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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2018

Syeda Hina Batool and Sheila Webber

This study aims to contribute theoretically in the information literacy (IL) literature by presenting process-based framework at the primary education level. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute theoretically in the information literacy (IL) literature by presenting process-based framework at the primary education level. This study also investigated school children’s information-related tasks, their favored information sources and IL skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized qualitative research approach and multiple nested sequential case study design to explore the phenomenon.

Findings

The majority of children from public, private trust and unregistered schools were unable to present, organize, use and understand main ideas of given information. However, the elite economic class school children had good IL skills with few exceptions. Based on research findings, a process-based IL framework has been proposed at the primary education level.

Research limitations/implications

The present study proposed a process-based IL framework which has practical implications for parents, librarians, teachers and policymakers.

Originality/value

The paper is based on doctoral research which is of significance to information professionals and educators.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 68 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2018

Andrew D. Madden, Sheila Webber, Nigel Ford and Mary Crowder

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between preferred choice of school subject and student information behaviour (IB).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between preferred choice of school subject and student information behaviour (IB).

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods were employed. In all, 152 students, teachers and librarians participated in interviews or focus groups. In total, 1,375 students, key stage 3 (11-14 years) to postgraduate, responded to a questionnaire. The research population was drawn from eight schools, two further education colleges and three universities. Insights from the literature review and the qualitative research phase led to a hypothesis which was investigated using the questionnaire: that students studying hard subjects are less likely to engage in deep IB than students studying soft subjects.

Findings

Results support the hypothesis that preferences for subjects at school affect choice of university degree. The hypothesis that a preference for hard or soft subjects affects IB is supported by results of an analysis in which like or dislike of maths/ICT is correlated with responses to the survey. Interviewees’ comments led to the proposal that academic subjects can be classified according to whether a subject helps students to acquire a “tool of the Mind” or to apply such a tool. A model suggesting how IB may differ depending on whether intellectual tools are being acquired or applied is proposed.

Practical implications

The “inner logic” of certain subjects and their pedagogies appears closely linked to IB. This should be considered when developing teaching programmes.

Originality/value

The findings offer a new perspective on subject classification and its association with IB, and a new model of the association between IB and tool acquisition or application is proposed, incorporating the perspectives of both teacher and student.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Kondwani Wella, Sheila Webber and Philippa Levy

The purpose of this paper is to report on research that uncovered myths about HIV and AIDS held by serodiscordant couples in Malawi, and the sources of these myths. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on research that uncovered myths about HIV and AIDS held by serodiscordant couples in Malawi, and the sources of these myths. The paper reflects on how the myths affect serodiscordant couples’ engagement with HIV and AIDS information.

Design/methodology/approach

Van Manen’s (1997) approach to analysis of phenomenological data was used to analyse data from in-depth interviews conducted in Malawi with 21 serodiscordant couples and three individuals who had separated from their partners because of serodiscordance.

Findings

Serodiscordant couples in Malawi believe and hold on to some inaccurate HIV and AIDS information that can be seen as “myths”. Some of these myths are perpetuated by official HIV and AIDS information when it is translated into the local languages. Other myths derive from social norms of the societies where the couples live.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper have practical implications for how HIV and AIDS information providers should engage with target audiences to understand the origins of the myths they hold. The findings also imply that some myths have technical, religious, moral and cultural bases which need to be addressed before challenging the myth itself.

