Search results

1 – 10 of over 18000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Anne Marie Thake

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate short-term, unpaid placements offered to students reading for a degree in public policy. They provide added value to their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate short-term, unpaid placements offered to students reading for a degree in public policy. They provide added value to their tertiary education experience. Elective placements were offered in 2012 and became a mandatory requirement for students reading for a three-year bachelor of commerce degree in public policy in 2018. To date, no research has been carried out on these placements and this may serve as a model for a post-evaluation assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from students who undertook placements, embedded in the public policy undergraduate programme. A document analysis of selected student and placement provider's reports was carried out to complement the students' responses to an online questionnaire.

Findings

Placements are of value to students as they served as an introduction to the working world. They enable students to establish connections with the course content and carry out research. They were exposed to real-life situations, developing their knowledge, acquiring soft skills and learning new tools, sought after by employers. These placements were valued as a route to graduate employment tailor-made to the degree's requirements. Students were able to embark on a soul-searching, introspective discovery and journey which made them mature and shed light in the direction of future work prospects.

Research limitations/implications

Placements give students the opportunity to gain insights into real-work environments and are able to link theories learnt in the class-room with real-life situations. Placements have positive implications on students adjusting to their work life easily after graduation. The limitations are that the sample size was small and that the reflective reports which were randomly selected may not have necessarily been representative of the full complement.

Practical implications

The practical implications are that the placements system and process can easily be implemented and replicated in other academic disciplines and universities as a compulsory component of their studies.

Social implications

Placements gave students the opportunity to reflect on their learning, develop non-technical skills and enhance their confidence levels. They were also able to network and communicate with different employees.

Originality/value

Placements provided exposure to relevant organisations and personal enrichment in terms of acquiring skills, autonomy and independence. Students with placement experience are also more likely to secure future employment, relevant to their undergraduate degree.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Ugochukwu Chinonso Okolie, Chinedu Ochinanwata, Nonso Ochinanwata, Paul Agu Igwe and Gloria Obiageli Okorie

This study investigates the relationship between perceived supervisor support (PSS) and learner career curiosity and tests the mediating role of sense of belonging…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between perceived supervisor support (PSS) and learner career curiosity and tests the mediating role of sense of belonging, engagement and learning self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a three-wave repeated cross-sectional data collected from 509 final-year undergraduate students of 11 Nigerian public universities, who had completed the compulsory work placement to analyze the influence of PSS on learner’s career curiosity via a parallel mediation involving sense of belonging, engagement (behavioural, emotional and cognitive) and self-efficacy.

Findings

The results show that engagement mediates the path through which PSS influences career curiosity. However, the authors found no evidence that sense of belonging and self-efficacy mediated the relationship between PSS and learner’s career curiosity in this population.

Originality/value

The findings of this study highlight the importance of PSS as a resource that influences learner’s career curiosity, particularly during a work placement.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Kate Bramford and Anne L. Eason

This study aims to explore the views of criminal justice and allied sector organisations and agencies, of why they provide placements for the Applied Criminology programme…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the views of criminal justice and allied sector organisations and agencies, of why they provide placements for the Applied Criminology programme at the University of Worcester, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took a qualitative approach to tease out the underlying contributory factors that featured in the decision to offer placements. It used semi-structured interviews of key personnel, and thematic analysis was subsequently undertaken on the data collected.

Findings

Several themes emerged, in particular reciprocal learning, dynamism, employability and social investment. These appeared to be the most impactful on the organisation in relation to the future recruitment of staff as well as the enhancement of current staff practice.

Research limitations/implications

Based upon the scale of the research, the findings may have limited transferability.

Practical implications

There is a hidden benefit to organisations, which could be capitalised upon as a reciprocal learning process, which enhances practice and therefore outcomes.

Social implications

Stereotypes are challenged, resulting in students overcoming preconceived ideas about particular service user groups.

Originality/value

Whilst research into work-based learning and the benefits of placements for students is not new, research enquiring as to why organisations are prepared to offer placements remains in its infancy.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Arthur Morgan and David Turner

This article reviews the opportunity provided by the work placement year for human resource management students to gain professional membership of the Chartered Institute…

Abstract

This article reviews the opportunity provided by the work placement year for human resource management students to gain professional membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (CIPD). A case study approach is used to reflect on findings related to the first two cohorts. It concludes that the benefits of the opportunity to gain a separate professional qualification are twofold. First, it ties in closely with what appears is a more strategic career decision‐making process on behalf of the student and, second, the CIPD qualification provides a robust framework for the placement period during this important stage of student studies.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Matt Edwards

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between work placements and employability, through an analysis of the impact of a work placement on students…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between work placements and employability, through an analysis of the impact of a work placement on students’ self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The basis of this paper is a large-scale work-based learning module at the University of Birmingham, the “Professional Development Module”. Students completed questionnaires both before and after they undertaken their placements and the results from the questionnaires were compared. These results were then combined with the results of semi-structured interviews undertaken with students.

Findings

The paper's findings support the view that a work placement has a positive impact on students’ self-efficacy, especially in relation to their confidence in making applications and/or attending interviews, and in articulating their skills and strengths.

Research limitations/implications

While the relatively small sample size means that the paper's conclusions must remain provisional, it highlights the need for careers practitioners to encourage students to engage in critical self-reflection. The paper suggests that it is important for careers practitioners and researchers to engage in more collaborative projects in order for a fully rounded picture of the relationship between placements and employability to emerge. The paper shows that more research is needed into the relative impact of short- and long-term placements.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the value of assessing students’ views both before and after their work placements so that these views can be compared directly.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Shona M. Morse

The objective of the pilot study reported on here was to identify some of the more elusive “costs and benefits” of work‐based learning (WBL) placements. This was addressed…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the pilot study reported on here was to identify some of the more elusive “costs and benefits” of work‐based learning (WBL) placements. This was addressed by exploring the views and experience of a small number of human resource development (HRD) professionals who currently offer supervised work‐based learning placements to full‐time post‐graduate HRD students.

