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1 – 10 of 26
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Sheena Leek, Sarah Maddock and Gordon Foxall

This paper examines the problems of launching new products onto the market, particularly healthy foods and fish products. Research was undertaken to investigate whether consumers…

1303

Abstract

This paper examines the problems of launching new products onto the market, particularly healthy foods and fish products. Research was undertaken to investigate whether consumers would be prepared to purchase a new concept, i.e. polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) fed fish, premium price PUFA fish and different species of PUFA fish, specifically salmon, eel and sturgeon. The factors influencing the respondents’ decisions were investigated. The methodology utilised a questionnaire containing both qualitative and quantitative questions and several group discussions. It was found that the majority of the sample found the concept of PUFA fish acceptable and plausible and were prepared to pay a premium price, but the number of people prepared to purchase specific PUFA species was lower. Although health was given as a main reason for purchase other factors such as image, physical appearance of the whole animal, sensory properties, the type of product and the price also had to be satisfied for a clear purchase intention to be indicated.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

David Symes and Sarah Maddock

Studies of the marketing and distribution of fish have examined adeclining industry, which, in response to trends in fish consumption andmajor developments in the food retailing…

Abstract

Studies of the marketing and distribution of fish have examined a declining industry, which, in response to trends in fish consumption and major developments in the food retailing industry, has undergone profound alterations. The shift in demand from fresh to frozen fish and the decline in the number of traditional fishmongers have been of particular importance in effecting changes in the distribution of fish. This article aims to remedy the neglect of the inland markets. By analysing their present roles and identifying their particular functions within the wider marketing system, it should be possible to offer a clearer perspective on their present and future roles.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 91 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Sarah Maddock and James A. Young

The proposed EC legislation dealing with hygiene in the fishindustry is reviewed, the reaction of industry to the proposals examinedand the wider policy implications analysed. The…

Abstract

The proposed EC legislation dealing with hygiene in the fish industry is reviewed, the reaction of industry to the proposals examined and the wider policy implications analysed. The EC proposals for fish hygiene, now in their fourth revision, will apply to all sectors of the fish industry from the point of port markets onwards; they will not now apply to the catching sector. The detailed measures specified are intended to ensure adequacy of hygiene standards throughout the marketing chain, including imports. The requirements for the monitoring and control of standards are dealt with. The proposals are considered to be significant to all industry sectors, although their precise impact will necessarily be varied. Much uncertainty still surrounds the exact implications of their adoption. It would seem desirable that further consultation takes place to ensure adoption of an appropriate and coherent programme from the outset.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Sarah Maddock and Beverley Hill

The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. The purpose of this paper is to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key source of…

1580

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between food and mood has been discussed for many years. The purpose of this paper is to extend that debate by exploring how food advertising, a key source of consumer information about food, utilises and implies varied associations between food and mood.

Design/methodology/approach

The research combines a textually oriented analysis with an analysis of the visual images in a sample of typical food advertisements drawn from women’s magazines.

Findings

Although healthy foods have the potential to enhance mood this is not often used as a key advertising message. Conversely, advertisements for foods that can depress mood frequently adopt messages of happiness and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

This exploratory research provides an initial investigation of advertising discourses of food and mood at a snapshot in time. Based on the findings derived from this limited sample, further research is suggested which would provide a more comprehensive survey of food advertising.

Practical implications

The research is of value to food promoters in suggesting that they review food messages and the use of emotional appeals in the light of developing scientific research on the link between food and mental wellbeing.

Social implications

The growing interest in promoting mental health and wellbeing means that consumers and governments are keen to understand the relationship between food and mood and its potential influence on consumer food choices.

Originality/value

This research indicates that some food advertising diverges from the scientific evidence on food and mental health and wellbeing. The research is therefore of value to food promoters and advertising regulators.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Jo McCloskey and Sarah Maddock

Environmentalism has become one of the key management concerns of the1990s but many organizations are experiencing problems in incorporatingenvironmental principles into their…

3034

Abstract

Environmentalism has become one of the key management concerns of the 1990s but many organizations are experiencing problems in incorporating environmental principles into their accepted management practices. Examines the development of environmental management systems (EMS) and considers how they may be implemented. Discusses the importance of legal and social requirements, the organization′s culture and the adaptation of its value systems to enable effective implementation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Sarah Maddock and James A. Young

Reviews the highly fragmented UK catering market and its responseto the requirements of fish consumers. Investigates the contemporarytrends within the catering sector′s leading…

