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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Jill Lewis

This chapter lays out the blueprint the Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped followed in meeting the expectations of readers with print…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter lays out the blueprint the Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped followed in meeting the expectations of readers with print disabilities. The chapter also discusses the challenges both state and local public libraries face in meeting the current and future expectations of these clients and presents a scenario of a hybrid service in which state and local public libraries work together to meet client expectations.

Methodology/approach

Reports the process and strategies the library used to reinvent itself as a community-centered institution. Presents possible approaches for a collaborative, inclusive library service by state/federal sponsored and public libraries.

Findings

The Maryland Library successfully met client expectation through creating a community-centered library. Public libraries offer many inclusive services that, combined with the specialized service of a state/federally sponsored library, could provide equitable information access for clients with diverse, individual information needs.

Originality/value

This case study presents a successful library service for a complex, continually changing client population and proposes collaborative partnerships for special and local public libraries.

Details

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities and the Inclusive Future of Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-652-6

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Book part
Publication date: 20 March 2012

Rajib Shaw

Communities are at the core of the risk reduction initiatives, since it is related to their lives and properties. There are different ways of putting the term, community…

Abstract

Communities are at the core of the risk reduction initiatives, since it is related to their lives and properties. There are different ways of putting the term, community based, community centered, community owned, etc. Needless to say, risk reduction initiatives started at the community level. Even before the existence of the states, the communities were the managers and solution providers. They used to take care of themselves individually or collectively. That time, it was not called “community based,” since it was the only option available. After the establishment of the state, the government took the control of disaster risk reduction and failed in several cases. Thus, over the past 30–40 years, the concept of community based or community centered has emerged once again, is now gaining momentum. This means, we are going back to the basics.

Details

Community-Based Disaster Risk Reduction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-868-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Catherine D’Ignazio, Eric Gordon and Elizabeth Christoforetti

The ability to gather, store, and make meaning from large amounts of sensor data is becoming a technological and financial reality for cities. Many of these initiatives…

Abstract

The ability to gather, store, and make meaning from large amounts of sensor data is becoming a technological and financial reality for cities. Many of these initiatives are happening through deals brokered between vendors, developers, and cities. They are made manifest in the environment as infrastructure – invisible to citizens and communities. We assert that in order to have community-centered smart cities, we need to transform sensor data collection and usage from invisible infrastructure into visible and legible interface. In this chapter, we compare two different urban sensing initiatives and examine the methods used for feedback between sensors and people. We question how value gets produced and communicated to citizens in urban sensing projects and what kind of oversight and ethical considerations are necessary. Finally, we make a case for “seamful” interfaces between communities, sensors, and cities that reveal their inner workings for the purposes of civic pedagogy and dialogue.

Details

The Right to the Smart City
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-140-7

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Ahmad Raza, Hasan Sohaib Murad and Muhammad Zakria Zakar

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical interrelationships between poverty, culture and knowledge-based community development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the critical interrelationships between poverty, culture and knowledge-based community development.

Design/methodology/approach

The traditional approaches to the management of poverty such as infrastructure, literacy and economic aid have failed to deliver and ameliorate the lot of common people. The current paper engages in critical constructivist discourse on poverty as unfolding in the era of knowledge economy and seeks to propose a community focussed knowledge-based development model of human economic and social uplift. This model has three dimensions: community knowledge focus, interactions of local, regional and global knowledge shaping and influencing poverty management and finally collective responsibility (collective commitment) of groups to rid them of poverty trap.

Findings

First, this paper looks at the social interconnections of poverty, culture and knowledge-based development in a critical discourse context. Second, it discusses the alternative worldviews of economic development. Third, it questions current epistemological and sociological assumptions of development paradigm.

