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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Patrick Mapulanga, Dorothy Doreen Eneya and Diston Store Chiweza

The purpose of this paper was to assess the similarities and differences between the Political Parties and the Access to Information Acts in Malawi. While political…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess the similarities and differences between the Political Parties and the Access to Information Acts in Malawi. While political parties are largely funded by donations that are frequently kept as a secret, the Access to Information Act does not include political party funding among the categories of non-disclosed information.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the qualitative content analysis of the legislation in Malawi. Content analysis of the two pieces of legislation was adopted. This paper is a review of the literature and an examination of Malawi's Political Parties and Access to Information Acts. The document study was supplemented by a review of related literature on the two legislations.

Findings

The Political Parties Act prohibits the government, ministries and departments from directly or indirectly funding political parties. The Access to Information Act to ensure information generated by Malawi government ministries, departments and agencies is readily made available by the citizens when needed or requested. The Access to Information Act does not exempt political parties from disclosing their funding sources. The two acts work in tandem to promote accountability and transparency in political party funding and sources.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to Malawi's Political Parties and Access to Information Acts. Only the South African related acts have informed the paper. However, several acts within developing countries would have greatly aided the paper.

Practical implications

The implementation of the two pieces of legislation has implications for the balance between disclosure and non-disclosure of political party funding. Oversight functions and credible human resource capacity are needed in both political parties and government enforcement institutions.

Social implications

Oversight functions by the Administrator-General through the Registrar of Political Parties and the Malawi Human Rights Commission are key to the implementation of Malawi's Political Parties and Access to Information Acts, respectively. Proper enforcement of the oversight functions is expected to result in an open, transparent and accountable Malawian society.

Originality/value

Various players are needed in the accountability chain to protect disclosure and non-disclosure of information. Very little information is known on the powers, functions and duties of office bearers capable of enforcing legislation to keep political parties' funding clean. Little is known on how the citizens can access information regarding political parties funding.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2018

Levi Zeleza Manda and Noel Drake Kufaine

Since the 1970s, Malawi has been a host to asylum seekers fleeing from liberation and civil wars in Mozambique, Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, and the…

Abstract

Since the 1970s, Malawi has been a host to asylum seekers fleeing from liberation and civil wars in Mozambique, Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, and the Zaire/Democratic Republic of the Congo (Makhema, 2009). As a signatory to international legal instruments governing refugees and asylum seekers, Malawi, whose constitution advocates for education rights for all, is obligated to host the refugees and provide for their needs such as pre-primary, primary, secondary and higher education, health, and security.

In this chapter, the authors discuss the history of refugee flows into Malawi and refugee education policy within the national education policies in Malawi. In particular, the authors argue that refugees are part of Malawi’s social and demographic reality and their education needs and rights should be factored into the country’s higher education policy and annual national budgets. The authors further make proposals for extending equitable higher education access to accommodate refugee applicants.

The authors conclude by recommending that, in order for Malawi to live by its commitments to serve all humanity without segregation, it should reserve a quota for refugees in public universities, or at least welcoming refugee applicants on local fees terms.

Details

Strategies, Policies, and Directions for Refugee Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-798-0

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Luis Gadama, Chrissie Thakwalakwa, Chimwemwe Mula, Victor Mhango, Chikosa Banda, Stephanie Kewley, Alyson Hillis and Marie-Claire Van Hout

Sub-Saharan African prisons have seen a substantial increase in women prisoners, including those incarcerated with children. There is very little strategic literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Sub-Saharan African prisons have seen a substantial increase in women prisoners, including those incarcerated with children. There is very little strategic literature available on the health situation and needs of women prisoners and their circumstantial children in Malawi. The study aims to explore this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory study using in-depth key informant interviews with senior correctional stakeholders (commissioner of prison farms, senior correctional management staff, senior health officials and senior officers in charge) (n =5) and focus group discussions (FGD) with women in prison of age between 18 and 45 years (n =23) and two FGD with correctional staff (n =21) was conducted in two prisons in Malawi, Chichiri and Zomba. Narratives were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Three key themes emerged and are as follows: “hygiene and sanitary situation across multiple prison levels and subsequent health implications for women”; “nutritional provision and diets of women and children in prison”; and “women’s access to prison-based and external health services”. Divergence or agreement across perspectives around sanitation and disease prevention, adequacy of nutrition for pregnant or breast-feeding women, health status and access to prison-based health care are presented.

