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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Chris Procter

The purpose of this paper is to explain how employability and entrepreneurship embedded in the practice of professional placements in a large UK Business School, grounded…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how employability and entrepreneurship embedded in the practice of professional placements in a large UK Business School, grounded in literature and research concerning the relationship between professional experience and employability. It explores possible further developments of this practice into student entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the relevant literature and then describes the operation of the scheme in practice. It identifies relevant problems and discusses opportunities for both development and research.

Findings

Professional experience is of immense value to both students and the organisations that host them. Despite reluctance on the part of some of these two key stakeholders, it has the potential for further expansion in terms of number of students on placement, their location, their experience and integrating placements with entrepreneurship education.

Practical implications

Organisations may see the benefit of employing students on one year or shorter contracts. Universities not currently offering professional placements within the curriculum to their students may wish to adopt best practice and those that are already involved may wish to consider the optional/compulsory element of the placement experience in order to address the reticence of many students to secure this experience. The paper suggests solutions to the well‐established question “Can entrepreneurship be taught?” by investigating the idea of Enterprise Placements.

Originality/value

The paper helps to explain, in a practical way, the opportunities and problems associated with the implementation of a placement scheme in the context of relevant literature.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Sue Huntington, John Stephen and Brenda M. Oldfield

This paper provides a discussion on the implementation of formal assessment of work placement within a retail sandwich degree at the Manchester Metropolitan University…

Abstract

This paper provides a discussion on the implementation of formal assessment of work placement within a retail sandwich degree at the Manchester Metropolitan University. Outlines the Retail Marketing degree and placement programme. Explains the key components of placement assessment: professional practice; personal skills and the placement project. Concludes that successful assessment relies on careful briefing and preparation of students prior to placement and close liaison between placement tutor, employer and student during the sandwich period.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Gillian Fowler and Susanne Tietze

Discusses sandwich placements and their importance at Sheffield Hallam University. Outlines the Business Studies degree programme and the assessment procedure of work…

Abstract

Discusses sandwich placements and their importance at Sheffield Hallam University. Outlines the Business Studies degree programme and the assessment procedure of work placements, mentioning its role in final degree assessment. Lists problems of assessment, and criticisms from the employers’ points of view. Finally, provides a framework for a new programme based on both the competence approach and a survey of placement companies.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Peter J. Smith, Jennifer Dalton and Robyn Dolheguy

Using a sample of 446 secondary students who had participated in a vocational education and training in school (VETiS) program, compares the experiences and perceptions of…

Abstract

Using a sample of 446 secondary students who had participated in a vocational education and training in school (VETiS) program, compares the experiences and perceptions of students who had undertaken a work placement with those who had not. Shows that students who had participated in work placement enjoyed the VETiS experience more than those who had not, and that the work placement had assisted them in their decision whether to stay at school or not. A factor analysis of results showed a factor associated with self‐confidence about employability, and a factor associated with assistance in achieving specific post‐school employment. Students who had completed a work placement were significantly higher on both these factors than students who had not. Results are consistent with other research in the field, and it is argued that the work placement experience plays a considerable part in developing student agency in the decisions and the journey that they make in their transition from school to work.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Anthony John Beard

Argues the hypothesis that practical placements for students oflibrarianship are especially problematic as the student, often straightfrom school, needs experience of the…

Abstract

Argues the hypothesis that practical placements for students of librarianship are especially problematic as the student, often straight from school, needs experience of the “world of work” and its expectations as well as specifically library and information work. These two needs may conflict, resulting in demotivation for students and frustration for the host. Describes the placement pattern at UNL School of Information and Communications Studies and discusses how it is seen to address these problems: a short first placement in the second year helps to acclimatize the student to the expectations of the workplace, while the second, longer placement in the third year, linked closely to a management module, focuses the student′s attention on the specifics of work in a library or information unit.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Anne Marie Thake

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate short-term, unpaid placements offered to students reading for a degree in public policy. They provide added value to their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate short-term, unpaid placements offered to students reading for a degree in public policy. They provide added value to their tertiary education experience. Elective placements were offered in 2012 and became a mandatory requirement for students reading for a three-year bachelor of commerce degree in public policy in 2018. To date, no research has been carried out on these placements and this may serve as a model for a post-evaluation assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from students who undertook placements, embedded in the public policy undergraduate programme. A document analysis of selected student and placement provider's reports was carried out to complement the students' responses to an online questionnaire.

Findings

Placements are of value to students as they served as an introduction to the working world. They enable students to establish connections with the course content and carry out research. They were exposed to real-life situations, developing their knowledge, acquiring soft skills and learning new tools, sought after by employers. These placements were valued as a route to graduate employment tailor-made to the degree's requirements. Students were able to embark on a soul-searching, introspective discovery and journey which made them mature and shed light in the direction of future work prospects.

