Search results

1 – 10 of over 125000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Jose Manuel Gil Guzman, Asuncion Hernandez-Fernandez and Pedro Canales-Ronda

This paper aims to show the advantages that social marketing training programs for disability professionals can play in improving the approach to the problems faced by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show the advantages that social marketing training programs for disability professionals can play in improving the approach to the problems faced by people with disabilities, offering a necessary mutual understanding between both sectors. So, describing what are the training needs in social marketing expressed by disability professionals and providing an initial shared theoretical framework of both fields that could contribute to implementing social marketing strategies in the field of disability as an inducer of quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a mixed-method approach combining: a quantitative analysis with a web-based self-administered questionnaire completed in six European countries and a qualitative analysis: interviews to experts pre and post questionnaire.

Findings

Quantitative data has identified that: front-line professionals working directly with people with disabilities have high social marketing training needs; these needs are mostly related to the assessment and modification of clients’ behavior and the development of interventions according to the concept of value co-creation. Qualitative data has shown that: both fields share some similar theoretical frameworks. Therefore, it is stated that social marketing has the potential to be better implemented in the disability field.

Research limitations/implications

Considering public policy; stigma and discrimination; regulations; other models and improving the sampling method.

Originality/value

Sharing theoretical framework of both fields, social marketing strategies into the disability field as an inductor for quality of life. No research has analyzed the needs of disability professionals when they have to face a problem and find a solution that social marketing strategies could offer into the disability field.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Johanna Kiili, Maritta Itäpuisto, Johanna Moilanen, Anu-Riina Svenlin and Kaisa Eveliina Malinen

Children are gradually attaining recognition as service users and their involvement in service development has been advanced in recent years. This study draws on empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

Children are gradually attaining recognition as service users and their involvement in service development has been advanced in recent years. This study draws on empirical research in social and health-care services designed for children and families. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how professionals understand children’s involvement as experts by experience. The focus is on professionals’ views and intergenerational relations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research data comprise 25 individual and 10 group interviews with managers and professionals working in social and health-care services in one Finnish province. The data were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis.

Findings

The professionals recognised the value of children’s service user involvement. However, they concentrated more on the challenges than the possibilities it presents. Health-care professionals emphasised parental needs and children’s vulnerability. In turn, the professionals from social services and child welfare non-governmental organisations perceived children as partners, although with reservations, as they discussed ethical issues widely and foregrounded the responsibilities of adults in protecting children. In general, the professionals in both domains saw themselves as having ethical responsibility to support children’s service user involvement while at the same time setting limits to it.

Originality/value

This study confirmed the importance of taking intergenerational relations into account when developing children’s service user involvement. The results indicate that professionals also need to reflect on the ethical challenges with children themselves as, largely owing to the generational position of children as minors, they rarely perceive them as partners in ethical reflection.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Per Nikolaj Bukh, Karina Skovvang Christensen and Anne Kirstine Svanholt

This paper aims to explore how the introduction of new accounting information influences the understandings of cost-consciousness. Furthermore, the paper explores how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the introduction of new accounting information influences the understandings of cost-consciousness. Furthermore, the paper explores how managers use accounting information to shape organizational members’ understanding of changes, and how focusing on cost-consciousness influence professional culture within social services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a case study, drawing on sensemaking as a theoretical lens. Top management, middle management and staff specialists at a medium-sized Danish municipality are interviewed.

Findings

The paper demonstrates how accounting metaphors can be effective in linking cost information and cost-consciousness to operational decisions in daily work practices. Further, the study elucidates how professionalism may be strengthened based on the use of accounting information.

Research limitations/implications

The study is context specific, and the role of accounting in professional work varies on the basis of the specific techniques involved.

Practical implications

The paper shows how managers influence how professionals interpret and use accounting information. It shows how cost-consciousness can be integrated with social work practices to improve service quality.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on how accounting information influences social work. To date, only a few papers have focused on how cost-consciousness can be understood in practice and how it influences professional culture. Further, the study expands the limited accounting metaphor research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Enrico Bracci and Sue Llewellyn

This article aims to focus on one of the most intriguing issues related to the public sector reforms: the accountability systems. In particular the paper aims to deal with…

Downloads
1641

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to focus on one of the most intriguing issues related to the public sector reforms: the accountability systems. In particular the paper aims to deal with the relationships between accounting‐based reforms, forms of accountability, and people‐changing or people‐processing approaches to service provision within Italian social work.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the accountability and people changing/processing literature to interpret and discuss the evidence gathered in an in‐depth longitudinal case study conducted in a social service public organization between 2007 and 2009.

