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Article

Jeremy Leach, Heather Mercer, Graham Stew and Stephen Denyer

The notion of consumer sovereignty is not a new concept. However to effectively use it as a tool to improve food hygiene standards, proprietors of eating‐places must know…

Abstract

The notion of consumer sovereignty is not a new concept. However to effectively use it as a tool to improve food hygiene standards, proprietors of eating‐places must know what customers look for to assess those standards. It is also important that customers demonstrate their unwillingness to buy from unhygienic premises. This article summarises research, using the “Delphi Technique”, backed up by semi‐structured interviews which has established a body of new knowledge about the subject. Conclusions are drawn about the relevance of food hygiene standards to running an effective business and the need for a public education campaign. The results also challenge current views about the importance of food hygiene standards to customers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Olivia M. Wall and Maura P. Smiddy

Hand hygiene is the single most important intervention to reduce the risk of acquiring infection. All healthcare workers and healthcare students have a responsibility to…

Abstract

Purpose

Hand hygiene is the single most important intervention to reduce the risk of acquiring infection. All healthcare workers and healthcare students have a responsibility to prevent transmission of infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate students’ attitudes to hand hygiene following university-based education and practice placement. Students attended a lecture, completed an e-learning module, participated in a practical session using a ultra-violet light hand inspection cabinet and engaged in clinical placement.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 64 students participated in a multimodal hand hygiene education programme before clinical placement, with each student completing an in-class questionnaire after placement. Data were analysed using descriptive and comparative statistics. Students rated educational methods that had most influence on them. Their preference was for a practical hand hygiene education session. Students were also influenced by the therapist they were on placement with. They were least influenced by the didactic college presentation.

Findings

This study highlights that students may be influenced by different methods of education at different stages in their course and that placement may be an important influencing factor in the earlier years of occupational therapy education.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the importance of the availability of a multimodal educational approach and clinical placement to promote increased compliance with hand hygiene amongst students.

Practical implications

University healthcare course curricula should include multimodal approaches to the education of hand hygiene. While hand hygiene e-learning modules are beneficial, they should be used in conjunction with a multimodal educational strategy that incorporates practical elements. The influence of the therapist on a students’ behaviour should be utilised to improve both student and professionals hand hygiene adherence.

Originality/value

Original piece of work that is not widely discussed in Occupational Therapy literature.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

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Article

Denise Worsfold and Philip Mark Worsfold

The purpose of this paper is to determine the utility to consumers of hygiene disclosure schemes for eating places.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the utility to consumers of hygiene disclosure schemes for eating places.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of hygiene disclosure schemes operated by local authorities in the UK was examined for features that might be expected to influence consumer awareness and behaviour.

Findings

The survey revealed that schemes differed in the interpretation of scores, the extent of information disclosed, the communication channels used to disclose information and the amount of publicity provided for businesses and the public. The majority of schemes provide certificates which businesses are encouraged to display prominently. Hygiene inspection information is posted on the web sites of all the local authorities.

Research limitations/implications

The number of schemes in this study was limited. A comprehensive evaluation of the current UK “Scores on Doors” schemes will have to take into account a large number of schemes with a very large number of variables, making its feasibility questionable.

Practical implications

The “Scores on Doors” schemes will only be successful if the public are fully aware of them and the schemes are well respected. They will have to be well publicised, to operate in an open, transparent manner and be consistent and fair. This study shows that, although the schemes have some features in common, there is considerable lack of consistency, particularly in the representation of scores as symbols.

Originality/value

Published evaluations of hygiene disclosure schemes relate to schemes operating outside the UK. This study examines some of the features of current UK schemes that will require consideration if a consistent nation‐wide scheme is to be developed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Ismail Hussein Amzat, Yahya Don, Sofian Omar Fauzee, Fauzi Hussin and Arumugam Raman

In a world in which successful learning is believed to rest on the methods of teaching and the performance of students is determined by teacher quality, it is clear that…

Abstract

Purpose

In a world in which successful learning is believed to rest on the methods of teaching and the performance of students is determined by teacher quality, it is clear that teachers are the backbone of student learning attainments. In such a scenario, teacher development, welfare, motivation, and satisfaction are crucial for better teaching performance. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to determine the motivator and hygiene factors among excellent teachers in Malaysia and to explore factors that lead to satisfaction and cause dissatisfaction among excellent teachers in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses quantitative design to determine the motivator and hygiene factors among excellent teachers. For the sample size, 306 excellent teachers participated in this study and data were analysed using principle component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis to determine the dominant factor among Herzberg’s motivator and hygiene factors.

