Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Vivien K.G. Lim and Geok Leng Loo

This study examined human resource managers’ knowledge of HIV transmission, their attitudes towards employing persons living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PWHIVs…

2147

Abstract

This study examined human resource managers’ knowledge of HIV transmission, their attitudes towards employing persons living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PWHIVs) and disclosure of HIV‐related information. Results indicate that respondents were generally knowledgeable about the transmission of HIV and viewed the employment of PWHIVs as having adverse organisational consequences. With respect to disclosure of HIV‐related information, findings suggest that generally respondents felt that employers should have access to health records of persons infected with HIV while they were more ambivalent about the issue of revealing such information to co‐workers of PWHIVs. Implications of findings for organisations are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Inang Winarso, Ingrid Irawati, Bambang Eka, Laura Nevendorff, Patri Handoyo, Hendra Salim and Faboi Mesquita

There were 89,708 prisoners in Indonesia in April 2006. The majority were charged for narcotics related crimes. Prisons are working at over‐capacity and with miniscule…

194

Abstract

There were 89,708 prisoners in Indonesia in April 2006. The majority were charged for narcotics related crimes. Prisons are working at over‐capacity and with miniscule healthcare budgets. There has been an increase of deaths due to AIDS, particularly among people who inject drugs. Official data shows that HIV prevalence averages 22% in prisons. In late 2002, the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) decided to promote HIV/AIDS prevention and care activities for prisoners to prevent the spread of HIV within prisons, and from there to the community as a whole. In 2005, MOJ launched the Indonesian National Strategy for HIV/AIDS Prevention, Care and Support for Prisoners. The Indonesian HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care Project has been actively involved in the design of these programs and supported their implementation in several prisons, together with other organizations. The Indonesian National Strategy is the first of its kind in Asia, and one of only a few dedicated national strategies for HIV/AIDS prevention and care for prisoners. It has enabled education, as well as the provision of condoms, bleach, methadone and antiretroviral therapy for prisoners. This paper describes the National Strategy for HIV/AIDS Prevention, Care and Support for Prisoners, which will help control the HIVepidemic among people who inject drugs and ultimately be beneficial for the community as a whole.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Smriti Agarwal and Pedro de Araujo

HIV prevention campaigns have focused on condom distribution and the dissemination of HIV‐related knowledge, with the goal to reduce risky sexual behavior. However, very…

185

Abstract

Purpose

HIV prevention campaigns have focused on condom distribution and the dissemination of HIV‐related knowledge, with the goal to reduce risky sexual behavior. However, very little empirical work has been done to reveal any possible association between HIV‐related knowledge and risky sexual behavior. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to estimate such associations, using demographic health survey data for India.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors estimate multiple binary response models and calculate average partial effects of every treatment (HIV‐related knowledge) on the outcome variable (risky sexual behavior) controlling for socioeconomic characteristics, location of residence, and state specific effects.

Findings

Using data from the third wave of the national demographic survey, it is found that better HIV‐related knowledge does not always promote safer sexual practices. While, better HIV knowledge increases the likelihood of condom use, it also increases the likelihood of pre‐marital sex, and reduces the likelihood of abstinence. These effects are much stronger for males when compared to females. These results also suggest, albeit indirectly, that informational and condom distribution campaigns are not necessarily promoting safer sexual practices in India.

Research limitations/implications

One possible limitation of this study is the possibility of endogeneity bias due to omitted variables or reverse causality. The authors follow the literature in the use of controls and interpreted results with caution.

Originality/value

The paper is believed to be the first to derive empirical results relating HIV knowledge and risky sexual behaviour, using a population‐based survey for India.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Rick Lines and Heino Stöver

HIV/AIDS is a serious health threat for prison populations in many countries, and presents significant challenges for prison and public health authorities. This situation…

Abstract

HIV/AIDS is a serious health threat for prison populations in many countries, and presents significant challenges for prison and public health authorities. This situation is often exacerbated by high rates of hepatitis and/or tuberculosis. The generally accepted principle that prisons and prisoners remain part of the broader community means that the health threat of HIV within prisons, and the health threat outside of prisons, are inextricably linked and demand coordinated action. Yet many countries have not implemented comprehensive HIV prevention programmes in prisons, or achieved a standard of prison healthcare equivalent to the standard outside of prison. In December 2004, the authors were retained by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to prepare an international Framework to address HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment in prisons. The Framework is a tool designed to assist governments meet international obligations on human rights, prison conditions, and public health. It outlines a 100‐point action plan for implementing a response to HIV/AIDS in prisons based on international health and human rights standards, and on evaluated models of good practice.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Ami R. Moore

Attempts to address the gap in literature on the experiences of HIV/AIDS care workers in Africa through studies of professional care givers in Lome, Togo. Uses a pilot…

Abstract

Attempts to address the gap in literature on the experiences of HIV/AIDS care workers in Africa through studies of professional care givers in Lome, Togo. Uses a pilot study of 30 care givers and examines the roles, services and coping mechanisms of these individuals. Presents the demographics characteristics of the care givers and the type of services provided. Discusses how they cope with stress and their feeling regarding the prevention of HIV. Concludes they face enormous demands which may affect their own health and families. Suggests that a support network would be helpful.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 21 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

