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Publication date: 4 May 2018

Martina, Nurasih Shamadiyah and Riyandhi Praza

Purpose – This study aims to analyze the contribution of revenue and consumption cost of soybean farmers.Design/Methodology/Approach – Data analysis was done by…

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to analyze the contribution of revenue and consumption cost of soybean farmers.

Design/Methodology/Approach – Data analysis was done by quantitative descriptive analysis. Data were obtained in the form of numbers then the results of the obtained data were presented in the form of a systematic description. The sample in this study is the entire population of soybean farmers in Muara Batu, Aceh Utara by using census method as much as 50 farmers.

Findings – The results showed that the contribution of soybean farm revenue amounted to 6.94%, non-soybean farming amounted to 48.12%, and out farm activities amounted to 44.94%. This indicates that soybean farming activities are enough to contribute to increase the family revenue. Meanwhile, the average amount of household cost for food is 16,696,800 IDR/Year and for non-food is 8,397,500 IDR/Year. The analysis shows that although the contribution of soybean farming revenue is the lowest than the other farms’ revenue, it is very helpful to the farmers for fulfilling the needs of family consumption cost every year.

Research Limitations/Implications – The object of this research is to study all the farmers who utilize the land for soybean farming in Muara Batu. The research limitations are income contribution and consumption cost of soybean farmers.

Practical Implications – The amount of soybean production produced by farmers is much lower. However, the farmers can still increase their income if the amount of production can be increased by more intensification of soybean farming as tough as the use of superior varieties of soil processing, organic fertilizer on soil, balanced and integrated pest control, and harvesting and post-harvesting to reduce food loses.

Originality/Value – The farmers earned revenue not only from soybeans, but also from non-soybean farm and out farm. Soybean farming activities aim to increase revenues in order to meet the needs of the family that consist of food and non–food consumptions.

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Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Andi Irawan, Saefudin Saefudin, Melli Suryanty and M. Zulkarnain Yuliarso

This study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the oil palm smallholders' income, which includes both on-farm and off-farm resources.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the oil palm smallholders' income, which includes both on-farm and off-farm resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a simultaneous equations system for arranging the oil palm household economic model.

Findings

The results showed that the negative effect of demand disruption (decreasing of household income) is more than supply disruption (production declining). Declining household income due to COVID-19 caused farmer households to have no access to both basic need and other goods.

Research limitations/implications

The samples for before-pandemic data differed from the situation during COVID-19 in both the location and the person due to technical constraints in research sites.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study was providing an empirical understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic influences the economic behavior of the most vulnerable entities in the Indonesian palm oil industry (oil palm smallholder farmers' households). This study would provide baseline information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economy of oil palm smallholder's household income.

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Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Andrew W. Stevens and Karin Wu

The purpose of this article is to investigate how land tenure correlates with measures of profitability among young farmers and ranchers in the United States. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate how land tenure correlates with measures of profitability among young farmers and ranchers in the United States. The authors hypothesize that young producers who own a larger proportion of their operation face different incentives between short- and long-run returns than young producers who primarily rent their land. The authors analyze whether these differing incentives result in observable differences in various measures of profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use state-level data from the Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) from 2003 to 2018 to estimate fixed-effects panel models correlating land tenure with the value of farm production, expenditures on repairs and maintenance, net farm income, total operator household income from farming, rate of return on assets (ROA) and rate of return on equity (ROE).

Findings

The authors find different correlations for crop farms and livestock farms, as well as different correlations for farms with the lowest and highest gross sales. For crop farms, renting land is associated with higher production, higher income, higher ROA and higher ROE. For livestock farms, renting land is associated with lower production.

Originality/value

This study rigorously investigates the role of land tenure specifically among young farmers and ranchers in the United States. By better understanding how land ownership affects profitability among beginning farmers and ranchers, policymakers will be able to better target public resources to support the next generation of producers.

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Agricultural Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2021

Linyi Zheng and Wenrong Qian

This study explores how the land tenure system helps in protecting land quantity during agricultural production by estimating the influence of land certification on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores how the land tenure system helps in protecting land quantity during agricultural production by estimating the influence of land certification on cropland abandonment, its mechanisms and its heterogeneous effects among groups at the provincial, community and household levels.

Design/methodology/approach

To deal with potential homogeneity concerns, the authors investigate the impact of land certification on the area of abandoned croplands using nationally representative panel data from the 2017 and 2019 China Rural Household Panel Survey on 15,000 households across 29 provinces and time-varying difference-in-differences and propensity score matching-difference-in-differences models.