Research limitations/implications

Placements give students the opportunity to gain insights into real-work environments and are able to link theories learnt in the class-room with real-life situations. Placements have positive implications on students adjusting to their work life easily after graduation. The limitations are that the sample size was small and that the reflective reports which were randomly selected may not have necessarily been representative of the full complement.

Practical implications

The practical implications are that the placements system and process can easily be implemented and replicated in other academic disciplines and universities as a compulsory component of their studies.

Social implications

Placements gave students the opportunity to reflect on their learning, develop non-technical skills and enhance their confidence levels. They were also able to network and communicate with different employees.

Originality/value

Placements provided exposure to relevant organisations and personal enrichment in terms of acquiring skills, autonomy and independence. Students with placement experience are also more likely to secure future employment, relevant to their undergraduate degree.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Bob Pymm and Primoz Juznic

This paper aims to report on the outcomes of a survey of organisations in Australia and Slovenia hosting undergraduate Library and Information Studies (LIS) students on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the outcomes of a survey of organisations in Australia and Slovenia hosting undergraduate Library and Information Studies (LIS) students on professional placement to better understand the reasons behind organisations accepting students, the workload implications and their satisfaction with the process.

Design/methodology/approach

Hosting organisations were asked to complete a survey on various aspects of the placement process.

Findings

For both countries, hosts reported favourably on their experience, and virtually, all felt that while it was a real commitment of time and resources on their part, it was a responsibility they were happy to take on. There was little difference between the two cohorts, suggesting that the findings from this research may be an accurate picture of the situation for LIS placements hosts more generally. The positive view of the placement and the belief in its role in LIS education is further strengthened by this study.

Research limitations/implications

The research suggests that hosting students is not seen as an onerous task, but one which brings benefits to both parties. This will be useful in promoting student placements when looking for new host opportunities.

Originality/value

This study has added to the limited literature in the LIS field on the experience of host organisations. Obtaining similar results across two countries added to the reliability of the findings which will help inform those planning future student placements.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Francis D. Walsh and Seán Byrne

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research methodology involving problem diagnosis, intervention planning, action and evaluation is employed. The diagnosis involved a survey of 130 employers that had taken students on placement during the first two years of the placement programme. The action research also involved workshops with the work placement team and the making of an intervention with respect to enhancing the placement process through the introduction of a Priority Partner initiative for 26 of the employers.

Findings

The survey findings reveal differences in the ranking of importance of college selection criteria by employers, as well the impact of the placement manager's characteristics on the placement process. The intervention findings show that the employer retention percentage increased for the Priority Partners but remained the same for the other employers.

Research limitations/implications

The study reports qualitative findings in the context of a placement programme in one institution which limits external validity.

Practical implications

Employer retention would seem to be improved with the development of a customer relations management orientation with employers. The role of the placement manager is pivotal to enhancing the retention of employers as is the quality and professionalism of the work placement service.

Originality/value

New empirical data extends the very limited understanding of company retention on work placement programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Arthur Morgan and David Turner

This article reviews the opportunity provided by the work placement year for human resource management students to gain professional membership of the Chartered Institute…

Abstract

This article reviews the opportunity provided by the work placement year for human resource management students to gain professional membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (CIPD). A case study approach is used to reflect on findings related to the first two cohorts. It concludes that the benefits of the opportunity to gain a separate professional qualification are twofold. First, it ties in closely with what appears is a more strategic career decision‐making process on behalf of the student and, second, the CIPD qualification provides a robust framework for the placement period during this important stage of student studies.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Shona M. Morse

The objective of the pilot study reported on here was to identify some of the more elusive “costs and benefits” of work‐based learning (WBL) placements. This was addressed…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the pilot study reported on here was to identify some of the more elusive “costs and benefits” of work‐based learning (WBL) placements. This was addressed by exploring the views and experience of a small number of human resource development (HRD) professionals who currently offer supervised work‐based learning placements to full‐time post‐graduate HRD students.

Design/methodology/approach

The small qualitative study outlined was a pilot, focused initially on the perceptions of one set of stakeholders within the placement process, the HRD professionals. By means of questionnaires and interviews the participants were invited to reflect on their interpretation of the tangible and intangible costs and benefits to the organisation, the supervisor/mentor, the student and the university.

Findings

The findings imply that there are a number of non‐financial costs and benefits that may not be widely recognised but which may have significance when seeking/agreeing placement opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small‐scale study, and may have limited transferability.

Practical implications

In due course the study will be extended to examine the perspectives of other stakeholders.

Originality/value

Evidence from the literature suggests that obtaining and sustaining good quality WBL placements can be difficult. A reflection on potential “non standard” costs and benefits may assist organisations to weigh up these more ephemeral but potentially important factors and aid decision‐making about the viability and desirability of offering WBL placements and at the same time develop awareness of non‐standard costs and benefits amongst those seeking to set up placements for their students.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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