HIV/AIDS is a serious problem for prison populations across Europe and Central Asia. In most countries, rates of HIV infection are many times higher among prisoners than…

Abstract

HIV/AIDS is a serious problem for prison populations across Europe and Central Asia. In most countries, rates of HIV infection are many times higher among prisoners than among the population outside prisons. This situation is often exacerbated by high rates of hepatitis C and/or (multi‐drug resistant) tuberculosis in many countries. In most cases, high rates of HIV infection are linked to the sharing of injecting equipment both inside and outside prison walls and to unprotected sexual encounters in prison. In a majority of countries, adequate preventive measures have not been introduced in prisons, although they have been successfully introduced in other prison systems and shown to be effective. As a result, people in prison are placed at increased risk of HIV infection, and prisoners living with HIV/AIDS are placed at increased risk of health decline, of co‐infection with hepatitis C and/or tuberculosis, and of early death.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Paul Cambridge

Informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure, policy and the wider consequences of HIV testing are issues explored in this paper concerning a man with learning…

151

Abstract

Informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure, policy and the wider consequences of HIV testing are issues explored in this paper concerning a man with learning disabilities who tested positive for HIV. The events and outcomes are summarised, with lessons identified for policy and practice in HIV risk management and adult protection in services for people with learning disabilities.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Jose Catalan, Massimo Riccio and Christopher Thompson

This article sets out guidelines for psychiatric practice prepared at the request of The Royal College of Psychiatrists. It gives an overview of psychosocial and…

Abstract

This article sets out guidelines for psychiatric practice prepared at the request of The Royal College of Psychiatrists. It gives an overview of psychosocial and neuropsychiatric problems in HIV disease, service implications and guidance on HIV screening and testing. Advice is given on the issue of confidentiality in relation to HIV status, the avoidance of infection and general recommendations for implementing the guidelines and the development of any necessary special policies or practices in Mental Health Units.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Marie Claire Annette Van Hout, Flavia Zalwango, Mathias Akugizibwe, Moreen Namulundu Chaka, Charlotte Bigland, Josephine Birungi, Shabbar Jaffar, Max Bachmann and Jamie Murdoch

Women experience a triple burden of ill-health spanning non-communicable diseases (NCDs), reproductive and maternal health conditions and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

Abstract

Purpose

Women experience a triple burden of ill-health spanning non-communicable diseases (NCDs), reproductive and maternal health conditions and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa. Whilst there is research on integrated service experiences of women living with HIV (WLHIV) and cancer, little is known regarding those of WLHIV, diabetes and/or hypertension when accessing integrated care. Our research responds to this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The INTE-AFRICA project conducted a pragmatic parallel arm cluster randomised trial to scale up and evaluate “one-stop” integrated care clinics for HIV-infection, diabetes and hypertension at selected primary care centres in Uganda. A qualitative process evaluation explored and documented patient experiences of integrated care for HIV, diabetes and/or hypertension. In-depth interviews were conducted using a phenomenological approach with six WLHIV with diabetes and/or hypertension accessing a “one stop” clinic. Thematic analysis of narratives revealed five themes: lay health knowledge and alternative medicine, community stigma, experiences of integrated care, navigating personal challenges and health service constraints.

Findings

WLHIV described patient pathways navigating HIV and diabetes/hypertension, with caregiving responsibilities, poverty, travel time and cost and personal ill health impacting on their ability to adhere to multi-morbid integrated treatment. Health service barriers to optimal integrated care included unreliable drug supply for diabetes/hypertension and HIV linked stigma. Comprehensive integrated care is recommended to further consider gender sensitive aspects of care.

Originality/value

This study whilst small scale, provides a unique insight into the lived experience of WLHIV navigating care for HIV and diabetes and/or hypertension, and how a “one stop” integrated care clinic can support them (and their children) in their treatment journeys.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2022

Akm Ahsan Ullah and Ahmed Shafiqul Huque

HIV or AIDS remains invisible and dismissed by most South Asians living in Canada as HIV or AIDS issues are perceived as an offshoot of Western lifestyle linked with drug…

Abstract

Purpose

HIV or AIDS remains invisible and dismissed by most South Asians living in Canada as HIV or AIDS issues are perceived as an offshoot of Western lifestyle linked with drug use and promiscuity. This paper aims to look into how people living with HIV or AIDS (PLWHA) cope with prejudice and stigma.

Design/methodology/approach

To guide this research, a constructivist grounded theory approach was adopted as the theoretical and methodological framework. The authors reached the participants through a Toronto-based group that works with PLWHA. The authors chose their respondents in a snowball method and interviewed them both in person and online.

Findings

This paper identifies how South Asian immigrants and refugees/refugees with HIV or AIDS claimants are vulnerable to discrimination in Canada due to the following factors, which include but are not limited to: a lack of information about HIV and AIDS incidence in the community; and the Canadian health system's inability to respond appropriately to the lack of information.

Practical implications

HIV service engagements should take place within the context of a constellation of local traditions, or standardized expectations of patient engagement with HIV services can be counterproductive.

Originality/value

It is critical that governmental action prioritizes increasing public understanding of stigma. To minimize the consequences of HIV-related discrimination and stigma, misconceptions about HIV transmission must be debunked.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000