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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Rupashree Baral and Shivganesh Bhargava

The purpose of this paper is to examine core self‐evaluations (CSEs), family support, co‐worker support, supervisor support, job characteristics, work‐life balance policies…

1441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine core self‐evaluations (CSEs), family support, co‐worker support, supervisor support, job characteristics, work‐life balance policies (WLBPs) and work‐family culture as the predictors of work‐to‐family enrichment (WFE) and family‐to‐work enrichment (FWE) and explore the moderating effect of CSEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from 485 employees from six organizations in India representing manufacturing, telecommunications and information technology sectors and were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regressions.

Findings

Supervisor support, job characteristics, WLBPs and work‐family culture predicted WFE. CSEs, family support and job characteristics predicted FWE. Little moderating influence of CSEs was found. It moderated the relationship between supervisor support and WFE.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the study constrains inferring conclusions regarding causality.

Practical implications

This study indicates that from an organizational perspective, involvement in family roles should not be viewed as a hindrance, since it can also benefit employees at work. Employee assistance programs may be introduced to help employees develop the necessary skills and adaptability to increase their work‐family enrichment experience.

Originality/value

The construct work‐family enrichment examined in this paper reflects an understanding of work‐family interface from a newer lens in a novel socio‐cultural context and demonstrates the moderating role of CSEs.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Upasana Aggarwal and Shivganesh Bhargava

This paper aims to examine psychological contract contents, as perceived by two parties of the employment relationship, the employee and the employer.

1434

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine psychological contract contents, as perceived by two parties of the employment relationship, the employee and the employer.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted in two phases. Study 1 employs critical incidence technique (CIT) to elicit from individuals their perceptions regarding organization obligations. Study 2 is designed to corroborate the findings of the first study through a survey of 401 employees and 66 employer representatives (functional heads).

Findings

The results of the two studies are consonant with existing literature; nevertheless the role of culture on psychological contract contents is visible. The study reveals variation in employee and employer perspective regarding organizational obligations.

Practical implications

In India, recruiters need to go far beyond the discussions on compensation and focus on building relational aspects of job such as the job content avenues for career growth as well as creating a supportive work culture.

Originality/value

The study contributes to existing literature by examining content of psychological contract, a relatively neglected area of research in a fast growing Asian economy, India.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Rupashree Baral and Shivganesh Bhargava

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of family support, co‐worker support, supervisor support, work‐life balance policies (WLBPs), work‐family culture and job…

3014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of family support, co‐worker support, supervisor support, work‐life balance policies (WLBPs), work‐family culture and job characteristics, as the predictors of work‐to‐family (WFE) and family‐to‐work (FWE) enrichment. In addition, it explored whether such effects were gender specific by examining the moderating effect of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from a sample of 485 managers in India. Analysis was done using multiple regressions.

Findings

Analyses revealed that family support, co‐worker support, supervisor support, WLBPs, work‐family culture and job characteristics predicted WFE while family support and job characteristics predicted FWE. Little moderating influence of gender was found. Gender moderated the relationship between WLBPs and WFE such that the relationship between the two was stronger for women as compared to men. Similarly, gender moderated the link between job characteristics and WFE such that the relationship between the two was stronger for men than women.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the study constrains inferring conclusions regarding causality.

Practical implications

WLBPs have to be offered to women executives and organizations do have to make jobs more enriching in order to increase the level of WFE among women and men, respectively.

Originality/value

The construct work‐family enrichment examined in this paper reflects an understanding of work‐family interface from a newer lens in a novel socio‐cultural context and demonstrates the moderating role of gender.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Rupashree Baral and Shivganesh Bhargava

This paper aims to examine the role of work‐family enrichment in the relationships between organizational interventions for work‐life balance (job characteristics, work‐life…

15748

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of work‐family enrichment in the relationships between organizational interventions for work‐life balance (job characteristics, work‐life benefits and policies, supervisor support and work‐family culture) and job outcomes (job satisfaction, affective commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour). It is hypothesized that organizational interventions for work‐life balance will be positively related to job outcomes and work‐to‐family enrichment will mediate these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 216 managerial employees through a structured questionnaire from four organizations in India representing manufacturing and information technology (IT) sectors. Analysis was done using multiple regressions.

Findings

Job characteristics were positively related to all the measures of job outcomes. Supervisor support and work‐family culture were positively related to job satisfaction and affective commitment. No significant association was found between work‐life benefits and policies (WLBPs) and any of the job outcome measures. Job characteristics and supervisor support were positively related to work‐to‐family enrichment. Work‐to‐family enrichment mediated the relationships between job characteristics and all job outcomes and between supervisor support and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The correlational design prevents conclusions about causality.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for designing jobs, developing supportive work‐family culture and managing employee work‐family interface for maximizing individual and organizational outcomes.

