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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Guoqiang Wang and Zuomin Dong

The objective of this work is to introduce a new method to carry out design optimization of a mechanical system for vibration and shock isolation, in particular, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this work is to introduce a new method to carry out design optimization of a mechanical system for vibration and shock isolation, in particular, the viscous spring isolator mounting system for a forging hammer.

Design/methodology/approach

The system dynamics model for an isolated foundation and solution technique for obtaining system response under impact loads is introduced. A design optimization problem is formulated to minimize the maximum impact force transmissibility under design constraints, using stiffness and damping coefficients of the isolator, mass of the foundation block and support area of soil as design variables. A dedicated simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is applied to solve the optimization problem.

Findings

Viscous spring isolator mounting system, if properly designed, can considerably reduce shock and vibration transmission and the size of the foundation. The optimization leads to a mounting system with superior impact and vibration isolation capability over conventional designs. Sensitivity study and design optimization on a typical 3‐ton forging hammer has demonstrated the advantages of the new design method.

Research limitations/implications

To further improve the accuracy of the design optimization, a more detailed system dynamics model might be introduced.

Practical implications

The work leads to a better design method for viscous spring isolator foundation systems.

Originality/value

This study forms the foundation for further research on design optimization of viscous spring isolator foundation systems, and contributes to the application of SA optimization technique to engineering design.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

S. RAKHEJA and A.K.W. AHMED

A local equivalent linearization methodology is proposed to simulate non‐linear shock absorbers and dual‐phase dampers in the convenient frequency domain. The methodology…

Abstract

A local equivalent linearization methodology is proposed to simulate non‐linear shock absorbers and dual‐phase dampers in the convenient frequency domain. The methodology based on principle of energy similarity, characterizes the non‐linear dual‐phase dampers via an array of local damping constants as function of local excitation frequency and amplitude, response, and type of non‐linearity. The non‐linear behaviour of the dual‐phase dampers can thus be predicted quite accurately in the entire frequency range. The frequency response characteristics of a vehicle model employing non‐linear dual‐phase dampers, evaluated using local linearization algorithm, are compared to those of the non‐linear system, established via numerical integration, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. An error analysis is performed to quantify the maximum error between the damping forces generated by non‐linear and locally linear simulations. The influence of damper parameters on the ride improvement potentials of dual‐phase dampers is further evaluated using the proposed methodology and discussed.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1962

In the preface the author opens his remarks with ‘This book is intended for students, for newcomers to the aircraft industry, for practising designers and for research…

Abstract

In the preface the author opens his remarks with ‘This book is intended for students, for newcomers to the aircraft industry, for practising designers and for research workers in the field of stability and control’. This is a most ambitious proposal and it should be stated, right at the beginning, that, taking the book as a whole, the author has succeeded in his objectives. The book is subdivided into three parts, Part I is devoted to longitudinal motion, Part II is concerned with lateral motion while Part III is entitled ‘Stability and Design’. Before proceeding to the text however there is a most comprehensive list of notation which is commendable and it gives an indication of the thoroughness and care of presentation which is reflected throughout the rest of the book.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Hassan Samami and S. Olutunde Oyadiji

The purpose of this paper is to employ analytical and numerical techniques to generate modal displacement data of damaged beams containing very small crack-like surface…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to employ analytical and numerical techniques to generate modal displacement data of damaged beams containing very small crack-like surface flaws or slots and to use the data in the development of damage detection methodology. The detection method involves the use of double differentiation of the modal data for identification of the flaw location and magnitude.

Design/methodology/approach

The modal displacements of damaged beams are simulated analytically using the Bernoulli-Euler theory and numerically using the finite element method. The principle used in the analytical approach is based on changes in the transverse displacement due to the localized reduction of the flexural rigidity of the beam. Curvature analysis is employed to identify and locate the structural flaws from the modal data. The curvature mode shapes are calculated using a central difference approximation. The effects of random noise on the detectability of the structural flaws are also computed.

Findings

The analytical approach is much more robust in simulating modal displacement data for beams with crack-like surface flaws or slots than the finite element analysis (FEA) approach especially for crack-like surface flaws or slots of very small depths. The structural flaws are detectable in the presence of random noise of up to 5 per cent.

Originality/value

Simulating the effects of small crack-like surface flaws is important because it is essential to develop techniques to detect cracks at an early stage of their development. The FEA approach can only simulate the effects of crack-like surface flaws or slots with depth ratio greater than 10 per cent. On the other hand, the analytical approach using the Bernoulli-Euler theory can simulate the effects of crack-like surface flaws or slots with depth ratio as small as 2 per cent.

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

S. Sarath and P. Sam Paul

A new cutting tool is always well-defined and sharp at the onset of the metal cutting process and gradually losses these properties as the machining process advances…

Abstract

Purpose

A new cutting tool is always well-defined and sharp at the onset of the metal cutting process and gradually losses these properties as the machining process advances. Similarly, at the beginning of the machining process, amplitude of tool vibrations is considerably low and it increases gradually and peaks at the end of the service period of the cutting tool while machining. It is significant to provide a corresponding real-time varying damping to control this chatter, which directly influences accuracy and quality of productivity. This paper aims to review the literature related to the application of smart fluid to control vibration in metal cutting and also focused on the challenges involved in the implementation of active control system during machining process.

Design/methodology/approach

Smart dampers, which are used as semi-active and active dampers in metal cutting, were reviewed and the research studies carried out in the field of the magnetorheological (MR) damper were concentrated. In smart materials, MR fluids possess some disadvantages because of their sedimentation of iron particles, leakage and slow response time. To overcome these drawbacks, new MR materials such as MR foam, MR elastomers, MR gels and MR plastomers have been recommended and suggested. This review intents to throw light into available literature which exclusively deals with controlling chatter in metal cutting with the help of MR damping methods.

