Search results

1 – 10 of over 20000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Tino Fenech and Aron O’Cass

Focuses on examining consumer characteristics that influence Internet users to adopt the Web for purchase related behavior (retail usage). The key constructs examined in…

Downloads
6437

Abstract

Focuses on examining consumer characteristics that influence Internet users to adopt the Web for purchase related behavior (retail usage). The key constructs examined in relation to actual adoption are attitudes and perceived usefulness. Also focuses on variables that impact Internet users’ attitudes toward Web retailing, including Internet users’ shopping orientation, perceived Web security, shopping innovativeness, satisfaction with Web sites, importance of inspecting products and price sensitivity. Data was gathered via a self‐administered Web survey. A total of 392 completed surveys were obtained and the results indicate that such characteristics of consumers do influence attitudes towards using Web retailing. The results also indicate that attitude and perceived usefulness do predict adoption of the Web for retail usage. Finally, the results indicate that significant differences exist between adopters of Web retailing and non‐adopters in the price significance, need to handle products and purchase likelihood when they cannot handle products purchased via retailing channels.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Julie E. Francis

Limited attention has been given to the stability of the dimensions of quality across different types of internet retailing. This study aims to identify four distinct…

Downloads
2367

Abstract

Purpose

Limited attention has been given to the stability of the dimensions of quality across different types of internet retailing. This study aims to identify four distinct categories of internet retailing, develops a separate quality measurement scale for each category, then compares the dimensions of quality that emerged for each context.

Design/methodology/approach

Four category‐specific quality measurement scales (or RECIPE scales) were developed, one for each Fulfilment‐Product type of internet retailing. The scales were administered to 1,262 internet shoppers, then the data were used to refine and assess the statistical properties of each instrument. A cross‐category review of the refined quality dimensions was performed.

Findings

All four categories of internet retailing involve the quality dimensions of customer service and security. However, the dimensions of quality associated with selecting, paying for and obtaining products vary according to the type of product that is purchased (goods versus services) and the fulfilment method (offline versus electronic).

Research limitations/implications

There are four category‐specific variations of internet retailing quality. This study provides a framework for distinguishing and measuring each variation.

Practical implications

The “one‐size‐fits‐all” approach to measuring and managing internet retailing quality is not sufficient. Managers should develop quality management strategies that cater to the purchase and fulfilment requirements of customers in their type of internet retailing.

Originality/value

This study delineates internet retailing into four categories and presents a quality measurement scale for each category. This includes scales for three categories where such instruments do not otherwise exist.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Neil F. Doherty and Fiona E. Ellis‐Chadwick

The primary aim of this paper is to critically review the literature that explicitly addresses the adoption and application of internet technologies, by retailers, for the…

Downloads
6582

Abstract

Purpose

The primary aim of this paper is to critically review the literature that explicitly addresses the adoption and application of internet technologies, by retailers, for the promotion and sale of merchandise. In particular, this study seeks to present a holistic and critical review of what is currently known, in order to help establish the gaps that will need to be addressed in future research studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts both quantitative and qualitative approaches to conduct the review, in an attempt to ensure that it is well focused and systematic.

Findings

The key finding of this study is that whilst the internet retailing literature is extremely wide‐ranging, and somewhat fragmented, it can be decomposed into three broad categories: the retailer perspective; the consumer perspective; and the technological perspective. Moreover, it has been noted that whilst the strategic potential of the internet is routinely mentioned in nearly all studies of electronic retailing, there have been very few studies that have explicitly or empirically targeted its strategic management.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of this study is that due to the sheer volume and fragmentation of the literature in the domain, the paper has been based primarily upon a review of ten key journals, rather than every paper that has been published on internet retailing. However, because the target journals have been carefully chosen and systematically reviewed, we believe that the study should have many important implications for researchers, particularly in terms of where future studies of internet retailing might best be positioned.

Originality/value

This research offers a synthesis of the literature, which provides significant new insights into the field of internet retailing, and in particular its strategic importance.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Neil F. Doherty and Fiona Ellis‐Chadwick

The primary aim of this paper is to critically review the literature that explicitly addresses the adoption, application and impact of internet technologies, by retailers…

Downloads
42457

Abstract

Purpose

The primary aim of this paper is to critically review the literature that explicitly addresses the adoption, application and impact of internet technologies, by retailers, for the promotion and sale of merchanidise. In particular, this paper seeks to present a holistic and critical review of the early predictions, with regard to the uptake and impact of internet retailing; critically reappraise these claims in light of current trends in internet retailing; and explore where e‐tailing may be heading in the coming years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts an extensive and critical review of the literature, with regard to the adoption, uptake and impact of internet retailing, as published in the academic literature over the past 20 years.

Findings

In hindsight, it can be seen that many of the original predictions, made at the dawn of the internet era, have not become a reality: retailers are not cannibalising their own custom, virtual merchants are not dominating the market‐place, and the high street has not, as yet, been put out of business. By contrast, other predications have come to pass: electronic intermediaries are playing an increasingly important role, “one‐to‐one” marketing has become a reality, prices are more competitive, and perhaps most importantly the consumer has become more powerful.

