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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Around 80 percent of workers say that their first step towards improving job performance has nothing to do with the job itself, but is based on how they feel about…

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Abstract

Around 80 percent of workers say that their first step towards improving job performance has nothing to do with the job itself, but is based on how they feel about themselves. This is a lesson that has been taken to heart by Sargento Foods Inc. which, for the last 50 years, has remained loyal to the philosophy of its founder, Leonard Gentine Sr: “Hire good people and treat them like family.”

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Barbara Gannon and John Sterling

People and culture are a core element of strategy at the Wisconsin‐based cheese processing and marketing company, Sargento Foods. Its competitive advantage stems from the…

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Abstract

People and culture are a core element of strategy at the Wisconsin‐based cheese processing and marketing company, Sargento Foods. Its competitive advantage stems from the capabilities and loyalty of its 1,200 employees. Three interrelated business drivers define the company’s core strategy – a focus on cheese products, a commitment to outstanding customer and consumer response, and an economic engine centered on customer profitability. This three‐pronged strategy is guided by the company’s cultural philosophy – people, pride and progress. The culture and the commitment to people is the foundation for all other strategic initiatives. For over 50 years, Sargento has translated their philosophical commitment to people and culture into meaningful long‐term action through several HR programs cited in the article.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Catherine Gorrell

108

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Ana Sofia Lopes, Ana Sargento and Pedro Carreira

This paper aims to address the immediate effects of the COVID-19 crisis in the Portuguese tourism and hospitality industry by examining whether some specific…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the immediate effects of the COVID-19 crisis in the Portuguese tourism and hospitality industry by examining whether some specific characteristics make people more vulnerable or more immune to unemployment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an extensive micro-level data set of personal and job-related attributes containing all unemployed individuals in the Portuguese tourism and hospitality industry, a logit model with 56,142 observations is estimated to assess how each characteristic contributed to the unemployment odds during the COVID-19 crisis (until the end-July 2020), relatively to the pre-COVID period.

Findings

The most vulnerable workers to COVID-19 unemployment seem to be older, less educated, less qualified, women and residents in regions with a higher concentration of people and tourism activity. Moreover, the COVID-19 crisis is generating a new type of unemployment by also affecting those who were never unemployed before, with more stable jobs and more motivated at work, while reducing voluntary disruptions.

Practical implications

Public effort should be made not only to increase workforce education but especially to reinforce job-specific skills. The COVID-19 crisis has broken traditional protective measures against unemployment and separated workers from their desired occupations, which justifies new and exceptional job preservation measures. Policy recommendations are given aiming at strengthening worker resilience and industry competitiveness in the most affected sub-sectors and regions.

Originality/value

This study extends the current understanding of worker vulnerability to economic downturns. Herein, this paper used a three-level approach (combining socio-demographic, work-related and regional factors), capturing the immediate effects of the COVID-19 crisis and focussing on the tourism and hospitality industry (the hardest-hit sector worldwide).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2011

Andrés Dapuez, Andrés Dzib May and Sabrina Gavigan

In a village of Eastern Yucatan, Mexico, cargo or kuuch sponsors compare their ritual tasks to “buying life” from crosses, Catholic saints, and Mayan deities or “owners.”…

Abstract

In a village of Eastern Yucatan, Mexico, cargo or kuuch sponsors compare their ritual tasks to “buying life” from crosses, Catholic saints, and Mayan deities or “owners.” The local notion of compromiso, engagement, or commitment, helps these festival participants express the condition of possibility to successfully perform such exchanges. Decisive for these life renewals, promises, and compromisos depend upon empathy to authorize ritualists and subsume social and natural phenomena under exchange paradigms. By defining, critiquing and using the concept of “disposition” as an inherently self-other stance through which economy transforms into religiosity and vice versa, this chapter analyzes this particular regime of engagement and the temporalities it implies. Through a commitment to the past and the practice of promissory exchange, sponsors develop a new perceptual scheme in which the ritual cultivation of discipline, awareness, expectation, and responsibility are expressed.

Details

The Economics of Religion: Anthropological Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-228-9

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Thomas D. Kuczmarski

A sophisticated screening system can focus the energies of the company on creating and developing products and services that will have greater likelihood of success.

Abstract

A sophisticated screening system can focus the energies of the company on creating and developing products and services that will have greater likelihood of success.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Derek Rucker and David Dubois

This case features Bel-Brand's efforts to position its flagship brand The Laughing Cow in the United States. The challenges in this case are twofold. First, choose a…

Abstract

This case features Bel-Brand's efforts to position its flagship brand The Laughing Cow in the United States. The challenges in this case are twofold. First, choose a viable position for a brand after a period of high growth following the South Beach Craze. The difficulty here is that the initial driver of the brand's position, the South Beach Craze, an environmental factor, is dwindling and is not sustainable. Second, the brand was receiving pressure from global stakeholders to try to unify the positioning in the United States with the global brand positioning. These are both challenges that were faced by the marketing team and raised in the case.

This case can be used to teach the following topics: 1) Developing a sustainable positioning. This case gives students the valuable experience of making a positioning choice and supporting the rationale for the positioning chosen. Furthermore, it demonstrates how a brand maintained a position after the initial support/argument for that position has dwindled or disappeared. 2) Managing global versus local positioning. The case also showcases a real life example of where positioning in the United States was extremely misaligned from the global positioning of the brand, and how the brand responded to this. 3) Write a positioning statement. One important exercise that students could be asked to do is write a positioning statement and become more familiar with concepts such as point-of-parity (POP), point-of-difference (POD), and reason-to-believe (RTB).

