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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Anne C. Campbell

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 4.b calls to “substantially expand globally the number of scholarships” for enrollment in overseas higher education between 2015…

Abstract

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 4.b calls to “substantially expand globally the number of scholarships” for enrollment in overseas higher education between 2015 and 2020. To advance knowledge on international scholarships and sustainability, this chapter examines notions of sustainability in literature related to international scholarships for students in the Global South. Based on an exploratory review of literature, ways that sponsored international student mobility – programs, students, graduates, and networks – maintain and sustain systems and outcomes are explored. Findings are presented through four frames: (a) programmatic sustainability, (b) organizational development, (c) national sustainable development, and (d) international and global actions. Challenges to sustainability, such as poor coordination between degrees earned and local market conditions, are also discussed. In addition, the findings point to several prominent ways that scholarships could contribute to sustainability that are mostly absent from the literature: transformative education for sustainable development, and international education for environmental sustainability. The chapter closes with a vision of alumni networks – both within and among programs – to work together to transform societies and tackle the most pernicious international challenges of our time.

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Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2020
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-907-1

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Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Jeffery Cole Kreeger and Scott Smith

The purpose of this paper is to determine how much the lodging shared economy (LSE) utilizes minimum length of stay (MLOS) controls to maximize revenue and reduce…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how much the lodging shared economy (LSE) utilizes minimum length of stay (MLOS) controls to maximize revenue and reduce housekeeping expense, since cleaning between guest visits represents a substantial variable cost for each guest’s stay. Hosts in the LSE are becoming increasingly perceptive in maximizing revenues.

Design/methodology/approach

Daily data for one year were collected for Vacation Rental by Owner properties in Hilton Head Island, SC and Orlando, FL. The collected data include daily vacancies for two different lengths of stay. Linear regression was used to explore the relationship between relative demand and vacancy length of stay differences.

Findings

During high-demand periods, there were few differences between the availability of short-term and longer-term reservation vacancies, which indicated hosts were not encouraging guests to stay longer during each visit. These results reveal differences in vacancies for three-night vs six-night reservations. A host can generate more revenue and decrease expenses by maximizing booked nights per visit.

Research limitations/implications

Due to confidentiality issues, this study does not capture vacation bookings but instead captures vacancies. In addition, Average Daily Rate was not utilized in this study.

Practical implications

LSE hosts can maximize revenues using MLOS controls. Minimizing housekeeping costs boosts a host’s profitability.

Originality/value

Although this research has been conducted for hotel MLOS, there is a gap in the literature regarding LSE hosts’ use of MLOS.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Anil Bilgihan, Scott Smith, Peter Ricci and Milos Bujisic

Advances in technology and in subsequent guest-related amenities have the potential to improve the guest experience and also increase both guestroom revenues and ancillary…

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Abstract

Purpose

Advances in technology and in subsequent guest-related amenities have the potential to improve the guest experience and also increase both guestroom revenues and ancillary room revenues. Innovative technologies will be one of the prime differentiators of hotel companies in the twenty-first century. However, it is important for hoteliers to answer questions such as which technology amenities do their guests desire when choosing overnight accommodations? Further, what are the importance levels assigned by guests of these various technology amenities? This study aims to answer the question of how leisure travelers may differ or be similar to business travelers with regard to in-room technology amenities.

Design/methodology/approach

The target population of this study consisted of 2,500 US residents whose email addresses were randomly drawn from a national database company. A series of t-tests and ANOVA were conducted to answer the research questions.

Findings

High-speed internet access and guest device connectivity were perceived more important by business travelers than by leisure travelers.

Research limitations/implications

Recognizing guests’ technology needs and answering those needs are important for hotel operators to remain competitive. While some segments perceive more value in certain technologies, for others it might be an indifferent amenity.

Practical implications

The amount of time guests spend in their rooms directly correlates to increased revenues from in-room dining, in-room amenities offered and, in general, all pay-for-use products and services such as the internet and movies. Therefore, with the right assortment and offering of technology amenities, hotels will increase their revenues from these ancillary revenues. Moreover, a hotel property with the right mixture of desired in-room amenities and services can charge higher rates for their guestroom sales.