950

Abstract

Reviews the highly fragmented UK catering market and its response to the requirements of fish consumers. Investigates the contemporary trends within the catering sector′s leading players. Finds that the public is becoming increasingly sophisticated in its choice of foods and is spending more when eating away from home. Argues that, despite some exceptions, many outlets, especially among hotels and restaurants, leave much to be desired. Suggests that too frequently fish is being served to sections of the catering public without any real attempt to match the offering to consumers′ wants. Indicates that alternative cuisines are growing in popularity and pose a significant threat to fish caterers who, if they do not improve their product offerings, may sink rather than swim.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Sarah Maddock, Sheena Leek and Gordon Foxall

Outlines the numerous messages sent to consumers regarding healthy eating practices and indicates the problems involved in determining whether or not the British consumer has…

3665

Abstract

Outlines the numerous messages sent to consumers regarding healthy eating practices and indicates the problems involved in determining whether or not the British consumer has adopted a nutritious and healthy diet. Research was undertaken which measured individuals’ involvement in healthy eating issues and related this to several demographic characteristics. The research indicates some variation in involvement in healthy eating according to demographic variables but the results were not statistically significant. Group discussions were also conducted which confirmed that the healthy eating messages were widely received and understood; however, there was some confusion over their content, scepticism regarding the veracity and motivation of some sources and a growing resentment of boring and puritanical themes. In the future care must be taken to produce clear, simple and positive healthy eating messages to the public if trends towards a more nutritious diet are to continue.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Sheena Leek, Sarah Maddock and Gordon Foxall

Despite having properties well‐suited to “healthy‐eating”, fish is a declining product. Consumers’ evaluations of fish are known to differ between consumers and non‐consumers, but…

2936

Abstract

Despite having properties well‐suited to “healthy‐eating”, fish is a declining product. Consumers’ evaluations of fish are known to differ between consumers and non‐consumers, but the precise differences, which might be of use in the development of a marketing campaign, are vague. Analyses suggest that the factors that influence consumer choice are predominantly environmental, and a model of situational determinants of consumption (the behavioural perspective model or BPM) is proposed as a theoretical framework. A random sample of UK consumers (n = 311) provided information on their past and intended purchasing of three types of fish product – fresh, frozen and canned – and on their beliefs regarding the consequences of fish consumption. Factor analysis reveals that such beliefs regarding fish fall into one of five components: versatility, situational relevance, negative properties, economy, and convenience. Multiple regression analysis indicates that these are differentially related to fish consumption. In general, fish consumers differed on all five factors from non‐consumers, but important deviations from this generalisation were identified for fresh, frozen and canned fish. Suggestions for marketing action and further research are derived from the practical applicability of the results and the support they provide for components of the BPM.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Isabelle Szmigin, Sarah Maddock and Marylyn Carrigan

Since the late 1990s farmers’ markets have been growing in popularity as an alternative outlet for: healthy, local, organic and non‐organic, produce consistent with the values of…

3142

Abstract

Since the late 1990s farmers’ markets have been growing in popularity as an alternative outlet for: healthy, local, organic and non‐organic, produce consistent with the values of green and ethical consumers, local and small producers to sell their goods and a venue where direct contact with the producers is possible and information about the goods may be sought. This paper seeks to explore further the concept of community as a key attribute of such markets. The paper argues that farmers’ markets can provide many of the exchanges consistent with the concept of community and that these are of significant importance to many shoppers but are particularly valued by older consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 28 December 2021

Angela Maddock and Jennifer Oates

Health-care student resilience is a well-researched topic, although the concept continues to evolve, not least as “resilience-building” has become an expected feature of…

Abstract

Purpose

Health-care student resilience is a well-researched topic, although the concept continues to evolve, not least as “resilience-building” has become an expected feature of health-care student professional education. The study aimed to understand the concept of resilience from the point of view of student nurses and midwives.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a novel arts-informed method, informed by Miller’s and Turkle’s work on “evocative objects.” A total of 25 student nurses and midwives from a London-based university selected “resilience objects” which were photographed and discussed during interviews with an artist-researcher.

Findings

Analysis of the interviews revealed that “resilience” was founded on identity, connection, activity and protection. “Resilience objects” were used in everyday rituals and “resilience” was a characteristic that developed over time through the inhabiting of multiple identities.

Practical implications

Given that resilience is intertwined with notions of identity, health-care faculties should enhance students’ sense of identity, including, but not exclusively, nursing or midwifery professional identity, and invite students to develop simple rituals to cope with the challenges of health-care work.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to locate health-care students’ resilience in specific material objects. Novel insights are that health-care students used everyday rituals and everyday objects to connect to their sense of purpose and manage their emotions, as means of being resilient.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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