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Norm O’Reilly, Tim Stroebel, Michael Pfahl and Jim Kahler

Sponsorship sales in professional sport is an area of increasing attention and growing investment, but the sport management literature offers only limited research about…

Abstract

Purpose

Sponsorship sales in professional sport is an area of increasing attention and growing investment, but the sport management literature offers only limited research about sales strategies and tactics. As a result, practitioners and academics alike have called for investigation in the area. In response to this need, the purpose of this paper is to empirically explore sponsorship sales in professional sport.

Design/methodology/approach

Sponsorship sales professionals working for sport properties in the four major North American sport leagues were surveyed on a variety of sponsorship sales-related variables and factors.

Findings

A total of 92 sponsorship sales professionals responded to the study, for an estimated 15.3 percent response rate. At the time of the data collection, the 92 respondents worked in the National Football League (NFL) (37), Major League Baseball (MLB) (16), National Basketball Association (NBA) (18), and National Hockey League (NHL) (21). A series of practical, conceptual, and comparative results are presented, highlighted by turnover as a problem, the importance of activation/servicing in sponsorship sales, and the high level of investment clubs are making in sponsorship sales.

Research limitations/implications

First, on “coverage,” the authors acknowledge that variations in the data can be linked, to a large extent, to reporting issues due to the nature of the study, the data, and the sample. Variations in sponsor number or training, for example, are not necessarily indicative of weaknesses in the industry, but occur because of strategic differences among properties. Second, it is important to note that not all properties had personnel respond to the study. Consequently, the figures presented in this study might be a function of the individual personnel who responded rather than a true average figure for a particular league. Third, in terms of the sample, this study deals with a very specific context in the four North American major sport leagues (NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL). Thus, one should be careful in generalizing to minor professional, collegiate, Olympic, or other sport contexts.

Practical implications

The finding of this paper states that the turnover of sponsors may be a structural issue and is certainly related to the demand for the particular property (Seaver Marketing Group, 2010). Driven by a number of factors, including technology shifts to digital channels and increased sophistication by the sponsorship sales departments of professional sport properties, a shift in the activation and service paradigm is reported and extended to the specific context of sponsorship sales.

Social implications

Results show that sport properties in the North American major sport leagues have a strong commitment to sponsorship sales by the organization (commitment of resources), by sport personnel (who support the business side), and by their sponsorship sales professionals who report satisfaction, motivation, and support from their property.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical research study specific on sponsorship sales in professional sport, thus providing direction for practice and future research on an issue of high importance to the sport industry.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2022

Abdul Rauf, Marius Zurcher, Ioannis Pantelidis and Johan Winbladh

Artificial intelligence (AI) is increasingly becoming part of the hospitality industry. In times of staff shortages, AI used in the industry can have advantages, but it…

Abstract

Purpose

Artificial intelligence (AI) is increasingly becoming part of the hospitality industry. In times of staff shortages, AI used in the industry can have advantages, but it also brings with it the possibility of customer backlash. The purpose of this paper is to understand the potential response of millennial guests to the potential applications of AI in the hotel industry. The emphasis was on which hotel service encounter categories are most suited to replacing employees with AI in the context of the millennial guest experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative research used a survey questionnaire for the data collection. Responses from 169 millennials from six continents were analysed using a combination of descriptive statistics, t-tests, MANOVA tests and Bonferroni tests.

Findings

Four service encounter categories were studied: (i) “Check-in”, (ii) “Reception Services (excl. check-in)”, (iii) “Wellness” and (iv) “Food and Beverage Services”. The results showed that of these four categories, “Food and Beverage Services” is more suited to replacing employees with AI than “Wellness”.

Practical implications

The findings of this research are important as they contribute to the body of knowledge related to the implementation of AI in the hospitality industry and provide useful information to policymakers and hotel managers who may wish to identify suitable areas for investment related to AI in their operations.

Originality/value

This study offers useful insight on a cutting-edge topic of AI application for service encounters within the hospitality sector and confirms the suitability of some encounters.

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-6666

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2022

Burak Atasoy, Oğuz Türkay and Serkan Şengül

This research examines how chain hotels respond to the crisis in the context of situational crisis communication, focusing on the first emergence of the COVID-19 crisis…

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines how chain hotels respond to the crisis in the context of situational crisis communication, focusing on the first emergence of the COVID-19 crisis and the second period of the pandemic, during which the pandemic was relatively weak.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were obtained from the digital announcements shared by the world's 50 most valuable hotel chains. The announcements, declared in the two phases of March–April and July–September 2020, were analyzed. The data were collected through document analysis and transferred to the MAXQDA program for qualitative content analysis. Interviews were held with the managers of chain companies to compare and confirm the results obtained.

Findings

Chain hotels announced regulations on existing reservations, potential customers, intermediary businesses, suppliers and employees by focusing on maintaining business reputation in the first phase of the pandemic. The hotel units seem to be more open to referrals on emergency measures from chain centers in this phase. In the second stage, announcements to increase sales were shared. The content of the crisis communication is in line with the predictions advocated under the situational crisis communication theory. In addition, some applications that do not comply with the theory are also identified.

Research limitations/implications

The effects of the crisis communication on hotels were addressed; the responses of other stakeholders to the communication were not taken into account.

Practical implications

Successful response strategies must be considered when developing future crisis preparedness measures. Actors in the hospitality industry can adopt a situational crisis communication approach as an effective strategy to cope with the losses caused by a crisis and possibly speed recovery. Hotels can turn the crisis into an opportunity with the strategies they put forward during the pandemic and gain stronger reputations after the pandemic.

Originality/value

This study contributes to both the crisis management literature and the literature on COVID-19 by exemplifying the crisis communication measures and strategies of chain hotels. Focusing on different sub-processes in the analysis of crisis communication, revealing the background about the production and transfer of the information shared during the crisis, and interpreting the content of the messages by considering the benefit of the stakeholders and benefits of the hotel reveals the originality of this study.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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