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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Nicola Cobelli, Angelo Bonfanti, Serena Cubico and Giuseppe Favretto

This paper aims to empirically examine career guidance services in terms of e-service quality, information quality and perceived value. It specifically examines studentsā€…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically examine career guidance services in terms of e-service quality, information quality and perceived value. It specifically examines studentsā€™ perceptions of quality to explore the effects of e-service quality and information quality on perceived value.

Design/methodology/approach

Students from the University of Verona participated in a quantitative survey, and 119 questionnaires were collected to assess the perceptions of respondents on e-service quality, information quality and perceived value about the career guidance e-service.

Findings

The results indicate that students perceive high value for the career guidance services; the perceived value depends on both service quality of the e-platform and information quality of the report; and efficiency is the most important dimension of e-service quality, while adequacy appears to be the most important dimension of the report.

Practical implications

These findings reveal that service organisations such as universities should invest in career guidance services, given that such services are appreciated by students and contribute to reducing the gap between education and job opportunities. In the design phase, service organisations should pay attention to studentsā€™ career development needs by developing e-platforms that are easy to use, appealing, efficient and with continuous system availability and reports that include relevant, understandable, reliable and adequate information. It is important to provide students with a report after they have completed a questionnaire.

Originality/value

To the authorsā€™ knowledge, this is the first research empirically evaluating the effects of perceived e-service quality and information quality on perceived value with specific reference to career guidance e-services.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Bruce Lloyd and Cathy Bereznicki

Dr Bruce Lloyd, Principal Lecturer in Strategy at South Bank University, in discussion with Cathy Bereznicki, (now former) Chief Executive of Institute of Careers Guidance

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1188

Abstract

Dr Bruce Lloyd, Principal Lecturer in Strategy at South Bank University, in discussion with Cathy Bereznicki, (now former) Chief Executive of Institute of Careers Guidance, about the challenges facing both the careers guidance industry in particular and its clients in general. These new challenges include the growing importance of lifetime learning, the impact of globalisation in many areas, more flexible working, changing expectations, increasing attention to the whole area of values and a greater emphasis on personal development. All these factors are likely to radically alter what we mean by a career in the years and decades ahead. This will have a far reaching effect on the nature and form of the support industies, such as those provided by the Institute of Careers Guidance.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Frans Meijers and Marinka Kuijpers

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation, certainty of career choice and drop out, and also whether the learning environment affects these variables. In the study, four career competencies are identified: career reflection (reflective behavior), work exploration (exploring behavior), career action (pro-active behavior) and networking (interactive behavior). Aspects of the learning environment that are taken into account are practice- and inquiry-based curriculum and career guidance conversations.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based study was carried out among 4,820 students and 371 (school) career counsellors in 11 universities.

Findings

The results show that career competencies are related to learning motivation, career identity, certainty of career choice and drop out threat. The learning environment also contributes to these outcome variables. Students who participate in a practice-based and inquiry-based curriculum, and who have helping conversations about their study with their teachers, feel more motivated for learning, are more certain of their career choice and are less likely to quit their study.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that, due to the cross-sectional design with no control group, no strong evidence for effectiveness can be presented. Moreover, the lack of well validated instruments limits the value of the results. The explained variance of the outcome variables, however, does indicate that there are relationships between career competencies and career learning environment on one hand, and career identity, learning motivation and certainty of choices on the other.

Practical implications

Constructing and attributing meaning when engaging in these dialogues is of central importance; the development of personality traits and qualities only takes place when those learning find the content meaningful (and that is something quite different than content being considered ā€œnecessaryā€). In order to achieve such a learning environment within the dominant educational culture, transformative leadership is essential. Such leadership, however, is rare in Dutch universities of applied sciences until now.

Social implications

Universities are increasingly acknowledging that they have a strong responsibility to guide students not only in their academic growth, but also in their career development. Universities ā€“ and especially universities of applied sciences ā€“ cannot leave this task to the public or private sector for two key reasons. First, universities are funded by the government and are therefore expected to prepare their students adequately for life in our individualized society as well as for the labor market. In the second place because organizations in the private and public sector often lack the knowledge and the motivation to guide young people on their career paths.

