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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Oluseyi Matthew Odebiyi

The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamics of critical thinking for informed action within the frame of six sample US states’ Kindergarten-5 social studies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the dynamics of critical thinking for informed action within the frame of six sample US states’ Kindergarten-5 social studies content standards.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used quantitative content analysis. In addition to describing how the states’ standards present critical thinking for informed action, four variables were included: the enrollment weight of the states, textbook adoption status to advance standards, summative test status for social studies and grade levels.

Findings

The results indicate complex variations in context-based critical thinking levels are required by the sample states’ content standards with an extensive orientation toward superficial contextual thinking.

Originality/value

The study provides a new lens with which to make sense of students’ context-based critical thinking, as it relates to the expectations found in standards. It discusses the implications of the states’ K-5 standards on engaging students in critical thinking.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Francisco Elíseo Fernandes Sanches, Matheus Leite Campos, Luiz Eduardo Gaio and Marcio Marcelo Belli

Higher education institutions (HEIs) should assume their role as leaders in the search for a sustainable future. Consequently, such institutions need to incorporate…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions (HEIs) should assume their role as leaders in the search for a sustainable future. Consequently, such institutions need to incorporate sustainability into their activities. However, this needs to be done holistically and not with isolated and independent actions. Therefore, this study aims to develop a structure of sustainability action archetypes to help HEIs holistically incorporate sustainability in their strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature was conducted focusing on the subject of sustainability in HEIs.

Findings

A structure of sustainability action archetypes for HEIs was proposed. Further, based on scientific literature, examples of actions were presented within each archetype.

Practical implications

This study provides HEI administrators and other organizations with a practical structure to enable the systemic incorporation of sustainability objectives and actions into institutional activities.

Originality/value

This study adapts the tool “sustainable business model archetypes” for a new purpose. This tool was initially developed to classify innovations of sustainable business models.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Yazan Khalid Abed-Allah Migdadi

This study aims to identify the effective operational strategies for airlines in a pandemic that allow them to recover and bounce back smoothly.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the effective operational strategies for airlines in a pandemic that allow them to recover and bounce back smoothly.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted quantitative methodology based on secondary data published by the airlines related to operational and performance indicators. The total number of airlines surveyed was 145. The sample of study covers all the following regions: Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, North America and South America. The data analysis of this research passed through several phases to compare the situation before and during pandemic period.

Findings

The effective operational strategy patterns during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic comprise three hybrid strategies and one scheduling strategy. It appears from these strategy models that four strategic alternatives are available for international airlines to adopt, while two strategic alternatives are available for regional airlines. The strategy alternatives for regional and international airlines are all effective, but those of the international airlines are the more effective ones.

Originality/value

Previous studies rarely adopted the theory of operations strategy configuration (emphasizing taxonomies-based perspective) and the organizational resilience theory (emphasizing capability-based perspective) to identify the effective airlines operations strategy patterns in a pandemic, that allow airlines to recover and bounce back smoothly by analyzing the practices of airlines from different geographic regions worldwide.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Ziyuan Zhou and Chuqing Dong

Despite corporate social advocacy (CSA) has become a popular phenomenon, less is known about the potential negative public responses to corporations' CSA involvement and…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite corporate social advocacy (CSA) has become a popular phenomenon, less is known about the potential negative public responses to corporations' CSA involvement and promotion. This paper aims to investigate the main and conditional effects of a new concept, CSA stance-action consistency, on consumers' negative responses to CSA communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a 4 (four types of CSA stance-action consistency) × 2 (CSA record: long vs short) between-subject experimental design. Social issue activism was measured as a continuous variable and treated as a moderator. An online experiment was conducted with participants recruited from MTurk (n = 224).

Findings

CSA stance-action consistency significantly predicted negative word-of-mouth and boycott intention. Participants' social issue activism moderated the effects. However, CSA record was not a significant predictor of consumers' negative responses to CSA communication.

Originality/value

This study advances CSA and corporate communication literature by proposing a new concept, CSA stance-action consistency and providing empirical evidence on its effects on consumer responses. Practical implications to CSA promotion were discussed.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Kyle Turner, Craig A. Turner and William H. Heise

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and test a portfolio view of a firm’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Drawing from stakeholder theory and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce and test a portfolio view of a firm’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. Drawing from stakeholder theory and the dynamic capabilities literature, the authors introduce CSR portfolio diversity and dynamism as key portfolio characteristics that have differential impacts across short- and long-term performance contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws from the Kinder, Lydenberg and Domini database to examine CSR portfolio diversity and dynamism across seven dimensions of CSR activities. The authors test the direct and indirect relationships between CSR portfolio characteristics and both short- and long-term performance outcomes to assess the opportunities and challenges associated with managing a diverse and dynamic CSR portfolio.

Findings

The findings suggest that a diverse portfolio of CSR activities positively impacts long-term performance; however, CSR portfolio diversity yields negative performance outcomes in the short-term. The authors also find that CSR portfolio dynamism moderates the relationship between CSR level and firm performance, such that a dynamic portfolio of CSR positively moderates the relationship between a firm’s CSR level and long-term performance; however, it negatively moderates the relationship between CSR level and short-term performance.

