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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Anette Pettersson and Christina Fjellstrom

Discusses the role of food marketing to children and how responsible marketing may facilitate healthy foodways.

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2130

Abstract

Purpose

Discusses the role of food marketing to children and how responsible marketing may facilitate healthy foodways.

Design/methodology/approach

Reports research on children as consumers and the consumer socialization process, where the role of media and brands are stronger influencing agents than before. Describes the criticism against child advertisements and the use of entertainment in marketing to children, especially in positioning unhealthy food products. Continues with describing the industry’s response in terms of conducting responsible marketing through self‐regulation.

Findings

Suggests that healthy food habits can be facilitated by making healthy food available, by promoting well‐being and through making healthy food entertaining. Several aspects in children’s experiences of fun ought to be considered in the marketing process. Responsible acting among producers and marketers is a way of forming emotional relationships and thus of creating consumer loyalty.

Practical implications

Several parallel actions are suggested to establish healthy food habits; consumer education among children along with legal restrictions and responsible marketing. The cultural meaning of food makes a subject for future research on promoting healthy food habits. It is further suggested that marketers, teachers and nutritionists should learn from each other to establish healthy eating among children and their families.

Originality/value

Responsible marketing in making healthy food attractive to children and their families makes an advantageous alternative satisfying both industry and consumer needs in the long run.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Yuri Seo, Angela Gracia B. Cruz and Kim-Shyan Fam

– The purpose of this paper is to identify a need to incorporate Asian perspectives in theories of food consumption and marketing.

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2514

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify a need to incorporate Asian perspectives in theories of food consumption and marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial discusses the mutually recursive relationship between food and culture in Asian markets, offers an integrative summary of the special issue and develops several key themes for future research.

Findings

Food consumption plays a central role within Asian cultures and markets. Thus, understanding Asian perspectives and contexts provides an important complement and contrast to current theories of food consumption and marketing that have been primarily sited in North American and European contexts. In particular, the complex multiplicity of Asian consumer cultures creates dynamic heterogeneity within Asian food markets.

Research limitations/implications

Although food consumption plays a central role in Asian consumer cultures, extant theory regarding Asian food consumption and marketing is still in its infancy. We highlight important developments in this area that suggest a path for future work.

Originality/value

The authors make three contributions to the literature on food consumption and marketing. First, while engaging with these questions, this issue points to the importance of Asian cultural perspectives into the marketing literature on food consumption. Second, through the articles of this special issue, we trace the relationships between food consumption practices, marketing practices and cultural multiplicity in Asian contexts. Finally, we draw the threads together to provide directions for future research in this area.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Rosalind Jones and Jennifer Rowley

This article aims to address the paucity of research in relation to eating establishments and food marketing by focussing on the public house sector in the UK.

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1216

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to address the paucity of research in relation to eating establishments and food marketing by focussing on the public house sector in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses secondary data and a qualitative case study approach to investigate pub food marketing in independent public houses based in North Wales, UK.

Findings

The public house sector is a market in decline. Challenges in the market are identified, however, provision of food as part of the market offering provides vital opportunities for additional profit and sustainability. Successful pub food marketing includes: understanding customers; targeting and controlling future markets; e‐marketing; promoting the pub theme/environment; promotion of food “value”; community involvement; and employee training.

Research limitations/implications

Although this is only one small sample of independent public houses, this research provides indications of the marketing issues related to food and dining out, for managers of pubs and other restaurant establishments generally.

Practical implications

The article provides a comprehensive list of marketing issues and solutions that will be useful to publicans and restaurateurs.

Originality/value

This research furthers knowledge and understanding in relation to the marketing of pub food and the marketing of eating establishments in general. Marketing of food is complex; it requires an understanding of the dynamism between the eating establishment, the tourist destination and community base together with an understanding of the combined food product and service offering, and the overall dining experience.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Rebecca C. Den Hoed and Charlene Elliott

Despite their responsibility for mitigating the influence of commercial culture on children, parents' views of fun food marketing aimed at children remain largely…

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1267

Abstract

Purpose

Despite their responsibility for mitigating the influence of commercial culture on children, parents' views of fun food marketing aimed at children remain largely unexplored. This article aims to probe parents' views of supermarket fun foods and the packaging used to promote them to children.

