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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2022

Ikenna Elias Asogwa, Maria Estela Varua, Rina Datt and Peter Humphreys

The COVID-19 pandemic has made humanity contend with the negative footprint of its activities in which social justice, ecological integrity and economic stability are…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has made humanity contend with the negative footprint of its activities in which social justice, ecological integrity and economic stability are compromised. This study aims to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the operation and management of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case study research design was used in the study with interviews from 25 senior-level management staff of NGOs.

Findings

The analysis revealed that COVID-19 impacts NGOs both negatively and positively. Dominant among the negative impacts are a decline in health-seeking behaviours, low programme implementation, increased cost and wastages resulting from PPE, transition to virtual meetings, a decline in capacity building and staff burnout/pressure. However, some positive impacts include increased efficiency through the use of virtual innovations, peer-to-peer intervention through the establishment of networks, flexibility and prompt adaptation to the crisis, prudent management of available resources, etc. This research contributes to theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

Conducting this research and recruiting participants at the height of COVID-19 in Nigeria, in adherence to the prevention guidelines, constituted a considerable limitation to the study.

Practical implications

Although the identified impact could be useful in framing operational policies and guidelines, the study highlights a salient future outlook with policy implications for both the governance of NGOs and the facilitation of sustainable development goals by the government.

Originality/value

Although researchers continue to explore the impact of COVID-19, none has considered the NGO sector, especially in developing countries, and with a focus on providing evidence-backed resilience practices for the future.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 March 2022

Sumiyana, Wivaqussaniyyah, Muhadjir Darwin and Agus Heruanto Hadna

This study investigates partnership building between non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the regencies of Gunung Kidul, Bantul, Sleman, Yogyakarta Province and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates partnership building between non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the regencies of Gunung Kidul, Bantul, Sleman, Yogyakarta Province and Indonesia's central government. This study focuses on the perspective of the collaboration theory to reflect the usefulness of different leadership types. Furthermore, this study identifies the impact of partnership building on program effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an instance case study with thirteen informants who are NGO activists or members of the village, district and provincial governments. This study concludes that NGOs and local government partnerships have reached a collaborative level, characterised by their stakeholders' unity, regular communication, mutual trust and consensus in decision-making.

Findings

This collaborative relationship also shows the integrative leadership style, characterised by openness and active networks with all external parties. Furthermore, this study identifies that partnership building positively impacts and increases the outcomes, especially in capacity building and commitment. Finally, this research proposes a series of innovative policies through stakeholder mapping, forming joint forums, sharing responsibilities and accentuating intimate partnerships.

Originality/value

This research is unique in the following ways: First, this study argues that partnership building occurs due to a specific social contract between a local government and an NGO. The authors show that this contract occurs when a local government possesses innovativeness. Local governments know which programs are not financed from the central budget. They accent their innovativeness for increasing society's welfare by collaborating with an NGO. Second, local governments realise that building partnerships with NGOs is no longer an option but an obligation. This study considers the similarity objectives of providing the best services they can to the community, with the differentiation of the capacities and resources owned by both. Third, this study demonstrates that partnerships between NGOs and governments positively impact communities' development in emerging economies with all the obstacles that exist.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

A. A. Adeyemi, O. T. Bakare, A. J. Akindele and O. Soyode

Public concern for the natural environment has been one of the vital issues of discussion in recent decades across the globe. Individuals are now stressing the importance…

Abstract

Public concern for the natural environment has been one of the vital issues of discussion in recent decades across the globe. Individuals are now stressing the importance of the natural environment. In the context of developing countries, nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) are well positioned to have powerful impact on the discharge of corporate social responsibility through the usual pressures and lobbies exerted by the NGOs and their various networks than any other stakeholder. This study examines the impact of NGOs on environmental reporting of quoted manufacturing companies listed on Nigerian Stock Exchange. Using simple random sampling technique, secondary data were collected from annual reports and accounts of 10 selected manufacturing companies spanning 2010–2019. Multiple regression technique was used to analyse data collected. The findings reveal that environmental reporting and corporate social responsibility costs do not have significant impact on ROA and NPM with p-value of 0.713 and 0.612 at 5% level of significance, respectively, but both variables have positive significant effect on ROA. This means that the fund committed to environmental cost by these selected firms does not reflect on their profitability for the period reviewed. Based on this, it was recommended that as a matter of urgency for international Environmental NGOs should collaborate with local ones in achieving environmental friendly society. Similarly, United Nations should channel more funding on environment-focused NGOs because environmental issue is one of the cardinal points to be achieved by Sustainable Development Goals.

