community case study was conducted using a literature review. Moreover, interview surveys and housing measurements were implemented based on purposive sampling to diversify interviewees’ backgrounds and the extent of housing extensions.

Findings

This study confirms that housing extensions are closely related to the number of household members and their associated functions and cultural and livelihood factors that were ignored during the design stage. Furthermore, the housing extension process was confirmed to match households’ economic recovery. A post-disaster housing implementation framework for the indigenous population is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

This research only targeted one indigenous community with a limited number of interviewees and samples because of the connection with households.

Practical implications

The study’s proposed resilience post-disaster housing framework can be used to develop post-disaster housing design guidelines, which can benefit policymaking. The proposed participatory concept can be further adopted in future disaster risk-reduction programs.

Originality/value

This study uniquely focuses on the pre- and post-disaster housing layout and the livelihood of an indigenous community. It offers valuable insights for post-disaster reconstruction planners and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Realm Köhler, Sudathip Sae-tan, Christine Lambert and Hans Konrad Biesalski

Food taboos during pregnancy and the postpartum period have been linked to increased risk of maternal and neonatal death. This paper aims to present plant-based food…

Abstract

Purpose

Food taboos during pregnancy and the postpartum period have been linked to increased risk of maternal and neonatal death. This paper aims to present plant-based food restrictions on Southeast Asian women during pregnancy and after giving birth and the rationale behind such cultural practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Google® Scholar, PubMed and Scopus search using the term food taboo, its synonyms and truncations, in combination with the terms pregnancy, postpartum and breastfeeding, and with the name of the Southeast Asian countries, was conducted from January to February 2017. Articles were included in the review if their full texts were accessible online, in English, published from 2005 to 2016 and if they contained primary data from either quantitative or qualitative method.

Findings

A total of 281 articles were downloaded, and 28 were included in this review. The food taboos and the reasons for avoidance were collated and grouped per their occurrence and according to the country or countries where they are practiced. In total, 14 papers generated data on food taboos during pregnancy, 16 papers on postpartum food taboos and/or 6 on breastfeeding.

Research limitations/implications

This review pools together relevant information about plant-based food taboos Southeast Asian women adhere to during pregnancy and after giving birth. However, data are absent for some of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries, and there is a need for more research to get up-to-date information on the local women’s adherence to these cultural practices.

Practical implication

The knowledge of these practices can support stakeholders who are contributing to the reduction of maternal and under-five mortality ratios in Southeast Asia.

Originality/value

This is the first review paper on food taboos covering all ASEAN members and highlighting the need for cultural sensitivity to properly address maternal and child health problems in the region.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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