Research limitations/implications

Providing a brief review of the past, present and future of online retailing is an extremely ambitious undertaking, especially given the vast amount of literature that has been published in this area. In attempting to provide an overall impression of the broad themes, and most important findings, to emerge from this important body of literature, it is inevitable that many important pieces of work will have been either missed or underplayed. Consequently, there is a need for follow‐up studies that aim to provide deeper and richer reviews of more narrowly defined elements of this vast landscape.

Originality/value

This study presents one of the first and most thorough reappraisals of the initial literature with regard to the likely development, implications, and impact of internet retailing. Moreover, the paper seeks to break new ground by attempting to use the current literature to help predict future directions and trends for online shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Julie E. Francis

The objectives of this paper are to examine the stability of the dimensions of quality across various categories of internet retailing and to identify the quality criteria…

Downloads
2452

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to examine the stability of the dimensions of quality across various categories of internet retailing and to identify the quality criteria that are associated with each category.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews are conducted to examine the quality requirements of internet shoppers relative to four categories of internet retailing. A quality criteria model (or RECIPE) is developed for each category and a comparison of the instruments is performed.

Findings

All four categories of internet retailing involve quality dimensions of “web site”, “transaction”, “delivery”, “customer service”, and “security”. However, the criteria within these dimensions are not stable across the categories. Most of the differences relate to the transaction and fulfilment processes.

Research limitations/implications

In measuring and managing internet retailing quality, “one size does not fit all”. Quantitative research is required to develop and refine quality measurement scales for the three categories of internet retailing for which such instruments do not exist.

Practical implications

Managers should use category‐specific quality management tools to ensure that the purchase and fulfilment requirements of customers are addressed adequately and appropriately.

Originality/value

Because most studies assume that all types of internet retailing are much the same, they have proposed general‐purpose scales for measuring quality. In contrast, the present study identifies and describes four category‐specific variations of internet retailing quality.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Jennifer Rowley

How fast will Internet shopping grow? Many retailers are currently developing a presence in the Internet shopping arena because they wish to be, and to be seen to be, at…

Downloads
4025

Abstract

How fast will Internet shopping grow? Many retailers are currently developing a presence in the Internet shopping arena because they wish to be, and to be seen to be, at the forefront of technological innovation. Before electronic retailing takes a significant market share from traditional retailing there are a number of issues that need to be addressed. This article explores these issues in the context of food shopping and retailing. Current developments in Internet retailing and shopping and specifically in food retailing are reviewed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

John Fernie

Electronic‐retailing is the buzzword of 2000. Every other press release I receive relates to electronic commerce or Internet shopping. Therefore, it seems appropriate to…

Downloads
2828

Abstract

Electronic‐retailing is the buzzword of 2000. Every other press release I receive relates to electronic commerce or Internet shopping. Therefore, it seems appropriate to focus this summer issue of Retail Insights on the subject. The first article by Rowley discusses the phenomenon of shopping bots, the intelligent agents designed to support comparison shopping across a number of Internet sites. She reviews the functions and evaluates the coverage of different shopping bots. In the second article, Wee and Ramachandra assess the level of cyberbuying activities in China, Hong Kong and Singapore by concentrating on the who, why and what of online retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

N.F. Doherty, F. Ellis‐Chadwick and C.A. Hart

A myriad opinions have been propounded to explain how “cyberspace” can be exploited by commercial organisations. For the most part they are speculative, visionary or…

Downloads
7341

Abstract

A myriad opinions have been propounded to explain how “cyberspace” can be exploited by commercial organisations. For the most part they are speculative, visionary or promotional. This work seeks to redress the balance by focusing on the utilisation of the Internet within the UK retail sector and examining its potential as a new retail channel. The paper presents an exploratory study using qualitative and quantitative methods: an on‐line survey of retail Web activities followed by in‐depth interviews. This approach provides a framework of current retail usage of the Internet and explores retailers’ perceptions of the inhibitors and facilitators to its development. It concludes with an emerging model that explains why current levels of retailing on the Internet are low and provides guidance for retailers wishing to increase their level of Internet activity.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Herbert Kotzab and Maria Madlberger

The management of electronic retail channels is not limited to virtual companies only. Also store‐based (stationary) retailers are expected to set up electronic…

Downloads
3251

Abstract

The management of electronic retail channels is not limited to virtual companies only. Also store‐based (stationary) retailers are expected to set up electronic distribution channels. This paper discusses the occurrence of such channels from a European perspective. The authors introduce a Web‐scan framework to analyze the nature of Web offerings and thelogistical elements of e‐tailing. The application of this structure showed that store‐based retailers have already invested in Web‐based activities, mainly for information and/or communication issues. The set‐up of strong electronic channels of distribution is still in an early phase.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 20000