Originality/value

Using real-life descriptions of experiences of HIV and AIDS information provided by serodiscordant couples, the authors reveal how myths can affect engagement with the information. The authors make recommendations on how to address myths in ways that contribute to a positive experience of HIV and AIDS information by serodiscordant couples.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2014

Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston

In this chapter, we propose an educational framework to position Information Literacy (IL) and Higher Education (HE) in relation to Lifelong Learning (LLL): comprehensive…

Abstract

In this chapter, we propose an educational framework to position Information Literacy (IL) and Higher Education (HE) in relation to Lifelong Learning (LLL): comprehensive enough to make sense of, and give educational direction to, future development of people in information literate populations. We identify crucial changes in the HE environment, particularly in the United Kingdom; analyse the concept of IL as a discipline, and situate the IL person in the changing information culture and society. In doing this we draw on our own work and that of Schuller and Watson (2009). We propose a curriculum for an information literate lifecourse, sensitive to the context of the individual within a changing information culture. The curriculum is framed, on the one hand, by the nature of the information economy, technology, organisational culture, local/national culture and society, and personal goals. It is also framed by the life stage of the individual, using the four key stages and transitional points proposed by Schuller and Watson (2009). Academics and librarians have a key role in designing and facilitating these IL capabilities for the 21st century citizen.

Details

Developing People’s Information Capabilities: Fostering Information Literacy in Educational, Workplace and Community Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-766-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Wilfred Ashworth and Ian Pettman

FEE OR FREE? The debate continues! The issue of Inform for July/August 1993, No. 156, published by the Institute of Information Scientists is largely devoted to the…

Abstract

FEE OR FREE? The debate continues! The issue of Inform for July/August 1993, No. 156, published by the Institute of Information Scientists is largely devoted to the question of whether it is right to charge for information services. It contains short articles on charging at AEA Technology, Winfrith; the Wiltshire Library and Museum Service; and a series of hints on charging; finishing with a bibliography derived from recent library literature. There is also a short but pithy editorial by Sheila Webber, the Inform editor. Bring yourself up‐to‐date on the question and maybe also send Inform your views, as requested.

Details

New Library World, vol. 94 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Maryam Nazari and Sheila Webber

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from an investigation into the conceptions and characteristics of geo/spatial information (GI) to demonstrate how exploring…

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1169

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from an investigation into the conceptions and characteristics of geo/spatial information (GI) to demonstrate how exploring academics and students' conceptions of GI facilitated illumination of information literacy (IL) in the Geographic Information Science/Systems (GIS) discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting an embedded exploratory case study, the data were gathered from semi‐structured interviews, an open‐ended questionnaire and students' reflection in an online distance learning (ODL) GIS programme. The data were analysed in light of the Grounded Theory approach. Drawing on the conceptions of GI which emerged from the study, this paper highlights several characteristics of GI and discusses their implications for IL. In particular, it compares the emergent IL competencies in the GIS discipline with those in the SCONUL model.

Findings

GI was identified as geo/spatial, temporal, geo/spatially contextualised, and geo/spatially technology‐mediated. According to these conceptions, GI is a constructive concept; it has multiple components which need various operations and user inputs to become geo/spatially meaningful and usable. These characteristics uncovered new aspects of IL in the GIS discipline which influence the depth and breadth of the SCONUL model.

Research limitations/implications

Unlike exploratory studies of IL which focus on the IL and IL competencies to explore this phenomenon, the methodological approach taken in this study provides IL researchers with a new approach whose primary focus is on the concept of information as a key contextual element of IL. This helps one to gain a deeper insight into IL in disciplinary areas.

Practical implications

The emergent aspects to the SCONUL model can be taken into consideration when designing and delivering IL programmes in the GIS discipline. Likewise, the emergent picture of IL in this study can be used by GIS educators to develop information‐literate GIS learners.

Originality/value

This study is original in terms of both its methodological approach and its outcomes. These can be of value to IL researchers, educators and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 67 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Bill Johnston and Sheila Webber

This paper aims to identify potential roles for Library and Information Science (LIS) faculty in an information literate University (ILU). The authors note the pressures…

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1302

Abstract

This paper aims to identify potential roles for Library and Information Science (LIS) faculty in an information literate University (ILU). The authors note the pressures on universities for change, and the debates and issues arising from these pressures. They define Information Literacy (IL) and present their concept of the ILU. Two case studies in curriculum development are outlined. The first describes development of compulsory Integrative Studies classes in the Strathclyde University’s Business School. These are taught by a cross‐disciplinary team, and they represent a rethinking of the course curriculum. The second case study, of the IL class at Strathclyde University, provides an example of experimenting with a holistic IL curriculum. Building on this, the authors propose possible roles for LIS faculty within the ILU. The paper concludes by suggesting that LIS faculty have some way to progress in fulfilling all their potential roles.