Design/methodology/approach

In total 60 in‐depth interviews were conducted with parents from different educational backgrounds, living in three different Canadian cities. Interview responses were analyzed and coded thematically using an iterative process in keeping with grounded theory.

Findings

Parents generally discussed the promotion of supermarket fun foods to children as either an issue of the nutritional quality of foods promoted to children and/or in light of the communication quality of marketing aimed at children. Parents were also divided along education lines: parents with higher educational backgrounds were more likely to oppose fun foods and praise more pastoral ideals food production and consumption, while those with less education more often praised fun foods.

Research limitations/implications

These findings cannot be generalized to other parents or parents in other countries. The findings, however, suggest that a more nuanced consideration of differences within and across parents' views is warranted in debates about responsible marketing to children.

Originality/value

This article provides a qualitatively rich snapshot of the views of 60 Canadian parents regarding child‐targeted food marketing, and raises important questions about how to incorporate parents' views into discussions about responsible marketing, rather than presuming they are all of one mindset.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Lisa B. Hurwitz, Heather Montague, Alexis R. Lauricella, Aubry L. Alvarez, Francesca Pietrantonio, Meredith L. Ford and Ellen Wartella

Social cognitive theory suggests that children may have more favorable attitudes toward food products promoted by media characters who are similar to them, in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

Social cognitive theory suggests that children may have more favorable attitudes toward food products promoted by media characters who are similar to them, in terms of factors such as age, gender and race-ethnicity. This paper aims to profile the characters in food and beverage websites and apps for children and examine whether the healthfulness of promoted products varies as a function of character background.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes two parallel content analyses focused on websites and apps that were produced by America’s top selling food and beverage companies.

Findings

There were very few child-targeted websites and apps, but those that existed were replete with media characters. These websites/apps tended to feature media characters with diverse gender, age and racial–ethnic backgrounds. However, marketing featuring adult and male characters promoted particularly unhealthy foods.

Social implications

American food companies, many of whom signed voluntary self-regulatory pledges through the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative, should make a more concerted effort to refrain from featuring appealing media characters in child-directed new media marketing. Whether conscious or not, it seems as if food marketers may be leveraging characters to appeal to a wide audience of children of varied demographic backgrounds.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this manuscript is the only research to focus specifically on the demographic profiles (i.e. gender, age and race-ethnicity) of characters in food websites and the nutritional quality of the products they promote. It is also the first to systematically examine media characters in food apps in any capacity.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Mohamed E. Mohamed, Mahmoud Hewedi, Xinran Lehto and Magdy Maayouf

Given the increased importance of food in tourists’ travel experience, the purpose of this paper is to explore the current and future potential of local food and foodways…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increased importance of food in tourists’ travel experience, the purpose of this paper is to explore the current and future potential of local food and foodways in marketing Egyptian destinations online.

Design/methodology/approach

The content of 20 Egyptian destination marketing organization (DMO) websites was subject to a content analysis. A checklist was developed based on literature analysis. The frequencies of information related to food culture and cuisine marketing were tallied, followed by a qualitative assessment of contents from the various websites. The results were further discussed with DMO representatives to provide contextualized insights as to the future potential of utilizing local food and food tourism initiatives as a component of DMOs website marketing in Egypt.

Findings

The study noted some initial efforts for Egyptian DMO websites to market food culture and gastronomic practices; however, the results suggest that the usage of food culture on Egyptian DMOs websites is still in its infancy. The study also highlights the challenges that need to be tackled as well as the resources required for food tourism development.

Practical implications

This study illustrates the need and potential capacity of Egyptian DMO websites to market food culture and local cuisines (including traditional foods and table manners). These results are expected to help Egyptian DMOs to strategically embrace local cuisine and food culture as a vehicle for destination marketing.