Findings

Land certification significantly contributes to the protection of land quantity during agricultural production, and it reduces the area of abandoned croplands by at least 4%. This effect is mainly achieved by improving soil fertility, promoting land transfer, increasing the availability of agricultural subsidies and raising agricultural income. However, while land certification benefits farmers in nonmajor grain-producing areas and western regions, in plain, remote and nonpolitically central villages, and farmers who have not undergone land transfer or land adjustment, it is not beneficial for others.

Research limitations/implications

In the postepidemic era, food security based on the protection of the amount of cultivated land becomes increasingly important. It is realistic and inevitable to rationally use every inch of cultivated land and curb the cropland abandonment by strengthening land tenure system reform, especially in the case of the insecurity of land tenure.

Practical implications

There are various factors affecting farmers' cropland abandonment, such as poor soil fertility, unavailable land transfer, too little agricultural subsidies and too low agricultural income, but the root cause is the insecurity of land tenure. Empirical evidence from rural China has shown that a clear definition and effective protection of property rights can help curb the cropland abandonment. Enhancing the land protection behavior of farmers through the reform of land certification and promoting the sustainable use of land are what the reform of land tenure system should be.

Social implications

Cultivated land, as the material carrier and endowment basis of grain production, is of great importance to safeguarding national food security, especially in the postepidemic era. At the present stage, it is still necessary for most developing countries to strengthen the construction of land tenure system, to carry out land certification reform and to issue farmers with clearly defined and legally effective land certificates. Equally important, efforts also should be made to promote the diversified utilization of the achievements of the certification after the completion of land certification reform in China and other developing countries.

Originality/value

Expropriation and occupation of croplands are essential in protecting land quantity during rapid urbanization, and so is reducing cropland abandonment during agricultural production; therefore, it deserves close attention. In this regard, this study estimates the impact of land certification on the area of abandoned croplands, examines its possible mechanisms and identifies its heterogeneous effects to test the applicability of the property rights theory in the Chinese context and enrich the relevant literature and provide Chinese evidence for other developing countries to strengthen the protection of land quantity, by deepening the reform of the land tenure system under different circumstances.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Divine Odame Appiah, Felix Asante, Lois Antwi-Boadi and Richard Serbeh

This paper aims to examine elderly smallholder farmers’ perceptions of and adaptation to climate variability and change in the Offinso Municipality, Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine elderly smallholder farmers’ perceptions of and adaptation to climate variability and change in the Offinso Municipality, Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were analyzed with frequencies and chi-square tests, whereas qualitative data were thematically analyzed.

Findings

The results showed that elderly smallholder farmers’ knowledge of climate variability and climate change were based on their sex, level of formal education and experience in farming. Elderly smallholder farmers adopted both on-farm and off-farm strategies to cope with climate change and variability. The vulnerability of elderly smallholder farmers to climate change calls for social protection mechanisms such as a pension scheme that guarantees access to monthly cash transfers. Such a scheme will ease constraints to livelihood and ensure improved well-being.

Originality/value

Elderly smallholder farmers have remained invisible in discourses on perceptions and adaptation to climate change despite the surge in number of this category of farmers. This paper therefore represents an attempt to highlight the experiences of elderly smallholder farmers with climate variability and change.

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Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

G.P. Archer, Judit García Sánchez, Gianpaolo Vignali and Aurélie Chaillot

The purpose of the research was to extend on previous research by studying latent consumers’ attitude to farmers’ markets. Findings will be used to improve the marketing…

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Abstract

The purpose of the research was to extend on previous research by studying latent consumers’ attitude to farmers’ markets. Findings will be used to improve the marketing and publicity of farmers’ markets in order to attract other consumers groups. The people surveyed were not always aware of the term farmers’ market. Some think it is a place where farmers go to buy what they need. Around 94 per cent of people who have already been to a farmers’ market will return because they enjoy the food which is fresh, different, local, etc. and to support farmers. Latent consumers think that farmers’ markets sell fresh, quality, locally produced, tastier, healthier and seasonal food. However they do not expect the food to be cheaper. The most important criteria are quality, freshness and the fact that food is produced locally. Latent consumers would enjoy supporting local producers, information about the products and how to prepare them.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

S.A.E. Bates and Naomi Pattisson

Examines UK milk pricing since market deregulation in November 1994. Finds a wide range of milk price contracts on offer, with many processing companies paying prices…