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Liafisu Sina Yekini and Kemi C. Yekini

This chapter, which is in themes, starts with a survey of the rise of environmentalism for the purpose of sustainability. It then evaluates the roles of nongovernmental…

Abstract

This chapter, which is in themes, starts with a survey of the rise of environmentalism for the purpose of sustainability. It then evaluates the roles of nongovernmental organisations' (NGOs') self-regulation and government regulation on the need for accountability that ensures sustainability. NGOs' accountability is a way of making sure that stakeholders' social, environmental and economic sustainability are protected and rigorously evaluated. This chapter further examines what the enduring mechanisms should be if true accountability, which leads to sustainability, will be achieved to suggest a holistic accountability that involves downward and upward accountability. In doing so, this chapter utilised the identified five mechanisms that ensure the continuity of world sustainability, which is prima-facie, the objective of funders/donors, beneficiaries/stakeholders and the NGO's loop.

Details

Environmentalism and NGO Accountability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-002-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Noor Muafiza Masdar and Rohaida Basiruddin

Corporate social responsibilities (CSRs) with social, economic, and environmental elements become of high demand in the private, public, as well as third-world sectors or…

Abstract

Corporate social responsibilities (CSRs) with social, economic, and environmental elements become of high demand in the private, public, as well as third-world sectors or so-called non-governmental organizations (NGOs). These sectors have their own identity in carrying out the CSR projects. However, the CSR initiatives to be implemented by the NGOs promised challenges due to the NGOs' identity in justifying human rights that remains dissimilar with corporation or fund provider's identity to maximize the profit with less concern on the humanitarian issues leading to tension for both parties to have CSR project alliances. NGOs face extreme difficulty to raise funds from the private sector due to their ideology in influencing the social movements that might harm society. Also, the fund raised by the NGOs for CSR projects are somehow misused by this party for its own self-interests and leads to an accountability issue. An NGO is seen as a key player in CSR projects but still there is an issue of legitimacy and mistrust amongst stakeholder groups. Underlying to these issues, this study aims to explore the challenges faced by NGOs in regards to the CSR initiatives that have been announced by the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) to be used widely and harmoniously by all sectors of the world and its future directions to successfully implement CSR in its own style of leadership. Therefore, the involvement of NGOs in CSR initiatives can be effectively employed with government intervention on economics development programmes in alleviating poverty which becomes a central issue highlighted in many countries nowadays. Extensive rules and regulations from the government towards NGOs are embedded within the CSR project developments of NGOs and are necessary in reducing the discrepancies in the roles that NGOs play.

Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2014

Sarah Inauen and Dennis Schoeneborn

The era of globalization has increased the challenges for multinational corporations (MNCs) to retain legitimacy. In striving for legitimacy, MNCs increasingly engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

The era of globalization has increased the challenges for multinational corporations (MNCs) to retain legitimacy. In striving for legitimacy, MNCs increasingly engage in dialogue processes with their stakeholders. However, the era of globalization and the parallel rise of the Internet and the new “Web 2.0” have dramatically widened the range of options for such dialogue processes. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in particular make use of “social media” (e.g., Facebook, Weblogs, Twitter) which enable them to quickly generate attention regarding socially and environmentally harmful business practices by MNCs. In response, MNCs have started applying social media technologies for corporate communication purposes. However, given the novelty of these activities, we lack knowledge on how these organizations make use of social media. Therefore, in this chapter, we examine how MNCs and NGOs utilize one particular social media application, that is, Twitter, for dialogic stakeholder communication.

Design/methodology/approach

In our empirical study, we examine current practices of Twitter usage by MNCs and NGOs. We investigate a dataset of more than 3,000 Twitter articles from 30 MNCs and 30 NGOs in the German-speaking world. Our analysis is based on the “conceptual orality or literality” scale by Koch and Oesterreicher (1994).

Findings

The comparative analysis shows that on average MNCs and NGOs exhibit a surprisingly similar profile on Twitter. Both tend toward conceptual literality. However, the analysis of Tweets per organization reveals a much larger variance. At the extreme poles, while some NGOs (like Greenpeace Youth) make extensive use of the medium’s potential for conceptual orality, some MNCs (like Deutsche Börse) almost entirely adhere to conceptual literality. In other words, these MNCs promote a classical one-way model of communication and fail to make use of the dialogue-like qualities of the medium.

Research limitations

We analyzed a small number of organizations and we restricted our study to MNCs and NGOs in the German-speaking world. Furthermore, Twitter only allows for short messages with a maximum of 140 letters or signs. This, in turn, renders questionable whether the medium is suited to establish deliberative dialogues between MNCs and NGOs that are based on more elaborate arguments which can be expressed in the short format.