Practical implications

Garnering a contemporary understanding of women’s situation and their health-care needs in Malawian prisons can inform policy and correctional health practice change, the adaptation of technical guidance and improve standards for women and their children incarcerated in Malawi.

Originality/value

There is a strong need for continued research to garner insight into the experiences of women prisoners and their children, with a particular emphasis on health situation.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Patrick Mapulanga

– The purpose of this paper is to look at staff development and its challenges in the University of Malawi Libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at staff development and its challenges in the University of Malawi Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study design was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data. University Budget Estimates from 2004/2005 to 2010/2011 financial years were analysed. Data from the University of Malawi Strategic Plan 2005-2009 were examined. Interviews were conducted with college librarians in the University of Malawi Libraries. Documentary evidence was also used.

Findings

Study findings indicate that staff development in the University of Malawi Libraries has emphasised on professional qualification in Library and Information Studies. However, due to financial constraints, the majority of the library staff lacks LIS professional qualifications. This study recommends that libraries should consider budgeting for continuing professional development (CPD).

Practical implications

Staff development requires continuous funding and time. This study recommends the CPD approach to staff development in academic libraries. The study also recommends the introduction of an education levy to benefit skills and training needs for higher education institutions.

Originality/value

There is dearth of literature on staff development in academic libraries in Malawi. This paper seeks to recommend CPD.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 20 October 2017

Caren Scheepers, Lyal White and Adrian Kitimbo

Leadership; Political Economy; Strategy; Entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Subject area

Leadership; Political Economy; Strategy; Entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

Masters in Business Administration (MBA); MPhil in Strategic Leadership.

Case overview

On 5 February 2016, South African entrepreneur Jannie Van Eeden faced a dilemma about whether to expand his current businesses or not. He had to choose between focusing exclusively on hospitality and tourism or dividing his time and resources between the tourism business and expanding his existing logistics business. Expansions to his logistics business would entail investing in a warehouse and supplying fresh produce to the lodges in the wider area of Lake Malawi where he was based. Van Eeden realised that he needed to take into account the political economy of Malawi in unpacking the contextual variables related to his decision. Various stakeholders’ roles are illustrated in the case, for example the government’s role in enabling entrepreneurial businesses as well as the investments made by foreign organisations and international donors.

Expected learning outcomes

Development of leaders who can take contextually intelligent decisions. Insights into conducting Political Economy analysis to enable doing business in Africa.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 7: Management Science.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Steven William Kayuni

In September, 2013 following a police tip, a government accounts clerk was found with huge sums of cash amounting to US$300,000 in his car, and a week later, Malawi’s…

