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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Geoff Willis, Stefan E. Genchev and Haozhe Chen

Supply chain flexibility has been acknowledged as a necessity in the context of constantly changing operational and service requirements in the global marketplace…

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1137

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain flexibility has been acknowledged as a necessity in the context of constantly changing operational and service requirements in the global marketplace. However, limited research has focused on analyzing and empirically testing the dynamics of achieving enhanced flexibility performance. Drawing upon the knowledge-based view of the firm, the purpose of this paper is to address this research gap by introducing supply chain learning (SCL) and integration as key factors in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in India. Structural equation modeling technique was used as the main analysis method to test the proposed conceptual model on SCL, integration, and flexibility performance.

Findings

Research findings indicate that the supply chain integration construct (in its internal and external dimensions) mediates the proposed SCL-flexibility performance relationship. The analysis also confirms the positive relationship between cross-functional integration and inter-firm integration.

Research limitations/implications

Focusing on only one country may limit the generalizability of the findings. Also, cross-sectional data collection may not be the ideal approach for evaluating the impacts of SCL. Therefore, future research with longitudinal data and in different contexts is warranted to validate the research results of this study.

Originality/value

The proposed conceptual model adds to the limited existing knowledge body of SCL and links SCL, integration, and flexibility performance. It also provides a new venue for future research in this area.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Haozhe Chen, Stefan E. Genchev, Geoff Willis and Benjamin Griffis

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the antecedents and impacts of a largely overlooked concept, employee development, within the challenging area of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the antecedents and impacts of a largely overlooked concept, employee development, within the challenging area of returns management.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed relationships are validated through structural equation modeling analysis with survey data collected in India.

Findings

Combining the ability–motivation–opportunity model in human resource management and the theoretical tenets associated with dynamic capabilities, the authors confirmed that supply chain learning, returns management orientation and information support are important antecedents of returns management employee development. In turn, the findings suggest that, as a dynamic capability, returns management employee development positively impacts a firm’s returns management and market performance.

Practical implications

To successfully tackle the challenges related to handling returns, companies must focus their resources not only on new technologies and related processes, but also on employee training and development as well.

Originality/value

Although recruiting and retaining talent in supply chain management has long been recognized as a serious global challenge, no previous research has empirically studied employee development practices in the returns management context.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

R. Glenn Richey, Stefan E. Genchev and Patricia J. Daugherty

Aims to provide empirical evidence of the relationships between and among reverse logistics, resource commitment, and innovation.

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7021

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to provide empirical evidence of the relationships between and among reverse logistics, resource commitment, and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Mail surveys were sent to members of the Automobile Aftermarket Industry Association, a large trade association. Factor level results followed by between‐item results, as typically reported in general linear modeling and mediated regression, are developed using a split sample methodology. Ultimately, Resource‐Advantage Theory provided the framework for examining the impact of developing innovative reverse logistics‐related dynamic capabilities.

Findings

Resource commitment makes reverse logistics programs more efficient and more effective. However, the resources must be used in such a manner as to develop innovative capabilities/approaches to handling returns. Resource commitment was not found to be significantly related to innovation in reverse logistics at smaller firms. This is likely to be related to the level of resources available. Larger firms can commit greater resources and, thus, enjoy superior performance compared with smaller firms in the survey group.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is somewhat narrow. New research should extend beyond the one industry examined. Future research should also expand to include more members of the supply chain and employ methods that allow examination of network relationships.

Practical implications

Reverse logistics deserves special attention in terms of resource commitment. Resources related to labor, i.e. allocating sufficient personnel to reverse logistics programs, are especially critical. Innovation in reverse logistics programs was found to be related to operational service quality at both small and large firms.

Originality/value

The research provides empirical evidence of the relationships between resource commitment and innovation – and how reverse logistics program performance is influenced. This has important implications with respect to customer relations. It can also be used to provide rationale for securing adequate resource commitment for reverse logistics programs.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Soonhong Min, Anthony S. Roath, Patricia J. Daugherty, Stefan E. Genchev, Haozhe Chen, Aaron D. Arndt and R. Glenn Richey

Collaboration has been referred to as the driving force behind effective supply chain management and may be the ultimate core capability. However, there is a fairly…

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16096

Abstract

Purpose

Collaboration has been referred to as the driving force behind effective supply chain management and may be the ultimate core capability. However, there is a fairly widespread belief that few firms have truly capitalized on its potential. A study was undertaken to assess the current level of supply chain collaboration and identify best practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Supply chain executives provided insights into collaboration. Survey data, personal interviews, and a review of the collaboration literature were used to develop a conceptual model profiling behavior, culture, and relational interactions associated with successful collaboration.