Originality/value

The paper looks at the issues of poverty, culture and economic development from a critical pluralistic epistemological standpoint. It also questions some of the prescriptive methods of development by poverty experts. It also proposes to effectively explore and integrate different cognitive styles in development discourse and their usefulness and relevance to global development discourse.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Sofiane Sahraoui

An IT rationalist discourse predominates in the e‐government literature. Furthermore, and whenever an alternative and holistic discourse is developed, e‐government…

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Abstract

Purpose

An IT rationalist discourse predominates in the e‐government literature. Furthermore, and whenever an alternative and holistic discourse is developed, e‐government evaluation remains mechanistic. E‐inclusion is rightfully advocated as a socially inclusive strategy for e‐government planning and development but it is erroneously considered as a further stage of e‐government development, following the fourth and transactional stage. The paper aims to reconfigure e‐government and e‐inclusion as two parallel processes of government intervention to support a socially inclusive development strategy through a national IT strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the general discourse surrounding e‐government development and implementation, highlighting its mechanistic underpinnings and contrasting it with an inclusive approach to e‐government. The mechanistic discourse of e‐government is analyzed through key constructs that underlie the e‐government concept. Vision and objectives, e‐government evaluation, e‐government models and the enabling role of ICT will be analyzed in view of sorting out the predominance of a mechanistic theme in their elaboration. The synthesis part of this work introduces e‐inclusion based on a more organic and community‐centered approach to e‐government in light of the insufficiencies earlier identified.

Findings

Whilst e‐inclusion provides a good platform to pinpoint insufficiencies of the predominant mechanistic approach to e‐government, it remains doubtful whether it could be achieved within the realm of e‐government programs alone.

Practical implications

Models, roadmaps and strategies for e‐inclusion should explicitly outline the premises for a socially inclusive e‐government and not consider e‐inclusion as a further and mechanical stage of the e‐government stage model. E‐government evaluation has to pinpoint the inclusion aspects of existing projects by going beyond mechanistic measurements.

Originality/value

This paper questions a major assumption in the e‐government literature, namely that e‐inclusion follows e‐government. By drawing from the political science literature, it identifies a niche for e‐inclusion which helps reconceptualize it as socially inclusive government rather than a further stage of e‐government.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2019

Kathleen Campana and Naresh Kumar Agarwal

This paper aims to review the landscape of research in pedagogy and learning that surmounts the challenges of low-tech, information-rich environments during the past…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the landscape of research in pedagogy and learning that surmounts the challenges of low-tech, information-rich environments during the past decade. It also reviews the methods used, populations studied and places where such research was carried out and proposes a conceptual framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review methodology was used to provide initial, broad insight into the field of learning in low tech environments.

Findings

The study found that low tech was not a barrier when it came to effectiveness of pedagogy and learning. In addition, it became apparent that active learning strategies combined with no-tech, low-tech and high-tech resources and strategies can lead to learning environments that are learner-centered, knowledge-centered, assessment-centered and community-centered.

Originality/value

The authors propose the framework for learning in low-tech, information-rich environments, which can be used by researchers, educators, practitioners and policymakers in environments with low technology, or in those with high technology seeking to transfer expertise and technology to these areas.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Sarah Ann Long

Examines the unique funding and service model of a successful community‐centered library.

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318

Abstract

Purpose

Examines the unique funding and service model of a successful community‐centered library.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces the history and demographics of San Miguel de Allende, a city in Mexico with a large English speaking population, and outlines how the library maintains its role as community centre.

Findings

The San Miguel de Allende library thrives through careful attention to the demographics of the community, an innovative and aggressive approach to funding issues, and an awareness of the need for change. The library collection is the largest bilingual privately funded, publicly accessible library in Mexico. This, along with an extensive scholarship and outreach program to students in both rural and urban areas, is funded by a diverse array of revenue generating efforts including a weekly newspaper, weekly sale of books and household items, a café and gift shop.