Abstract

Purpose

In September, 2013 following a police tip, a government accounts clerk was found with huge sums of cash amounting to US$300,000 in his car, and a week later, Malawi’s Budget Director (Treasury Official) was fatally shot outside his home. These two incidents unravelled what would later be famously known as the “Cashgate Scandal” that leading to revelations of fraud amounting to US$32 million, an amount representing almost 1 per cent of Malawi’s annual GDP in merely six months. As a result, donors withdrew their annual 40 per cent budgetary support. A lot of people (almost 70) in both public and private sector found with both cash in local or foreign currency were arrested. An independent audit report by Baker Tilly, a British accountancy firm, revealed that the fraud and theft was with such sophistication that cheques were issued to private companies for services that had not been rendered to government. Those cheques were cashed, and money was distributed among several people. Those arrested were charged with offences ranging from corruption, abuse of office, theft, theft by public servant, tax evasion and money laundering. This paper aims to analyse the cashgate scandal. It explores the first conviction of these cashgate case series which also happens to be the first ever conviction on money laundering offence in Malawi. It further explores the law likely to apply to the cashgate scandal case series, the opportunities that have been lost and likely stifling implications on the future of the fight against corruption and money laundering offences in Malawi. All law enforcement actors such as the prosecution, defence and the courts have that duty to clarify and implement the common interests of Malawians, namely, the prescriptive purposes of the law in accordance with the expectations of an approximate process that guarantees attainment of human good, i.e. justice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the desk research of various journal articles and reports on money laundering in general and Malawi. Further, an analysis of the first money laundering conviction is presented.

Findings

Malawi is still struggling with enforcement of money laundering offences.

Research limitations/implications

There was no quantitative research involved. Further, being the first case for litigation and conviction, not much has come up on Malawi’s money laundering practice. Actually, this is likely to be the first article on money laundering and analysis of the cashgate heist.

Social implications

The paper serves as a learning process for future prosecutions.

Originality/value

The paper offers a new and novel approach to the fight against money laundering offences and organized criminality in Malawi. Before the Treza Senzani Judgment, Money Laundering Law in Malawi had never been tested before the Courts. Through an exegesis of the Malawi law as regards these offences, the paper adds value to the research and fight against money laundering. It further offers insights into legal interpretation and policy formulation that would enable law enforcement agencies in Malawi to succeed in the fight against such criminality.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Patrick Mapulanga

The purpose of this paper is to highlight how libraries in Malawi are accessing e‐resources.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight how libraries in Malawi are accessing e‐resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a case study approach. Quantitative data were collected and analysed. Data was collected through MALICO and INASP documentary. Usage statistics provided by counter compliant publishers and collated by INASP from 2008 to 2012 was the other source of information. Annual member contributions and e‐resource subscription sheets from MALICO were used for data collection. Qualitative data have been presented and analysed in the form of tables and graphs.

Findings

Libraries in Malawi have access to peer reviewed and impact factored journals courtesy of EIFL, INASP, HINARI, OARE, AGORA and other international organisations. Libraries in Malawi contribute towards the e‐resources to the consortia, MALICO, at heavily discounted rates done through negotiations by eIFL and INASP with the publishers. Currently, the libraries are failing to contribute their portion towards e‐resources due to inadequate budgets. Libraries in Malawi have resorted to digitising local content and establishing locally available institutional repositories.

Practical implications

Libraries in Malawi are making enormous strides in building digital libraries and institutional repositories based on local content.

Originality/value

There is little researched information on the funding levels and use of e‐resources in libraries in Malawi. This paper seeks to bridge the gap by providing some information on the state of e‐resources for libraries in Malawi.

Details

Library Review, vol. 62 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Patrick Mapulanga

The paper seeks to explore the impact of a fibre optic network and increased bandwidth on access to electronic resources for libraries in Malawi.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explore the impact of a fibre optic network and increased bandwidth on access to electronic resources for libraries in Malawi.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted a case study methodology. Online interviews were conducted with ICT Directors in colleges of the University of Malawi and Mzuzu University. The ICT Directors provided information on bandwidth levels and estimated costs for libraries using VSAT and fibre optics for internet connectivity. User statistics from INASP for the years 2006, 2011 and 2012 were the main sources of information.

Findings

Libraries in Malawi have been affected by the fibre optic network. The fibre optic network has increased bandwidth from a maximum of 1,024 in Kbps around 2006 to between 4 and 8 Mbps per month. Bandwidth costs have been reduced from an average of $US3,000/Mbps in 2006 to around US$1,700/Mbps per month in 2012. The number of articles downloaded has increased from 6,075 in 2006 to 50,860 in 2011, representing a 737 per cent increase. Half‐year statistics for 2012 reveal that the number of articles downloaded increased from 50,860 in 2011 to 81,633, representing a 60.5 per cent increase.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications on the impact of a fibre optic network and improved bandwidth on access to e‐resources in libraries.