Findings

The article reveals that the case study site had developed two distinct groups of services: “Territoriali” and “Residenziali”. “Territoriali” engage in a traditional mode of social care, they provide professional support to clients with, sometimes, quite intractable problems, and aim to modify clients' characteristics, behaviour and attitudes. In contrast, “Residenziali” deal with, and often outsource, more standardized care packages in the form of residential care, day care and some home‐based services. The accounting reforms were received very differently in these two areas. “Territoriali” was resistant to the changes but, in large part, “Residenziali” embraced them. The article then argues that this reflected the extent to which each service area was willing and able to implement a people‐processing rather than a people‐changing approach. The adoption of the people‐processing method had profound implications for the ways that accountability was both experienced and delivered in the services.

Originality/value

This article deals with the under‐researched area of social care. It integrates two literatures not previously articulated together: accountability and people changing/processing. A three‐year longitudinal study is presented, enabling an in‐depth appreciation of the changes affecting social services and the differential responses to accounting and consequent shifts in accountability in two contrasting service areas.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Qian Hu and Thomas Bryer

Social networking sites (SNSs) have established an important presence in our daily lives and at work. This study explores how public service professionals use SNSs and how…

Abstract

Social networking sites (SNSs) have established an important presence in our daily lives and at work. This study explores how public service professionals use SNSs and how they perceive the potential of SNSs. This study further examines the relationship between the use of SNSs and social trust and civic participation. Last, this study identifies the challenges and opportunities facing public administration practitioners who use SNSs to build collaboration and promote public interests. Based on the nationwide survey results, this study provides a broader understanding of SNS use among public service professionals. Furthermore, it also provides management recommendations on how public service professionals can make full use of SNSs to facilitate their interactions with other public service professionals and citizens, and foster collaboration to pursue public interests.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Christian Fieseler and Giulia Ranzini

The rise of social media has caused a shift in organizational practices, giving rise, in some cases, to genuinely “mediatized” organizations. The purpose of this paper is…

Downloads
2399

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of social media has caused a shift in organizational practices, giving rise, in some cases, to genuinely “mediatized” organizations. The purpose of this paper is to explore how communications managers employ social media to influence their professional impressions.

Design/methodology/approach

Analyzing a sample of 679 European communications professionals, the authors explore with factor and cluster analysis these emerging impression management tactics as well as how managers promote, involve, assist and reproach using social media.

Findings

The authors distinguish four patterns of online impression management: self-promotion, assistance seeking, peer support and authority. Because different professional duties may require different approaches to impression management, the authors furthermore cluster for managerial roles, showing that in the shaping of formal or informal online roles, communication professionals convey different impressions depending on their degree of online confidence and strategic purpose for using social media.

Originality/value

This contribution enriches the existing literature first by shedding light on impression management tactics used for social media within a professional context, concurrently exploring the effect of variables such as the extent and purpose of social media activity, the privacy concerns of managers and their roles within the organization. Second, it proposes a typology of social media impression management tailored to the reality of managers, with the aim of presenting a specific tool for understanding managerial self-communication through social media, classifying and predicting professional behaviors.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Kerrin Clapton

The purpose of this paper is to consider the approach taken by the General Social Care Council to developing professional boundaries guidance for social workers.

Downloads
982

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the approach taken by the General Social Care Council to developing professional boundaries guidance for social workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Areas of tension or difficulty encountered in developing the guidance are highlighted and the reasons for the decisions taken in developing the guidance are discussed.

Findings

The process of developing the guidance served to highlight a number of areas of disagreement regarding how the General Social Care Council should act to address the issue of professional boundaries violations amongst social workers. These areas of disagreement, and how they were resolved within the scope of the guidance, are analysed.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into the types of issues that a regulator confronts when acting to address behaviour amongst its registrants. The approach the General Social Care Council took to professional boundaries issues amongst social workers – producing an aid to reflection rather than a list of “dos” and “don'ts” – and the process of developing the guidance will provide a useful reference point for other organisations confronting similar issues.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Keren Dali

Purpose – In this chapter, I present a systematic discussion of the relationship between social work (SW) and library and information science (LIS) and explore how SW can…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, I present a systematic discussion of the relationship between social work (SW) and library and information science (LIS) and explore how SW can contribute to the education of LIS practitioners so that they become more than information facilitators and grow professionally to be true agents of change.