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Abstract

Examines UK milk pricing since market deregulation in November 1994. Finds a wide range of milk price contracts on offer, with many processing companies paying prices above those paid by the voluntary farmer co‐operatives. Looks at the factors influencing dairy farmers’ initial choice of milk supply contract in the months preceding deregulation of the UK dairy sector in November 1994. Finds around 70 per cent of farmers surveyed, slightly above the percentage for all milk producers, signed to supply the voluntary farmers co‐operative, Milk Marque. Then surveys farmers to identify those who have switched supply contract during the year, finding little evidence of movement. Attempts to understand the apparent differences between farmers’ expectations in their initial contract choice and the market realities they have experienced over that period.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Hepi Rahmawati and Anastasia Maylinda Titi Lestari

With the shifting patterns of rain and dry periods as a result of global climate change, the people of Gunungkidul have to deal with extreme conditions, such as crop…

Abstract

Purpose

With the shifting patterns of rain and dry periods as a result of global climate change, the people of Gunungkidul have to deal with extreme conditions, such as crop failure, ponds and artificial lakes drying up at an alarming rate due to high evaporation. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Participatory disaster and risks assessment and action planning were carried out to identify how communities perceive risks and identify priorities of actions. Farmers agreed to implement climate adaptive farming which combines organic farming, biological pest control and drought-resistant seedlings from local varieties.

Findings

The processes to adaptation required collective actions, paradigm shift and it also constitutes trial and error processes. Acceptance to innovation is mostly one of the major challenges. Working with “contact” farmers and “advance” farmers is the key to the community organizing strategy for innovation and adaptation.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is limited to the adaptation program funded by Indonesia Climate Change Trust Fund in four farmer groups in Purwosari Sub-District, GunungKidul district and Yogyakarta province, Indonesia.

Practical implications

Trainings and direct assistance to climate adaptive farming have benefitted the farmers that they are able to increase the farming production and reduce the risk of crop failure.

Social implications

The demonstration plot has strengthened farmer groups’ social modalities by working together to shift from traditional into adaptive farming.

Originality/value

This case study described how farmers have shifted from traditional practice into climate adaptive farming.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Matthew Maher and David Emanuel

Fonterra Group Cooperative Limited, New Zealand’s largest company, is owned by the dairy farmers who supply milk. Each dairy farmer owns the same number of shares as the…

Abstract

Fonterra Group Cooperative Limited, New Zealand’s largest company, is owned by the dairy farmers who supply milk. Each dairy farmer owns the same number of shares as the kilograms of milksolids supplied. Farmers therefore have an investment in Fonterra, and when a farm is purchased, there is a concomitant investment in off‐farm assets. As a consequence farmers are likely to be poorly diversified. This paper provides estimates of the cost of being undiversified or only partly diversified, using the same method that Meulbroek has used in assessing the cost to pension beneficiaries when the pension scheme reinvests in the employer’s stock, and when executives hold executive stock options. The costs depend upon the degree of “under‐diversification”, the duration of Fonterra’s cash flows and the period over which the co‐operative structure will persist. Using data from Nestlé, we estimate the loss to an undiversified farmer at up to 63% of the value of his/her investment, with the estimate depending on the assumed market risk premium. If farmers are at least partly diversified or the cooperative structure will not persist indefinitely, then these losses will be less.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Norma Gomez

– This paper aims to assess the vulnerability of the farmer-respondents in Southern Philippines, specifically Region XI and XII, to climate change.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the vulnerability of the farmer-respondents in Southern Philippines, specifically Region XI and XII, to climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an empirical analysis of the impact of climate change on maize (Zea mays), banana (Musa sapientum) and durian (Durio zibethinus) production. Furthermore, it estimated the determinants of adaptation to climate change and its corresponding effect on farm productivity. The analysis used primary data from 541 farmer-respondents producing maize, banana and durian in the 6 provinces and 18 municipalities of the sample areas.

Findings

Based on the probit estimate results, farmers adaptation decisions were influenced by information about future climate change conditions, social capital, access to formal extension and farmer-to-farmer extension. The author found from the stochastic frontier estimation in the production function that climate change adaptations exerted a significant impact on farm productivity. It helped in coping with the adverse effects and risk of climate change while increasing agricultural productivities of the farmer-respondents.

Originality/value

This research paper will be an addition to the body of knowledge on the socioeconomic aspects on the climate change and adaptation on the production of maize, banana and durian in the case of a developing country like Southern Philippines. This will bring more insights into the adaptation strategies that are crucial to cope with climatic variability and change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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