Findings

Positive collaboration‐related outcomes include enhancements to efficiency, effectiveness, and market positions for the respondents' firms.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size represents a limitation, but is balanced by the quality of the respondent base and their expertise/experience. Another limitation involves securing input from only one party to the collaborative relationships. Developing a longitudinal study would help determine how collaboration‐related factors and relationships change over time.

Practical implications

Several respondents mentioned a “blurring of lines” between organizations contrasted to an “us vs them” approach. This was expressed in a number of different ways – treating the arrangements as if they both were part of the same operation, treating them as co‐owned, and employing a new focus on the best common solution. Many of the respondents indicating rewards are not distributed evenly still admitted they get enough “out of” the collaborative arrangements to make it worthwhile.

Originality/value

Real‐world practical experiences are recounted involving many of today's top companies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Stefan E. Genchev, R. Glenn Richey and Colin B. Gabler

Suppliers, manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers alike are still considering reverse logistics (RL) to be the “necessary evil” in their day‐to‐day operations rather…

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3574

Abstract

Purpose

Suppliers, manufacturers, wholesalers, and retailers alike are still considering reverse logistics (RL) to be the “necessary evil” in their day‐to‐day operations rather than an opportunity for future performance. At the same time, a well‐structured RL program can create a substantial value‐added and positively affect the bottom‐line. Based on in‐depth investigation of best‐in‐class RL programs implemented in practice, the purpose of this paper is to offer a grounded flow charting approach for assessing the state of program development and, potentially, identifying areas for improvement across different companies in various industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study utilizes rich qualitative research methodology based on the combination between a thorough review of existing literature and multiple field studies. The findings from existing research, semi‐structured interviews and observation at companies’ sites, and RL‐related documentation at those companies, provide the backbone for the development of the assessment tool.

Findings

Although substantial variations exist in the way companies are setting up their RL programs, some common processes prevail. Formalizing these processes and related activities becomes the differentiating factor in RL program development and implementation. In addition, providing structure to the RL effort helps companies to strategically control the related value‐added.

Originality/value

The paper introduces process formalization as a necessary condition for the development and implementation of RL programs. The grounded flow charting approach, based on a qualitative inquiry in real business situations, aims to bridge the gap between theoretical developments and practical guidance for best‐in‐class RL operations.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

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237

Abstract

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Richard Whitfield

Downloads
223

Abstract

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Downloads
283

Abstract

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Klas Hjort, Daniel Hellström, Stefan Karlsson and Pejvak Oghazi

The purpose of this paper is to explore, describe and categorise practices of managing product returns empirically in internet retailing.

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1050

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore, describe and categorise practices of managing product returns empirically in internet retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study was conducted involving 12 e-commerce firms and 4 logistics service providers. An integrative data collection approach of semi-structured interviews, documentation and observations was used to gain comprehensive managerial and operational descriptions of returns management (RM) processes.

Findings

The findings show inconsistent RM processes, with a plethora of practices implemented and organised differently across firms. RM processes are ambiguous; their design is a result of incremental changes over time, lacking strategy and goals. There is a mismatch between how they are described and understood in the literature and how they are actually used. Practices in gatekeeping, avoidance and reverse logistics are defined and categorised. These serve as a typology of practices for managers to (re)consider, along with 15 propositions on how RM is practised.

Research limitations/implications

The range of RM practices and the processes reflect a lack of scholarly attention and strategic view. Research is needed to develop clear goals on how the RM process can be better aligned with business strategies.

Practical implications

The typology of practices is a benchmark for internet retailers in their design of efficient RM processes.

Originality/value

Systematic and empirical research on RM is scarce compared to forward management. The study bridges this gap as one of the first to describe RM practices in depth, define service as a key activity, and identify a mismatch between theory and practice.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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