Originality/value

There is an information gap on the impact of fibre optic internet connectivity and improved bandwidth on access to e‐resources in libraries in Africa, and in Malawi to be specific. This research paper seeks to fill and bridge the gap.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Mary W. Mhango and Linda S. Niehm

This preliminary study describes the Malawi second‐hand clothing market and recommends strategies for improved distribution by entrepreneurs. We explore the potential for…

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4769

Abstract

Purpose

This preliminary study describes the Malawi second‐hand clothing market and recommends strategies for improved distribution by entrepreneurs. We explore the potential for formal retailing of second‐hand clothing in Malawi and present avenues for further research on the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical content analysis was conducted using data from secondary sources. Data reduction, data display, conclusion drawing, and verification allowed for organization and compression of information, and assisted in identification of research gaps.

Findings

Preliminary findings suggest organizational structure and effective distribution channel relationships may lead small‐scale entrepreneurial ventures to grow in the Malawi formal market. It is apparent that second‐hand clothing retail entrepreneurs have significant location and resource advantages to leverage in the Malawi domestic market.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis was based on limited literature given the undocumented nature of Malawi retailing and the second‐hand apparel market. Potential research phases that could build from this study includes ethnographic study of current second‐hand clothing distribution and consumption practices in the Malawi context, stakeholders' perspectives on formalizing the second‐hand clothing trade, and a feasibility study on entrepreneurial training and start‐up program for small formal retailers of second‐hand apparel.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the second‐hand clothing trade as an under researched area with much fruitful potential for future study. Also the proposed framework for understanding retail development and distribution of second‐hand clothing from an embedded market perspective may be transferable to other developing nations who rely heavily on second‐hand clothing to meet consumer apparel needs.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Aubrey Harvey Chaputula and Felix Patrick Majawa

– The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of social networking sites (SNSs) by mass media organisations in Malawi.

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2114

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of social networking sites (SNSs) by mass media organisations in Malawi.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was a survey that was carried out amongst mass media organisations in Malawi. It mainly employed quantitative methods. Data were collected through a combination of mailed and self-administered questionnaires.

Findings

The research established that SNSs were popularly used by mass media organisations in Malawi such that 20 (87 per cent) of the mass media organisations had SNS pages. Facebook was the most commonly used SNS although Twitter was also used. Mass media organisations benefited from using SNSs through increased listenership/readership, and soliciting of feedback which helped improve service offering. However, few mass media organisations registered increased business activity through the use of SNSs. Challenges associated with using SNSs were limited ICT penetration in Malawi, distraction of employees' attention at work, and there was also a concern that not many people interact on SNSs.

Research limitations/implications

Despite registering an overall high response rate of 74 per cent, the response rate amongst other media categories especially the community radio broadcasters was generally poor. In fact only one out of the four organisations responded to the questionnaires. This entails that the study may have not adequately presented a true picture of organisations within this category. So although the study findings reflect the prevailing situation amongst mass media organisations in Malawi in relation to their use of SNSs, they may not holistically apply to organisations within the community radio category.

Practical implications

A number of studies have shown that radio listenership and television viewership are dwindling. At the same time, audiences and attention are shifting to online channels. This research, therefore, recommends that mass media organisations should continue using SNSs so as to capture this audience, and also to remain relevant in the modern society.

Originality/value

Being a relatively new area of research, the study has provided unique knowledge about the use, benefits and challenges of the application of SNSs among mass media organisations in Malawi. Consequently, this has brought to light the use of SNSs as an opportunity which other private and public institutions could take advantage of, as a means of enhancing their operations.

Details

Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives, vol. 65 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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