Originality/value

The results of this study provide insights into the changing attitudes toward in-room entertainment technology that many hotel developers should take note of.

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Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Chad J.R. Walker, Mary Beth Doucette, Sarah Rotz, Diana Lewis, Hannah Tait Neufeld and Heather Castleden

This research considers the potential for renewable energy partnerships to contribute to Canada's efforts to overcome its colonial past and present by developing an…

Abstract

Purpose

This research considers the potential for renewable energy partnerships to contribute to Canada's efforts to overcome its colonial past and present by developing an understanding of how non-Indigenous peoples working in the sector relate to their Indigenous partners.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is part of a larger research program focused on decolonization and reconciliation in the renewable energy sector. This exploratory research is framed by energy justice and decolonial reconciliation literatures relevant to the topic of Indigenous-led renewable energy. The authors used content and discourse analysis to identify themes arising from 10 semi-structured interviews with non-Indigenous corporate and governmental partners.

Findings

Interviewees’ lack of prior exposure to Indigenous histories, cultures and acknowledgement of settler colonialism had a profound impact on their engagement with reconciliation frameworks. Partners' perspectives on what it means to partner with Indigenous peoples varied; most dismissed the need to further develop understandings of reconciliation and instead focused on increasing community capacity to allow Indigenous groups to participate in the renewable energy transition.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, the authors intentionally spoke with non-Indigenous peoples working in the renewable energy sector. Recruitment was a challenge and the sample is small. The authors encourage researchers to extend their questions to other organizations in the renewable energy sector, across industries and with Indigenous peoples given this is an under-researched field.

Originality/value

This paper is an early look at the way non-Indigenous “partners” working in renewable energy understand and relate to topics of reconciliation, Indigenous rights and self-determination. It highlights potential barriers to reconciliation that are naïvely occurring at organizational and institutional levels, while anchored in colonial power structures.

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Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Willie Henderson

The memorial is an account of Smith's personality and work by a former and favored student. It is a sustained personal reminiscence backed by the reminiscences of others…

Abstract

The memorial is an account of Smith's personality and work by a former and favored student. It is a sustained personal reminiscence backed by the reminiscences of others who admired Smith together with an account of Smith's working practices and of his main texts. It is in this sense subjective as well as objective. It is not a full-scale biography, rather a biographical sketch and it is necessarily limited by its very proximity to the subject. The principal and other informants knew Smith and liked him. However, given Stewart's own profession, the work is more than this. It was written in the context of the consequences for Smith's reputation in the light of the French Revolution. Stewart is anxious, given the sensitivities concerning the destructive radicalism in France and in the context of the conservative reaction in Britain, to distance Smith's ideas on liberty and on policy from those ideas as they were being expressed in revolutionary France. In this way, Stewart's biographical work is both an account of Smith's life and works and a politicized interpretation of his principle economic ideas.

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-006-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/07363769110035054. When citing…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/07363769110035054. When citing the article, please cite: Scott M. Smith, David S. Alcorn, (1991), “Cause marketing: a new direction in the marketing of corporate responsibility”, Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 8 Iss: 3, pp .19 - 35.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

A.W. COATS

In 1976, amid the vastly greater celebrations of the bicentennial anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, there was the greatest orgy of historical nostalgia in…

Abstract

In 1976, amid the vastly greater celebrations of the bicentennial anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, there was the greatest orgy of historical nostalgia in the history of economics, occasioned by the bi‐centenary of the Wealth of Nations. In addition to a veritable deluge of scholarly books, articles, pamphlets, conferences, and symposia, and also innumerable popular and ephemeral effusions, all the mass media were enlisted. There were countless magazine and newspaper articles, some radio and T.V. programs, at least one especially commissioned technicolor film and, for all I know, there may also have been bicentennial poems, paintings, sculptures, and choral symphones!

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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