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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Sari Jusi

The purpose of this paper is to analyse social and environmental sustainability considerations developed in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) and to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse social and environmental sustainability considerations developed in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) and to identify problems and challenges related to sustainable hydropower planning and development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is leaning on empirical analysis based on analysing primary and secondary data and information; official government documents and relevant literature, a series of workshops of the Future Resource and Economy Policies in Laos till 2020 Project (FREPLA2020), and interviews with government officials and experts.

Findings

To achieve its socio‐economic objectives, Lao PDR needs to manage its hydropower development to ensure environmental and social sustainability through developing of the legal, institutional and regulatory environment and strengthening of the institutional capacity of the sector, improving knowledge and data management, and developing institutional coordination across the government agencies.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the Lao government assesses strategically the hydropower development options, prepares capacity building plans, develops risk assessment and management, and learns from past hydropower developments.

Social implications

The paper recommends using hydropower development generated revenues to poverty reduction activities and to strengthen participatory approaches.

Originality/value

The paper can act as a discussion awakener, to help and give some guidance to decision makers and actors in the hydropower sector to integrate sustainable development considerations into hydropower development and planning.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Hanvedes Daovisan and Thanapauge Chamaratana

The purpose of this paper is to understand the sources of financing accumulation that women entrepreneurs of family businesses use for start-up capital in the garment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the sources of financing accumulation that women entrepreneurs of family businesses use for start-up capital in the garment sector of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR).

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents insights gleaned from a qualitative case study into the ways in which women in Lao PDR finance their family businesses in the start-up phase. The authors conducted 36 in-depth interviews – the study used this purposive sample in each of its five rounds of data collection. The data were collected between December 2018 and April 2019 and were analysed by conducting a content analysis assisted by the software programme ATLAS.ti.

Findings

The results, though highly case specific, show Lao women’s ability to: accrue their experience, apply their knowledge, engage in self-employment, support their families and aspire to become entrepreneurs. The findings clearly illustrate that women are opportunity and necessity driven, can accumulate income, possess savings behaviour, can manage working capital, investment and accounting and have access to finance (loan and debt) and thus have the potential to become successful entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

By contextualizing women’s entrepreneurial practices, the paper contributes to an understanding of the sources of financing accumulation used for start-up capital in Vientiane, Lao PDR. Theoretically, the paper extends the knowledge of women entrepreneurs seeking the optimal stock of finance which has the potential to drive family business success.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG7 – Ensure Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-802-5

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Maria Aristizabal-Ramirez and Gustavo Canavire-Bacarreza

Development is a dynamic concept that pertains the evolution of human societies. Over the past few years policy makers, as well as academics, have incorporated a very…

Abstract

Purpose

Development is a dynamic concept that pertains the evolution of human societies. Over the past few years policy makers, as well as academics, have incorporated a very important, yet sometimes neglected, component in the concept of development which is environmental costs and sustainability. One of the key aspects that affects sustainability is energetic consumption, therefore our aim is to determine if changes in oil, coal, and gas, prices during the period 2000–2010 influenced sustainable development.

Methodology/approach

We modified the Human Development Index (HDI) by adding energy consumption component, and propose what we call the Modified Human Sustainable Development Index (HSDI) which captures a broader definition of sustainable development. Then we employ econometric techniques to study the effects of changes in commodity prices on our index in the short run.

Findings

Our results show a nonlinear effect of commodity prices on our index, low and middle-income countries display a positive effect of prices on our HSDI, with smaller effects in the former ones, while high-income countries do not seem to exhibit a significant effect. While low and middle-income countries are typically commodity producers.

Middle-income countries are able to obtain larger benefits in terms of sustainable development due to a better institutional structure which constitutes an opportunity for them in the aftermath of the crisis.

Practical implications

Middle- and low-income countries should design policies that enable them to take advantage of the rises and protect their economies from the falls.