Originality/value

This case study provides insights for African and other developing economies in their destination marketing. The proposed framework and guidelines are intended to potentially serve as a framework for destination marketers and entrepreneurs to optimize the tourism potential of food culture.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Charlene Elliott

This paper aims to examine current regulatory initiatives on food marketing to young people and to highlight unique considerations when it comes to teenagers.

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1662

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine current regulatory initiatives on food marketing to young people and to highlight unique considerations when it comes to teenagers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper integrates the policy and public health literature with the literature on childhood studies and consumer studies.

Findings

Since the policy goal is to mitigate the impact of food marketing on young people’s attitudes and behaviours, it is necessary to recognize the consumer competencies of teenagers and consider the social and symbolic meanings of food for them. It is suggested that radical media literacy, coupled with food literacy, is essential to navigating a complex food environment filled with promotional messages for ultra-processed foods.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis has implications for policy development.

Practical implications

Consideration of age – in terms of different developmental competencies, motivating factors and additional initiatives to support healthy eating (such as teaching media literacy skills) – is necessary to policy development related to food marketing to children.

Originality/value

Little research integrates the literature on food policy/regulation with the critical work on consumer studies/childhood studies. This commentary also directs attention to novel areas of consideration related to teenagers and food marketing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Georgina Cairns, Marisa De Andrade and Jane Landon

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility and utility of developing an independently defined and accredited benchmark standard for responsible food marketing

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility and utility of developing an independently defined and accredited benchmark standard for responsible food marketing. To identify provisional evidence and insights on factors likely to be critical to its successful development and its capacity to strengthen the effectiveness of responsible food marketing policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Desk-based cross-policy domain case study.

Findings

There is promising evidence that the development and deployment of an evidence-based, independently defined and verified responsible food marketing standard is feasible. Provisional findings on factors critical to the development of an effective standard and strategically significant evidence gaps are presented as insights in support of future food marketing policy and research planning.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation of these preliminary findings is required.

Practical implications

The study has provisionally identified an innovative intervention with the potential to strengthen statutory, voluntary and internationally coordinated food marketing control policy approaches.

Originality/value

This is the first report of research into the potential for an independent benchmark standard to advance and strengthen responsible food marketing policy goals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Jean‐Joseph Cadilhon, Andrew P. Fearne, Paule Moustier and Nigel D. Poole

This article presents a conceptual framework for the analysis of vegetable supply chains in a South East Asian context and the role wholesale markets play in these chains…

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4970

Abstract

This article presents a conceptual framework for the analysis of vegetable supply chains in a South East Asian context and the role wholesale markets play in these chains. Following a review of the literature on food marketing systems in developing countries and preliminary fieldwork in South East Asia, a holistic framework is proposed, including what are perceived to be the critical factors in the development of improved fresh food marketing systems: domestic legal and policy factors, international trade policies and food markets, history, geography, and cultural and social norms. The particular role of trust and collaboration among stakeholders in the Ho Chi Minh City vegetable marketing system is highlighted.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Natalia Vila-Lopez and Inés Küster-Boluda

The basis of this paper is to carry on a bibliometric analysis to investigate how “marketing” decisions have affected “packaging” success in different disciplines. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The basis of this paper is to carry on a bibliometric analysis to investigate how “marketing” decisions have affected “packaging” success in different disciplines. This analysis covers from the first paper published on this topic (in 1956) to the last papers published in 2019.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,170 scientific papers (including 14,177 citations within those papers) were retrieved from the Web of Science (WOS) and Scopus, dated from 1956 to 2019. Scimat software was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results of this paper show that two main sectors constitute the focus of packaging studies from a marketing approach: food and tobacco. Recently, the main topics of research have evolved towards sustainable and health packaging, concerning different agents involved in packaging decisions: retailers, marketers, consumers and producers. So, both lines of research represent promising lines of research.

Originality/value

Three different investigating profiles (i.e. engineers, marketers-psychologists and doctors-scientists) have examined how packaging should be prepared to succeed. However, a holistic bibliometric analysis about “packaging” and “marketing” is missing from those three branches of knowledge. This study is important to guide future lines of research to fill the identified gaps.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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