Findings

Using an MR damper popularly known for its semi-active damping characteristics is very adaptable and flexible in controlling chatter by providing damping to real-time amplitudes of tool vibration. In the past, many researchers have attempted to implement MR damper in metal cutting to control vibration and were successful. Various methods with the help of MR fluid are illustrated.

Research limitations/implications

A new cutting tool is always well-defined and sharp at the onset of metal cutting process and gradually losses these properties as the machining process advances. Similarly, at the beginning of the machining process, amplitude of tool vibrations is considerably low and it increases gradually and peaks at the end of service period of cutting tool while machining. Application of MR damper along with the working methodology in metal cutting is presented, challenges met are analyzed and a scope for development is reviewed.

Practical implications

This study provides corresponding real-time varying damping to control tool vibration which directly influences accuracy and quality of productivity. Using an MR damper popularly known for its semi-active damping characteristics is very adaptable and flexible in controlling chatter by providing damping to real-time amplitudes of tool vibration.

Social implications

This study attempts to implement smart damper in metal cutting to control vibrations.

Originality/value

It is significant to provide corresponding real-time varying damping to control tool vibration which directly influences accuracy and quality of productivity.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1959

J.F. Harriman

THE elastic members used in flexible engine mountings are nearly always made of rubber, cither natural or synthetic, bonded or unbonded. The reason for this is that…

Abstract

THE elastic members used in flexible engine mountings are nearly always made of rubber, cither natural or synthetic, bonded or unbonded. The reason for this is that although metallic springs could be designed to have the required stiffness properties they have very little natural damping and would allow very large amplitudes to build up at resonant conditions unless some external damping device such as friction disks or oil dashpots were employed. Also it is a difficult matter to anchor a metallic spring in such a way that fretting will not occur at the fixing point. Rubber on the other hand has considerable damping properties and it is this (plus its high specific resilience) which has largely determined its pre‐eminence in this field.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Dixon M Correa, Timothy Klatt, Sergio Cortes, Michael Haberman, Desiderio Kovar and Carolyn Seepersad

The purpose of this paper is to study the behavior of negative stiffness beams when arranged in a honeycomb configuration and to compare the energy absorption capacity of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the behavior of negative stiffness beams when arranged in a honeycomb configuration and to compare the energy absorption capacity of these negative stiffness honeycombs with regular honeycombs of equivalent relative densities.

Design/methodology/approach

A negative stiffness honeycomb is fabricated in nylon 11 using selective laser sintering. Its force-displacement behavior is simulated with finite element analysis and experimentally evaluated under quasi-static displacement loading. Similarly, a hexagonal honeycomb of equivalent relative density is also fabricated and tested. The energy absorbed for both specimens is computed from the resulting force-displacement curves. The beam geometry of the negative stiffness honeycomb is optimized for maximum energy absorption per unit mass of material.

Findings

Negative stiffness honeycombs exhibit relatively large positive stiffness, followed by a region of plateau stress as the cell walls buckle, similar to regular hexagonal honeycombs, but unlike regular honeycombs, they demonstrate full recovery after compression. Representative specimens are found to absorb about 65 per cent of the energy incident on them. Optimizing the negative stiffness beam geometry can result in energy-absorbing capacities comparable to regular honeycombs of similar relative densities.

Research limitations/implications

The honeycombs were subject to quasi-static displacement loading. To study shock isolation under impact loads, force-controlled loading is desirable. However, the energy absorption performance of the negative stiffness honeycombs is expected to improve under force-controlled conditions. Additional experimentation is needed to investigate the rate sensitivity of the force-displacement behavior of the negative stiffness honeycombs, and specimens with various geometries should be investigated.

Originality/value

The findings of this study indicate that recoverable energy absorption is possible using negative stiffness honeycombs without sacrificing the high energy-absorbing capacity of regular honeycombs. The honeycombs can find usefulness in a number of unique applications requiring recoverable shock isolation, such as bumpers, helmets and other personal protection devices. A patent application has been filed for the negative stiffness honeycomb design.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1968

IN the two years since the last Farnborough Air Show was held by the Society of British Aerospace Companies the aircraft industry has achieved an almost complete…

Abstract

IN the two years since the last Farnborough Air Show was held by the Society of British Aerospace Companies the aircraft industry has achieved an almost complete metamorphosis from the body blows in the form of major programme cancellations that almost felled it in 1965 to the very healthy position that it holds today.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

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41

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1958

P.R. Payne

The elimination of the retreating blade stall speed limitation for helicopters by means of an appropriately programmed feathering input is studied for the general case of…

Abstract

The elimination of the retreating blade stall speed limitation for helicopters by means of an appropriately programmed feathering input is studied for the general case of a rigid flapping blade with hinge constraint (thus making the results applicable to conventional, offset‐hinged or cantilevered rotor blades). It is concluded that second harmonic feathering alone will not be particularly effective in delaying the stall limit, but that a suitable programme of several higher harmonic inputs will enable the retreating blade stall limit to be pushed beyond the advancing blade compressibility limit. In the course of the investigation generalized equations were developed for blade flapping to the nth harmonic under the influence of feathering to the nth harmonic. The resultant matrix is symmetrical and checks with the few available limit cases derived by other workers. Because of loose coupling in the matrix generalized equations can be derived giving the effect of any particular harmonic of feathering upon flapping and angle of attack distribution around the disk. The effect of higher harmonic feathering upon rotor stability derivatives is not discussed in this text, but examination of the equations indicates that an improvement in stability could be obtained by the application of second harmonic control. This paper does not discuss the mechanical details of obtaining a higher harmonic feathering input, nor is it suggested that this is necessarily the best means of obtaining higher forward speeds. In certain cases it may be the only means however.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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