Originality/value

We address the problem of sustainable development and commodity prices in a post-crisi world, which was not reviewed in the literature. In addition we build a measurement of the Human Sustainable Development Index that considers energy consumption as one of its factors. Which is in line with previous results about energy consumption and the Human Development Index.

Details

Lessons from the Great Recession: At the Crossroads of Sustainability and Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-743-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2010

Jamaree Chiengthong

The late incorporation of Lao PDR in the globalized age as an agricultural producer and exporter has been created through the process of “peasantization” and restructuring…

Abstract

The late incorporation of Lao PDR in the globalized age as an agricultural producer and exporter has been created through the process of “peasantization” and restructuring of agricultural upland productive area. The chapter discusses the role of the state and cross-border markets through contract farming in three villages in northern Lao PDR. Contrary to the general belief that economic globalization will result in the weakening of the state, the chapter argues that the state still has a significant role to play. Being late in the corporation into the world market, the changes that take place become very intense.

Details

From Community to Consumption: New and Classical Themes in Rural Sociological Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-281-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Ruth Banomyong

Lao PDR, as the sole land‐locked country in South East Asia, is dependent upon available infrastructure in neighbouring countries for fast and efficient import of goods…

Abstract

Lao PDR, as the sole land‐locked country in South East Asia, is dependent upon available infrastructure in neighbouring countries for fast and efficient import of goods. The validity of a cost model for multimodal transport, which was originally proposed by Beresford and Dubey (1990) and developed by Beresford (1999), is tested against a real case in international logistics, namely the import of wine from Marseilles in France to Vientiane in Lao PDR. The main elements of the model are as follows: cost, time, distance, transport mode and intermodal transfer. The model is tested using real data over a series of alternative routes between Marseilles and Vientiane. The selection of appropriate international logistics system will have a direct impact on the efficiency of Lao PDR import channels. The research findings clearly demonstrate that the “sea‐road” combination via Danang Port in Vietnam is the most competitive in terms of costs while the “sea‐rail‐road” option via port Klang in Malaysia and through Thailand offers the fastest transit time.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Anna Strutt, Thomas W. Hertel and Susan Stone

This chapter uses a global trade model, supplemented with household survey data, to explore the potential impact of ASEAN trade liberalization on poverty in Cambodia, Lao

Abstract

This chapter uses a global trade model, supplemented with household survey data, to explore the potential impact of ASEAN trade liberalization on poverty in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Vietnam. Our tentative results suggest that ASEAN liberalization is likely to bring substantial gains to the region and lead to significant reductions in poverty. In a simulation of full removal of intra-ASEAN tariffs, we find 320,000 people are moved out of extreme poverty, with a further 1.4 million lifted above the $2 per day poverty line. Poverty reductions are particularly significant in the case of agricultural and rural diversified households and for Cambodia. Under broader ASEAN+3 and ASEAN+6 liberalizations, we find a similar pattern of poverty reduction and the overall reduction in poverty is much higher.

Details

New Developments in Computable General Equilibrium Analysis for Trade Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-142-9

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Dalivone Xayavongsa and Piriya Pholphirul

Does delay of gratification affect the probability of engaging in self-employment and does it contribute to business performance? This paper aims to quantify impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

Does delay of gratification affect the probability of engaging in self-employment and does it contribute to business performance? This paper aims to quantify impacts of delay of gratification on engaging in self-employment and business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Lao PDR as a representative of least developed countries, the authors analyze nationally representative survey data from the Lao PDR – STEP Skills Measurement Household Survey and estimate the binary logit/probit model to quantify impacts of delay of gratification on probability of self-employment. And, the impacts of delayed gratification on business performance of the self-employed individuals are also estimated.