Originality/value

The San Miguel de Allende Library models how creativity, strong community responsive and lack of fear of change can build and sustain libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Julie Biando Edwards

In 2015, the UN General Assembly introduced the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In 2014, in anticipation of the SDGs, the International Federation of Library…

Abstract

In 2015, the UN General Assembly introduced the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In 2014, in anticipation of the SDGs, the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) released the Lyon Declaration, asserting that the right to access information, and the skills to use it, is essential for development. Simply put, there can be no sustainable development without access to information. So, as the world looks toward sustainable development in the information age, what role should libraries play in meeting communities’ needs? Sustainable development, whether on a local or global scale, requires that people have access to information in order to improve their abilities to make informed choices about their lives, livelihoods, and communities. Sustainable development is important for all communities, everywhere, and access to information is just one way libraries can contribute to development initiatives. Libraries, especially public libraries, provide not only traditional access to information but also engaged services and programs that are community centered. This chapter will explore the ways in which the profession at large is plugging into the SDGs, with a particular focus on the work that IFLA is doing to connect libraries to development. It will highlight a specific form of community development – Asset-Based Community Development, which focuses on using the strengths and capacities that already exist in communities of all sizes and economic statuses – as a theoretical and practical model to help librarians understand and leverage their own assets as they collaborate with their communities on building individual and community capacity. It will argue that an asset-based approach to integrating our services into the larger trend of sustainable community development can provide us with both direction for day-to-day engagement with our communities and an important way to reimagine our value.

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Andrej Svorenčík

Economics laboratories have become the primary locations of experimental economics research by the 1990s. They were a result of a decade long development from ad hoc…

Abstract

Economics laboratories have become the primary locations of experimental economics research by the 1990s. They were a result of a decade long development from ad hoc opportune places to dedicated, purpose designed spaces. The distinctive feature of the economics laboratory and its key instrument became networked computers running custom-built software. However, the history of the economics laboratory is not just a history of evolving technology. I argue in this article that it is mainly a history of learning how to build an experimental economics community. Only a functioning community was able to change a physical place to a laboratory space. The distinction between place and space originates in the work of Michael de Certeau and I use it to analyze the evolution of economics laboratories. To this end, I analyze the case of Austin Hoggatt’s Management Science Laboratory at Berkeley in the 1960s as it illustrates the indispensability of creating a community centered on the laboratory. In contrast, the laboratories in Arizona and at Caltech since the 1980s, and in Amsterdam since the 1990s have become successful spaces, because, unlike Hoggatt, they focused equally on community building as on infrastructure and technology. This gave rise to social infrastructure and division of labor in the laboratory space.

Details

Including a Symposium on Mary Morgan: Curiosity, Imagination, and Surprise
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-423-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2019

H Jing, L. Zhimin and S. Ying

Renovation philosophy and residential construction mode are key problems encountered in the renovation of urban villages in China. Existing research fruits on renovation…

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0

Abstract

Renovation philosophy and residential construction mode are key problems encountered in the renovation of urban villages in China. Existing research fruits on renovation philosophy, and policies consider fairness and efficiency and cover-sharing research consensus. However, research on residential construction mode in renovation still faces challenges, such as weak relevant policy pertinence, insufficient objective references, and poor universality. In this study, the changes of the architectural spaces of a typical urban village community in Xi'an City from the beginning to the end of the renovation were discussed. The space requirements of different user groups were analyzed and summarized, and then adapted to the different types of building spaces. In addition, the residential construction model applicable to the inclusive renovation philosophy was established. Research results corroborated that the renovation of urban village should refer to its functional orientations in the community. The community-centered renovation residential district should also meet the requirements of different user groups in the community, including residential, living, and entertainment functions. Community-subcentered residential district should meet the space demands of residential and living functions. Community-subordinated residential district meets space demands of internal residents for residential and living. Moreover, residential district space is relieved by combining practical and certain spatial factors. In this research, the building space compositions of different user groups were reviewed and refined in the “bottom-up” pattern. Research conclusions provide design references for the practical renovation of urban villages.

Details

Open House International, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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