Originality/value

The study reflected on the work‐family domain relationships in a novel socio‐cultural context and demonstrated the mediating role of work‐family enrichment in the relationships between organizational interventions for work‐life balance and job outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Upasna A. Agarwal, Sumita Datta, Stacy Blake‐Beard and Shivganesh Bhargava

This study aims to examine the relationships among leader‐member exchange (LMX), innovative work behaviour (IWB), and intention to quit. The mediating role of work engagement is…

11302

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships among leader‐member exchange (LMX), innovative work behaviour (IWB), and intention to quit. The mediating role of work engagement is tested within the relationship of LMX, IWB, and intention to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents to a survey were 979 Indian managerial employees working in six service sector organisations in India. Structural equation modelling was used to test hypothesised relationships.

Findings

Results suggest quality of exchanges between employees and their immediate supervisors influences engagement. Work engagement correlates positively with innovative work behaviour and negatively with intention to quit. Work engagement mediates the relationship between LMX and innovative work behaviour, and partially mediates intention to quit.

Research limitations/implications

A cross‐sectional design and use of self‐reported questionnaire data is a limitation of this study. Since the study focuses only on service‐sector organisations, the results of this study should be interpreted with caution.

Originality/value

This study makes important theoretical contributions in three ways. In the domain of work engagement, it addresses factors that influence employee engagement and its outcomes. It expands knowledge about organisational resources that foster work engagement. For LMX, this study complements existing research by investigating work engagement as an outcome. Identifying LMX and work engagement as antecedents of innovative work behaviour, it also extends research in that domain. An important contribution is positioning work engagement as a means through which job resources are linked to employee outcomes. The study is also a rare examination of the Indian context.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Upasana Aggarwal and Shivganesh Bhargava

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesise literature on the role of human resource practices (HRP) in shaping employee psychological contract (PC). Based on this…

12076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesise literature on the role of human resource practices (HRP) in shaping employee psychological contract (PC). Based on this review, a conceptual framework for examining the relationship between HRP and PC and their impact on employee attitudes as well as behaviour has been put forward for further examination.

Design/methodological/approach

An extensive review of the literature, examining the role of HRP in influencing PC of employees, between the periods 1972 to 2007 has been conducted. Adopting the multi‐level approach, the paper discusses the role of individual variable (PC) and organisational variable (HRP) on employee attitudes and behaviours.

Findings

The review brings to fore the following: the role of business and employment relationship strategy on HRP; the relationship between HRP and organisation culture as well as employees attitudes and behaviours; the relationship between HRP on and employee's psychological contract; and the moderating effect of those conceptions on employee attitudes and behaviours relationship.

Practical implications

HRP and PC influence employee attitudes and behaviours as well as have a bearing on organisational effectiveness. Suggestively, as a policy implication, firms need to craft and effectively communicate their HR toolkit based on their employment relationship and business strategies.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is that it synthesises the research examining the impact of HRP on PC. Adopting a meso theory, the paper integrates both organisational and individual level variables and proposes a conceptual model.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2022

Sunny Vijay Arora, Arti D. Kalro and Dinesh Sharma

Managers prefer semantic imbeds in brand names, but extant literature has primarily studied fictitious names for their sound-symbolic perceptions. This paper aims to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Managers prefer semantic imbeds in brand names, but extant literature has primarily studied fictitious names for their sound-symbolic perceptions. This paper aims to explore sound-symbolic perceptions of products with blended brand names (BBNs), formed with at least one semantic and one nonsemantic component. Unlike most extant literature, this study not only estimates the effect of vowels and consonants individually on product perceptions but also of their combinations. The boundary condition for this effect is examined by classifying products by their categorization and attributes by their abstractness.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a within-subject experiment, this paper tested perceptions of products with BBNs having high-/low-frequency sounds. A mixed-design experiment followed with sound frequency, product-level categorization and attributes’ abstractness as predictor variables.

Findings

For BBNs, vowel sounds convey brand meaning better than the combinations of vowel and consonant sounds – and these convey brand meaning better than consonant sounds. Differences in consumers’ perceptions of products with BBNs occur when the degree of attributes’ abstractness matches product-level categorization, such as when concrete attributes match subordinate-level categorization.

Practical implications

Brand managers/strategists can communicate product positioning (attribute-based) through BBNs created specifically for product categories and product types.

Originality/value

This research presents a comparative analysis across vowels, consonants and their combinations on consumers’ perceptions of products with BBNs. Manipulation of names’ length and position of the sound-symbolic imbed in the BBN proffered additional contributions. Another novelty is the interaction effect of product categorization levels and attributes’ abstractness on sound-symbolic perception.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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