Details

New Library World, vol. 105 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Stuart Boon, Bill Johnston and Sheila Webber

The purpose of this research is to identify UK English academics' conceptions of information literacy and compare those conceptions with current information literacy…

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4182

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify UK English academics' conceptions of information literacy and compare those conceptions with current information literacy standards and frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

Three year AHRB‐funded study involving 80 academics interviewed throughout the UK and using the phenomenographic research method to discover variation in experience leading towards identification of qualitatively different conceptions of information literacy. Conceptions are then reviewed in light of previous research and current librarian‐generated frameworks and standards.

Findings

The findings identify UK English academics' conceptions of information literacy and show them to be both similar to and significantly different from conceptions described in previous research and librarian‐generated frameworks and standards.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on creating a conceptual snapshot‐in‐time for the 20 English academics taking part. The research implies that disciplinary differences in conception of information literacy are significant and suggests further research to assess disciplinary conceptual differences.

Practical implications

Librarians working with English faculty on information literacy need to be aware of differences in conception between themselves and academics to work effectively. The paper also highlights the significance of information literacy in English faculty's teaching and research practices and this relevance suggests that information literacy should be integrated into course and curriculum design.

Originality/value

The paper fills a major gap in literature on information literacy by focussing on conceptions of lecturers, thereby counterbalancing the abundance of work produced by librarians. The paper illustrates the complexity of English academics' conceptions of information literacy and informs academics' use and understanding of information literacy.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Sheila Simsarian Webber

Cross‐functional teams (CFTs) have increased in use within a variety of organizations. While these teams claim to enhance organizational effectiveness, research has seen…

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14923

Abstract

Cross‐functional teams (CFTs) have increased in use within a variety of organizations. While these teams claim to enhance organizational effectiveness, research has seen mixed results. This paper examines the challenges faced by CFTs and why these challenges facilitate the need for the development of a team climate for trust. Trust is discussed as a team‐level construct, an aspect of the “micro‐climate” that occurs within a team. Leadership actions particularly important to cross‐functional teams and the development of trust are offered as influential in creating a team climate for trust in cross‐functional teams.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Sabina Gumulak and Sheila Webber

This paper aims to identify what motivates young people to play video games, and the extent to which video games are perceived as facilitating learning and information literacy.

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7887

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify what motivates young people to play video games, and the extent to which video games are perceived as facilitating learning and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach, interviewing a convenience sample of 28 young people who enjoy playing video games. They were aged between 12 and 19, and all resident in Northern England. The interview transcripts were analysed thematically.

Findings

Entertainment and challenge were key reasons for playing video games. Of the respondents 89 per cent said they had learned something from gaming, including skills with real‐world application. Respondents used a variety of texts to solve gaming problems and to choose new games. Analysis of respondents' reported information behaviour showed that they were carrying out activities (e.g. searching, evaluating) that corresponded to models of information literacy, and these activities are mapped to the SCONUL Seven Pillars model. The interviewees showed determination in working out game problems and puzzles, rather than opting straight for an easy solution.

Practical implications

Librarians and other educators should design information literacy games, which challenge learners, using a problem‐solving approach. They also need to take account of learners' varying preferences for game genres.

Originality/value

There have been relatively few empirical studies into information literacy in videogaming (the focus is more usually on digital literacy, or literacy in reading and interpreting text). The paper identifies gamer preferences and behaviours that should influence design of information literacy games, and extend the information literacy model to include an attitudinal focus, fostering persistence and determination to solve information problems.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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