Design/Methodology/Approach – Using engagement with immigrant communities as a case in point and building on the empirical comparative study of public librarians in the Greater Toronto Area and New York City, I outline the current gaps and deficiencies of LIS curricula that can be rectified through blended education. I also integrate the potential contributions of SW into LIS through the case study of an immigrant member of a library community.

Findings – Building on the case study, I introduce a four-tiered model that can be applied to a wide array of courses in LIS programs and conclude with suggestions for taking steps toward blending SW perspectives into the LIS curriculum.

Originality/Value – I position the potential fusion of SW and LIS as “professional blendedness,” which serves as a catalyst for change, and also examine the concept of the blended professional as a change agent. I introduce the rationale for adopting theoretical, practical, and pedagogical approaches from SW in the field of LIS and focus on four specific contributions that can most benefit LIS:

  • the person-in-environment approach;

  • the strengths perspective and empowerment;

  • the interrelated notions of cultural competence, diversity, and intersectionality; and

  • the theory-mindedness approach (including theory and practice models).

the person-in-environment approach;

the strengths perspective and empowerment;

the interrelated notions of cultural competence, diversity, and intersectionality; and

the theory-mindedness approach (including theory and practice models).

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-884-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Francesca Mochi, Rita Bissola and Barbara Imperatori

This chapter explores different strategies implemented by three companies using professional (LinkedIn) and non-professional (Facebook) social networking websites (SNWs…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores different strategies implemented by three companies using professional (LinkedIn) and non-professional (Facebook) social networking websites (SNWs) as a recruitment tool and investigates the influence of their perceived usability and attractiveness on job seekers’ attraction and their intention to apply.

Methodology/approach

First, a laboratory experiment involving 171 MBA students compares the effectiveness of three different social recruitment strategies. Second, a survey among 110 job seekers focuses on the most effective strategy in terms of attraction as an employer and the influence of perceived usability and attractiveness of professional SNW pages on job seekers’ intention to pursue the job.

Findings

The laboratory experiment confirms the key role of LinkedIn as an e-recruitment practice. The survey shows that the overall company image, the usability of the LinkedIn page and the interaction between the attractiveness of the page and the overall company image positively influence job seekers’ intention to pursue the job.

Social implications

The research offers insights on job seekers’ reactions to 2.0 Internet-based recruitment. Companies should focus on and invest in professional social medias, paying attention to the usability of their SNWs pages.

Originality/value of the chapter

Recruitment is a strategic HRM practice to attract talents; however, research lags behind practice and little is known about job seekers’ perceptions and reactions to Internet recruitment. This chapter sheds light on the use of social media for recruitment and identifies two features that contribute to an effective e-recruitment strategy.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Ashfaq Hussain, Taimoor-Ul-Hassan and Ghulam Shabir

This study aims to examine how information professionals select a social media channel for information discovery and delivery. This analysis was focused to provide usage…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how information professionals select a social media channel for information discovery and delivery. This analysis was focused to provide usage based ranking of social media channels for information discovery and delivery. This study has also measured the preference of social media as compared with other information and communication channels such as radio, TV, newspapers, etc., for information discovery and delivery. This study compared the global social media rank with the study rank to record the variances in the light of uses and gratification theory.

Design/methodology/approach

For this quantitative research study a self-administered survey questionnaire was used to collect data from the participants of the study. Sample of this study was 700 information professionals necessarily user of social media.

Findings

Findings of this reveals that social media is the most preferred channel for information discovery and delivery among information professionals and study validates the assumption of uses and gratification theory with a view that information professionals are independent and active users of social media and global rank of social media is significantly different from the rank developed in this study.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is limited to information professionals only and considers social media (only top 20 sites) as an information and communication channel among information professionals.

Practical implications

This study has determined the preference of social media as an information and communication channel as compared with other information and communication channels and present a ranking based on usage among information professional, which is significantly different from the existing global user based ranking.

Social implications

Social media provides versatility of information in different forms and large numbers of information professionals are the users of social media around globe. This study shall help information professional to select appropriate channels for information discovery and delivery. Usage based ranking provided in this study shall stream line the social media practices at large.

Originality/value

This study has developed a usage based rank of top social media. This study elaborated the preference of social media as an information and communication channel.

1 – 10 of over 125000