Findings

Those with a lower degree of delayed gratification tend to elect to be self-employed instead of being full-time employees. However, a higher delay of gratification score is found to positively correlate with higher business performance among those who are self-employed. Other control variables such as business characteristics, education level and skills of the self-employed also play an important role in higher business performance.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis from this paper still shows some weak points and limitations. First, the data set on self-employment has little representation from industry and the service sector and lacks many important variables such as parents’ characteristics and working hours. Second, there is no clear measurement of delay of gratification, as the measurements use only hypothesis money. Finally, there is a lack of studies to back up the result of delay of gratification on business performance, especially in a least developed country such as Lao PDR. The authors suggest that future research be conducted with richer data regarding the self-employed in industries and services. It would be quite interesting to study further the effect of delay of gratification along with grit, another behavioral variable, on business performance.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, it is therefore crucial that the Lao Government support a policy that helps strengthen both cognitive and noncognitive skills and the delay of gratification along with education to make Lao self-employment more productive.

Social implications

Providing the self-employed with adequate skills to succeed in their enterprises can lead them and the nation to escape the poverty trap. Family, school and government should promote delay of gratification among young children. Encouraging special activities that foster emotional and behavioral skills learning and practice for children, such as religious learning and meditation, might boost their ability to delay gratification. Moreover, support for skills training, both basic and job-relevant skills, could promote business experience exchange by creating an organization that provides guidelines, information and advice for self-employment.

Originality/value

Even though there is extensive research indicating that delayed gratification exists in many contexts, there are very few studies investigating the impact of delayed gratification on the business, especially on the decision to be self-employed and the resulting business performance. The delay of gratification could be one factor that influences decisions on job selection or employment status and that influences business performance as well. This paper is also the first one conducted in a least developed country such as Lao PDR.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Ruth Banomyong and Anthony K.C. Beresford

This paper explores the various alternative routes and methods available to garment exporters in Lao PDR, a land‐locked country in South East Asia, when exporting to the…

Abstract

This paper explores the various alternative routes and methods available to garment exporters in Lao PDR, a land‐locked country in South East Asia, when exporting to the European Union. Lao exporters are dependent on the transport systems in place in neighbouring countries (i.e. Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore) for transit purposes. A multimodal transport cost‐model is used to illustrate and clarify multimodal transport routeing alternatives. A confidence index is also introduced for each route, transport modes and nodal links. Five routeing alternatives are presented in this paper and it is shown that the most frequently utilised route via Bangkok (Thailand) is not necessarily the most competitive in terms of time and cost, while the route via Port Klang (Malaysia) potentially offers a better alternative for Lao garment exporters.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Realm Köhler, Sudathip Sae-tan, Christine Lambert and Hans Konrad Biesalski

Food taboos during pregnancy and the postpartum period have been linked to increased risk of maternal and neonatal death. This paper aims to present plant-based food…

Abstract

Purpose

Food taboos during pregnancy and the postpartum period have been linked to increased risk of maternal and neonatal death. This paper aims to present plant-based food restrictions on Southeast Asian women during pregnancy and after giving birth and the rationale behind such cultural practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Google® Scholar, PubMed and Scopus search using the term food taboo, its synonyms and truncations, in combination with the terms pregnancy, postpartum and breastfeeding, and with the name of the Southeast Asian countries, was conducted from January to February 2017. Articles were included in the review if their full texts were accessible online, in English, published from 2005 to 2016 and if they contained primary data from either quantitative or qualitative method.

Findings

A total of 281 articles were downloaded, and 28 were included in this review. The food taboos and the reasons for avoidance were collated and grouped per their occurrence and according to the country or countries where they are practiced. In total, 14 papers generated data on food taboos during pregnancy, 16 papers on postpartum food taboos and/or 6 on breastfeeding.

Research limitations/implications

This review pools together relevant information about plant-based food taboos Southeast Asian women adhere to during pregnancy and after giving birth. However, data are absent for some of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries, and there is a need for more research to get up-to-date information on the local women’s adherence to these cultural practices.

Practical implication

The knowledge of these practices can support stakeholders who are contributing to the reduction of maternal and under-five mortality ratios in Southeast Asia.

Originality/value

This is the first review paper on food taboos covering all ASEAN members and highlighting the need for cultural sensitivity to properly address maternal and child health problems in the region.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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