Design/methodology/approach

The small qualitative study outlined was a pilot, focused initially on the perceptions of one set of stakeholders within the placement process, the HRD professionals. By means of questionnaires and interviews the participants were invited to reflect on their interpretation of the tangible and intangible costs and benefits to the organisation, the supervisor/mentor, the student and the university.

Findings

The findings imply that there are a number of non‐financial costs and benefits that may not be widely recognised but which may have significance when seeking/agreeing placement opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small‐scale study, and may have limited transferability.

Practical implications

In due course the study will be extended to examine the perspectives of other stakeholders.

Originality/value

Evidence from the literature suggests that obtaining and sustaining good quality WBL placements can be difficult. A reflection on potential “non standard” costs and benefits may assist organisations to weigh up these more ephemeral but potentially important factors and aid decision‐making about the viability and desirability of offering WBL placements and at the same time develop awareness of non‐standard costs and benefits amongst those seeking to set up placements for their students.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Louise Manning and Patricia Parrott

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of a workplace placement on the student participants’ self-reported entrepreneurial attitude (EA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of a workplace placement on the student participants’ self-reported entrepreneurial attitude (EA).

Design/methodology/approach

A review of relevant literature informed questions incorporated in the university’s annual feedback questionnaire completed by students (n=461) on return from a work placement of between 44 and 52 weeks.

Findings

The study has shown that both gender and entrepreneurial legacy influence baseline and post-placement EA (p<0.05). The interaction between EA, social learning, perceived behavioural control, subjective norms and perceived relational support was also considered.

Originality/value

This research provides context for further qualitative work in this area, especially the influence of gender and entrepreneurial legacy on reported baseline EA and EA post work placement and will inform pedagogical development in terms of embedding entrepreneurial teaching in future curriculum development at the university.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Nayna Patel, Willem‐Paul Brinkman and Jane Coughlan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and understand whether students who complete a work placement as part of their degree course achieve a better classification of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and understand whether students who complete a work placement as part of their degree course achieve a better classification of degree than those students who do not include a placement.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted by extracting the profiles of computing students from the database of a UK based university. Data collected included the marks and academic performance throughout the course of the students’ degree, educational background, age and gender. In total, the profiles of 290 students were analysed to understand the impact of a work placement on their degree.

Findings

The results show that 58 per cent of those students who had been on a work placement achieved an upper second or first class degree, whereas only 37 per cent of non‐placement students achieved the same academic standards. Furthermore, this study also established that this result is not because work placement students are academically more capable to begin with, as originally believed by many researchers.

Practical implications

Direction for further research would involve investigating different cohorts of students and in different subject areas. However, the initial findings from this study could be used as a starting point in an attempt to encourage students to include a work placement as part of their degree.

Originality/value

Rather than simply performing a comparison of degree classifications between the placement and non‐placement students, this study goes further and investigates student performance during their entire three or four year degree course. Furthermore, this study also considers influences such as age, gender and educational background on the results.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Francis D. Walsh and Seán Byrne

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors relating to retention of employers on an undergraduate work placement programme in a third level institution.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research methodology involving problem diagnosis, intervention planning, action and evaluation is employed. The diagnosis involved a survey of 130 employers that had taken students on placement during the first two years of the placement programme. The action research also involved workshops with the work placement team and the making of an intervention with respect to enhancing the placement process through the introduction of a Priority Partner initiative for 26 of the employers.

Findings

The survey findings reveal differences in the ranking of importance of college selection criteria by employers, as well the impact of the placement manager's characteristics on the placement process. The intervention findings show that the employer retention percentage increased for the Priority Partners but remained the same for the other employers.

Research limitations/implications

The study reports qualitative findings in the context of a placement programme in one institution which limits external validity.

Practical implications

Employer retention would seem to be improved with the development of a customer relations management orientation with employers. The role of the placement manager is pivotal to enhancing the retention of employers as is the quality and professionalism of the work placement service.

Originality/value

New empirical data extends the very limited understanding of company retention on work placement programmes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Stephen Beyer, Andrea Meek and Amy Davies

The Real Opportunities project set out to implement a number of the approaches identified through research that can assist transition to adulthood in nine local authority…

Abstract

Purpose

The Real Opportunities project set out to implement a number of the approaches identified through research that can assist transition to adulthood in nine local authority areas in Wales. Supported work experience was delivered by small job coaching teams in each area. The purpose of this paper is to establish the impact of the work experience and employment teams by describing the placements provided, any change in the skills of young people, and the responses to the placements by employers, young people and their families.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected over 24 months by participating employment services. Questionnaires were administered to employers. Interviews were carried out with a sub-sample of young people (24) participating and a family member (25).

Findings

Over a 24-month period 297 young people received supported work experience. In total, 262 young people had an intellectual disability, 35 an autistic spectrum disorder. Up to three placements were delivered to each person, averaging five weeks per placement, with 405 placements in total. In total, 62 per cent of those with two placements had a different category of second work placement to their first. These numbers demonstrated that work experience in community placements is possible with support. Young people improved work skills significantly between first and second placements. Employers reported high satisfaction rates with the young person’s work in a range of key performance areas and company benefits from participation for other staff, company image and customer relations. Interviews with 24 young people and 25 of their family members reported satisfaction with support and placements. Six young people had paid work now, and 33 per cent said they would get a job at some future time. Families reported changes in young person’s outlook but their view of prospects of employment remained pessimistic due to the external environment.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for future research are discussed.

Practical implications

Implications for transition are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insight into the impact of a large number of supported work experience placements.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 18000