Originality/value

This study integrates insights from the literature that examine the independent effects of individual CSR activities and the broader perspective that assesses the aggregated summation of CSR activities in relation to firm performance. By taking a portfolio perspective, the present study provides a unique integration of these two research streams to examine the performance implications of engaging in a diverse and dynamic range of CSR activities.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Richard Beach and Limarys Caraballo

Unlike formalist and functional approaches to literacy and teaching writing, a languaging theory approach centers on the dynamic and interpersonal nature of writing. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike formalist and functional approaches to literacy and teaching writing, a languaging theory approach centers on the dynamic and interpersonal nature of writing. The purpose of this study was to determine students’ ability to engage in explicit reflection about their languaging actions in response to their personal narrative writing to determine those types of actions they were most versus less likely to focus on for enacting relations with others, as well as how they applied their reflections to subsequent interactions with others.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study, thirty seven 12th grade students were asked to write personal narratives and then reflect in writing on their use of languaging actions in their narratives based on specific prompts. Students’ explicit reflections about their narratives were coded based on their reference to seven different types of languaging actions for enacting relations with others.

Findings

Students were most likely to focus their reflections on making connections, understandings, collaboration and support by and for others as well as expression of emotions, getting feelings out, sharing issues; followed by references to conflicts, arguing, stress, negative perceptions or exclusion; references to ideas or impressions about ethics, respect, values, morals; use of “insider language;” slang, jargon, dialects; use of humor, joking, parody; and references to adult and authorities’ perceptions or influences.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to students’ portrayals of their languaging actions through writing as opposed to observations of their lived-world interactions with others.

Practical implications

These results suggest the value of having students engage in explicit reflections about their languaging actions portrayed in narratives as contributing to their growth in use of languaging actions for enacting relations with others.

Social implications

Students’ ability to reflect on their language actions enhances their ability to enact social relations.

Originality/value

A languaging perspective provides an alternative approach for analyzing reflections on types of languaging actions.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Kyle Turner, Matthew C. Harris, T. Russell Crook and Annette L. Ranft

The purpose of this study is to integrate research on competitive and cooperative repertoires and to simultaneously assess the direct, indirect and curvilinear effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to integrate research on competitive and cooperative repertoires and to simultaneously assess the direct, indirect and curvilinear effects of competitive and cooperative action repertoires in relation to firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The analyses are conducted using a longitudinal dual-industry sample of publicly traded firms, including over 6,500 competitive actions and 750 cooperative actions. The authors use fixed effects (FE) regression models to test the diminishing returns of action volume on firm performance as well as the moderating effects of action diversity.

Findings

The results suggest that increasing competitive and cooperative actions yields diminishing returns in relation to firm performance. Furthermore, in the context of competitive action repertoire diversity, increased diversity magnifies the diminishing returns of competitive action volume on firm performance.

Originality/value

The study provides a firm-level conceptualization of overall competitive and cooperative repertoires to extend the literature on competition and cooperation beyond dyadic interactions or structural determinants of competitive and cooperative actions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Davide Giacomini, Mattia Martini, Alessandro Sancino, Paola Zola and Dario Cavenago

This paper aims to analyse stakeholder sentiment about the corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions implemented by Italian companies between February 20, 2020 and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse stakeholder sentiment about the corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions implemented by Italian companies between February 20, 2020 and April 20, 2020, which was the first peak in the outbreak of the COVID-19 health emergency in Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using sentiment analysis, the impact of COVID-19 on CSR actions is analysed through reactions to the news published on Twitter by a sample of Italian news agencies.

Findings

The analysis indicates that the actions most appreciated are those that are more radical, e.g. where the company has converted part of its production to make goods that are useful in dealing with the COVID-19 emergency. The study identifies a new category of actions definable as “crisis-shaped CSR.”

Practical implications

This is one of the first studies concerning the effects of the pandemic on both CSR actions and organizational legitimacy.

Originality/value

This work explains which strategic approach to CSR is the most effective in supporting corporate reputation in times of crisis, this study identified which of the CSR initiatives adopted by companies in Italy were more effective in stimulating positive interactions and sentiment among the general public.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Antonina Tsvetkova

This study explores how human actions affect existing supply chain management (SCM) practice.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores how human actions affect existing supply chain management (SCM) practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a narrative approach, this qualitative in-depth case study looks at micro-human activities in SCM practices in the Russian Arctic. Data from personal observations, 13 semi-structured interviews and archival materials are interpreted through the concepts of institutional work and institutional logics.

Findings

The study reveals how human actions and institutions affect each other and change existing SCM practice constrained by institutional order and logics. The findings identify two forms of institutional work, initiated by the presence of conflicts of interest between practitioners engaged in different organisational routines, that become an essential driver for logic change. Social action, often invisible in practice, is indicated by finding compromises and informal arrangements that shape interactive activity among practitioners. The findings show that changes enacted by human actions in SCM practice have envisioned new forms of collaboration among supply chain members, thereby making supply chains in the Russian Arctic more integrated than before.

Research limitations/implications

This study involves a limited number of supply chain practitioners, making it imperative to study larger samples, specifically from various empirical contexts.

Originality/value

This study suggests an alternative approach focusing on SCM practice as consistent patterns of human actions, to reflect on supply chain integration problems. It provides an understanding of how practitioners are influenced by and active in producing institutional change. An issue of practitioners' responsibility and morality regarding the consequences of their decisions when exerting change in existing SCM practice is further emphasised.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Jack Andersen

The purpose of this article is to develop a contemporary understanding of genre as digital social action. Particular emphasis will be on archiving, tagging, and searching…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to develop a contemporary understanding of genre as digital social action. Particular emphasis will be on archiving, tagging, and searching as social actions afforded by digital media as a function of their materiality.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is critical analysis and discussion.

Findings

It is shown through an examination and a concrete example of how the genre is understood as digital social action, how the materiality of digital media affords particular communicative actions.

Originality/value

The article contributes with an understanding of the genre as digital social action consisting of two communicating parts: users’ actions and materiality.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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