Originality/value

A limitation found in the research, as well as in actual career interventions in schools, is that they focus on change in studentsā€™ knowledge, attitudes and decision-making skills, while studentsā€™ behaviors are not examined. Hughes and Karp (2004) maintain that research should focus on exploring the relationships between guidance interventions and positive studentsā€™ behavioral outcomes. Therefore, the paper concentrates ā€“ in search of the influence of school-based career interventions ā€“ not on decision-making skills, attitudes or knowledge but on actual career behavior, i.e. career competencies of students.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Barrie A. Irving

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how critical discourse analysis can help to uncover the dominant discursive formations that underlie policy guidelines within…

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607

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how critical discourse analysis can help to uncover the dominant discursive formations that underlie policy guidelines within education. Focusing on the policy guidelines for career education and guidance in New Zealand, it illustrates how these have been used by the state in an attempt to normalise ideological standpoints, shape ā€œcommonā€senseā€ thinking and delimit the scope of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical discourse analysis was employed as this approach helps to uncover the hidden meanings, political imperatives and uneven workings of power/dominance and oppression that are employed in/through textual representations.

Findings

Neoliberal discourse is infused throughout the policy guidelines for career education and guidance in New Zealand, and demands that career advisers/teachers should produce entrepreneurial and selfā€responsibilised global economic subjects.

Research limitations/implications

Although this paper is situated within a New Zealand context, given the creeping influence of neoliberalism in many Englishā€speaking states, the issues identified have international relevance in relation to the kind of citizen career education is expected to produce.

Originality/value

Much of the literature within the career arena adopts an uncritical, and apolitical, stance, with the truthā€claims made by neoliberal states tending to be positioned as authoritative and inviolable. Drawing from critical theory, this paper contributes a social justice perspective that looks beneath the surface of the seemingly benign and wellā€intentioned discourses that permeate the guidelines for career education and guidance in New Zealand.

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Christine Teelken and Inge Van der Weijden

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the employment situation of postdoctoral researchers (postdocs) in the Netherlands, concerning their career prospects and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the employment situation of postdoctoral researchers (postdocs) in the Netherlands, concerning their career prospects and embeddedness within their organisation, in order to discuss theoretical perspectives on academic careers.

Design/methodology/approach

This multi-method study consists of three parts: a survey, in-depth interviews, and three focus group meetings with postdocs as well as representatives of the human resource staff and the Dutch Research Council (NWO). This paper reports on the findings from the focus group meetings, which concentrated on how postdoctoral researchers consider their employment situation and career prospects.

Findings

The three focus group discussions revealed that postdocs are caught within a dual controversy, the first involves their lack of clarity concerning their career prospects and developments despite their highly valued work, the second regards the fact that they are specialized staff, contributing to the primary process of their employing organisation but faintly connected. Although the postdocsā€™ formal position seems weak, their situation in terms of academic socialising is much stronger and active than appears at first sight, particularly due to their personal agency.

Practical implications

The postdocs require and appreciate guidance and support, particularly when they must leave academia.

Originality/value

The paper provides new and additional insights into the position of postdocs and their career prospects. Their personal agency in pursuing further career steps is more active than expected in previous studies.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Yulia Stukalina, Antra Roskosa and Dmitry Pavlyuk

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main studentsā€™ motivators for their migration decisions, which can be used by education managers working in the area of career

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the main studentsā€™ motivators for their migration decisions, which can be used by education managers working in the area of career management in higher education institutions of Latvia.

Design/methodology/approach

Performed empirical data analysis is based on a survey data, collected from students of various educational programmes in two higher education institutions of Latvia. The data analysis consisted of three steps: initial exploratory data analysis (including testing for sample homogeneity, and sample descriptive statistics), correspondence analysis of studentā€™s answers (including testing for survey reliability, discrimination measures and dimension reduction) and analysis of relationships between survey questions (including contingency tables, testing for directional associations and the logistic regression).