Originality/value

Our study addresses the lack of research regarding new possibilities for stakeholder communication in the age of social media. Moreover, the study methodologically contributes to the study of social media in the context of corporate communication by applying the scale of “conceptual orality or literality” to MNCs’ and NGOsTwitter usage.

Details

Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility: Perspectives and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-796-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2012

Takako Izumi and Rajib Shaw

The community-based disaster risk reduction (CBDRR) approach has been taken by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) as a common approach to build resilient communities in…

Abstract

The community-based disaster risk reduction (CBDRR) approach has been taken by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) as a common approach to build resilient communities in their disaster risk reduction (DRR) efforts. The approach has been initially implemented in the developing world by NGOs, followed by international organizations like the International Federations of Red Cross and Red Crescent (Benson, Twigg, & Myers, 2001; Maceda, Gaillard, Stasiak, Le Masson, & Le Berre, 2009). The approach is now increasingly promoted among local governments in order to strengthen the links between the official disaster management system and community-based organizations (Kafle & Murshed, 2006). There are many case studies of DRR projects with community-based approaches by NGOs and local governments, and there are many variations as well (Heijmans, 2009).

Details

Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-868-8

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Jonathan P Doh and Barbara Kotschwar

Civil society, as represented by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), is exerting increasing pressure on national governments, multinational corporations, and…

Abstract

Civil society, as represented by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), is exerting increasing pressure on national governments, multinational corporations, and international institutions. In this chapter we document the evolution of participation by civil society and NGOs in Western Hemisphere economic integration, focusing particularly on the NGO role in three important trade and investment agreements: the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and the Free Trade Area of the Americas process. We find that NGOs are having increasing influence on the trade and investment agreements in the Hemisphere, and are poised to take on a major role in multilateral negotiations and agreements.

Details

North American Economic and Financial Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-094-4

Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2008

Bruce Hemmer

Democratization has become the prescription for peace in conflictual societies, but often stagnates in a political standoff or devolves back to war. Sustainable and…

Abstract

Democratization has become the prescription for peace in conflictual societies, but often stagnates in a political standoff or devolves back to war. Sustainable and effective democracy in these societies requires a citizenry which actively guides and pressures political leaders toward effective policy making for peace. But in societies with little or no democratic tradition, it takes time to develop the attitudes and organizations required. This study examines the relationship of democratic exposure to the development of the ideology of external political participation among peacebuilding NGOs. Using original field interview data, it compares the ideology of 28 peacebuilding NGOs in Northern Ireland to 37 in the less democratic context of Bosnia. The study examines the effects of exposure to democracy on “externally democratic ideology,” defined as an ideology of participation in the political processes of society external to the organization. Three aspects of exposure to democracy are examined: societal democratization, internal democracy in the NGO, and mentorship by outsiders from established democracies. The findings are that internal democracy is associated with externally democratic ideology, but outsider mentorship is not, even when controlling for dominating relationships, and neither is societal democracy, except indirectly via its effect on internal democracy. Implications for theory, policy, and future research are discussed.

Details

Pushing the Boundaries: New Frontiersin Conflict Resolution and Collaboration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-290-6

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Habib Muhammad Shahib, Eko Ganis Sukoharsono, M. Achsin and Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

This chapter develops a new reference for local government accountability in socioenvironmental issues based on the views of leading socioenvironmental nongovernmental…

Abstract

This chapter develops a new reference for local government accountability in socioenvironmental issues based on the views of leading socioenvironmental nongovernmental Organisations (NGOs) in Indonesia. This study introduces an alternative view related to the government accountability model by focussing more on the socioenvironmental issues, which tend to be marginalised due to the dominance of [neo]liberal economic development and New Public Management paradigm in the praxis of government. A Fairclough's critical discourse analysis method has been applied to annual reports from three main socioenvironmental NGOs in Indonesia ranging from 2015 to 2018. This study found that there are three important notes for the local government's regulation, practice and accountability's activities to be in a line with the sustainable paradigm and the views of these NGOs. First and the foremost, the government's policy should give attention to public needs and ecological standards. Secondly, the rights and obligations related to the environmental issues should be transparent and accountable. Lastly, the government should release the accountability reports in full disclosure document and make the reports publicly available for various stakeholders. In particular, the accountability reports play a role as a tool for people to monitor the government's activities in socioenvironmental issues. This research implies an alternative view in the context of socioenvironmental accounting literature enrichment. It also provides valuable input to other governments, especially in developing countries and countries with economic growth that are highly reliant on the natural resources sector, in order to manage and account for their natural wealth in a more responsible and sustainable manner. Likewise, this research offers an alternative discourse of socioenvironmental accountability from the view of socioenvironmental NGOs in Indonesia.

Details

Environmentalism and NGO Accountability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-002-8

Keywords

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