Findings

The results of the study show that studentsā€™ career motivators are significant explanatory factors for their migration decisions. According to the survey results, the main reasons for migration decisions are better career prospects, a higher salary, new professional experience and share of own experience, new professional contacts, motivating and interesting job, better training facilities and the support of their family members and friends who are working or studying abroad.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample in this study included two higher education institutions. Second, the same respondents participated in both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the research. Future study with a more diverse student population and the refined scale items is recommended to verify and generalise the findings.

Practical implications

The paper addresses policy makers at the national level and education managers responsible for career guidance activities. The conducted analysis has allowed the authors to provide some recommendations for education managers working in the area of career guidance and counselling in Latvia. However, as education managers in the Baltic states face similar challenges, the results might be also used by managers working in other Baltic states.

Originality/value

The empirical study performed in the paper has attempted to investigate the influence of studentsā€™ career drivers on their migration decisions in the framework of career management in higher education institutions.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1979

Roy Hollis

Have we not reached a watershed in education that requires a rethink in our attitude to careers work in secondary schools? It is significant that back in 1974 the…

Abstract

Have we not reached a watershed in education that requires a rethink in our attitude to careers work in secondary schools? It is significant that back in 1974 the teachers' professional association concerned enlarged its title to National Association of Careers and Guidance Teachers. In this respect I would argue that Careers and Guidance are not the same, although the former is embraced by the latter. The days of the Careers Teacher are, in my judgement, well past ā€” in too many schools in England and Wales (Scotland has its own system) this title is still given to a teacher largely to meet the headmaster's need for a ā€œcareers setā€upā€ in the school which will satisfy the latter's conscience, the Governing Body, and the majority of articulate parents.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Deborah A. O'Neil, Diana Bilimoria and Argun Saatcioglu

This study, examines women's career types and their effects on women's satisfaction with their career success and their attributions of the sources of this career success…

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7065

Abstract

This study, examines women's career types and their effects on women's satisfaction with their career success and their attributions of the sources of this career success. The study proposes a typology of four career types that are determined by the manifestation of a woman's career pattern and career locus. It finds empirical evidence of three distinct career types for women: achievers, navigators and accommodators. Women having accommodator career types are significantly less satisfied with their career success than women having navigator career types and achiever career types.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Amelia Jane Wise and Lynne J. Millward

The purpose of the study was to discover the key psychological issues involved in voluntary career change in 30ā€somethings, with implications for career theory and guidance.

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2428

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to discover the key psychological issues involved in voluntary career change in 30ā€somethings, with implications for career theory and guidance.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was employed. Data gathering was by means of semiā€structured interviews and interpretation used interpretative phenomenological analysis. A sensemaking perspective within a constructivist framework defined the research.

Findings

Three types of themes were generated from the participant interviews. The first relates to issues of continuity and discontinuity during the change process, the second deals with participant's values directing the change, and the final theme covers the influence of context on the change process. The implications these themes have for contemporary meanings of career are discussed together with suggestions for guidance.

Research limitations/implications

Findings only reflect views at a point in time. A recommendation for future longitudinal research is made. The effect of the researcher is acknowledged in the sensemaking process.

Practical implications

A number of revisions to traditional career theory are identified and several career guidance implications.

Originality/value

This research is unique in addressing specific issues relating to the 30ā€something ageā€group and is topical in dealing with the phenomena of autonomous career change among this group. The use of a phenomenological perspective is scarce in the study of career change and provides a highly personal insight that furthers our understanding of the meaning of career. This is of particular value to career theorists and career counsellors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1981

Joan Hills

The first careers master to be appointed in a public school was almost certainly Stephen Foot, who took on the job at Eastbourne College in 1920. Until then careers advice…

Abstract

The first careers master to be appointed in a public school was almost certainly Stephen Foot, who took on the job at Eastbourne College in 1920. Until then careers advice had been regarded as mainly the province of headmasters. In his autobiography Three Lives, published in 1934, Mr. Foot attributed the rapid spread of such appointments to other schools partly to a series of articles he wrote in Daily Telegraph, following which he was overwhelmed with requests for help not only from schools and parents all over the British Isles but also from countless parents stationed abroad. He wrote:

Details

Education + Training, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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