Findings

From the findings, the results showed that the satisfaction of excellent teachers was low in terms of “personal growth” (motivator) and “supervision” (hygiene). The paper concludes by calling upon the Malaysian Ministry of Education (MoE) to consider both motivator and hygiene factors, and what causes satisfaction and dissatisfaction among excellent teachers.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations to be considered, especially in terms of sample size. The low number of excellent teachers participating in this study is due to the scarcity of face-to-face data collection, in that an online survey was deemed to be the only means to reach the excellent teachers. This is due to the lack of a list of excellent teachers in some state districts, making it difficult to determine those schools which have excellent teachers. In addition, it is also due to logistical and geographical difficulties in reaching certain schools and meeting the excellent teachers. In recognition of such difficulties in undertaking research on excellent teachers in Malaysia, the researchers in this study urge the Malaysian MoE, as well as state districts and regional offices, to update the profile of excellent teachers by creating records and a list of all excellent teachers in Malaysia to facilitate future research. In this scenario, the findings of this study should be used with caution and not be generalized to other contexts, schools, regions, or states.

Practical implications

To be fully cognizant about the excellent teachers’ scheme was introduced to uplift the standard of teaching in Malaysia, and the recipients of this scheme or status (excellent) are considered to be the “cream of the crop” in the teaching profession in Malaysia and for non-excellent teachers to emulate, it is vital to look into their well-being as well as their growth. With the results of this study, the authors can say that the implications for practice touch many aspects of the professional and personal development of Malaysian excellent teachers. Specifically, it is imperative that the factors that intrinsically and extrinsically motivate excellent teachers in Malaysia and the causes of dissatisfaction are identified. In addition, the implications also place emphasis on paving ways for the personal growth of excellent teachers and to provide leeway for them to pursue their own personal happiness. Furthermore, the implications of the lack of proper supervision of school principals on excellent teachers should be avoided, and, in general, hygiene factors could be used as positive implications to improve excellent teachers’ teaching practices and performance.

Originality/value

This research is original as it calls MoE attention to the well-being of excellent teachers in Malaysia. As excellent teachers in Malaysia are selected and promoted among teachers in Malaysia in order to improve teaching and learning in Malaysia. They are appointed to be a role model for other teachers to emulate. With this position, excellent teachers are expected to contribute to the development of their schools and others and they can be posted anywhere as well as called at any time for help. Therefore, it is worthy to know how satisfied those excellent teachers are regarding government policy. Hence, it is important to know what motivates and satisfies them.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article

Denise Worsfold, Chris Griffith and Philip Worsfold

In both their enforcement and training role environmental health officers (EHOs) may influence businesses' attitudes to hygiene training. A survey was conducted to examine…

Abstract

In both their enforcement and training role environmental health officers (EHOs) may influence businesses' attitudes to hygiene training. A survey was conducted to examine EHOs' experience and perceptions of the provision and effectiveness of food hygiene training in small food businesses. The results indicate that officers had concerns about the content and the delivery of hygiene courses and about the quality of other hygiene trainers. Officers use the industry guides to advise on training but receive limited guidance on the assessment of hygiene training in the workplace. The checking of training records was considered to be less important than the use of observation and questioning for assessing hygiene training effectiveness. Environmental factors, such as supervisor support and situational aids were judged by officers to be important factors in the implementation of workplace hygiene training. They reported low levels of formal refresher training and active support of training by management.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Georgina Holt and Spencer J. Henson

Directive 93/43/EEC introduced the concept of good hygiene practice, in response to a pan‐European increase in the incidence of food poisoning, to foster a preventive…

Abstract

Directive 93/43/EEC introduced the concept of good hygiene practice, in response to a pan‐European increase in the incidence of food poisoning, to foster a preventive approach to food safety. UK legislation reinforces the EU position that food businesses are responsible for the implementation of good hygiene practices. The response of the food industry has been to develop audited standards of hygiene, higher than explicit legal requirements. Small businesses have, however, been slow to adopt industry hygiene standards. A case study of small manufacturers of ready to eat meat products investigated the reasons for this. Businesses were first audited to the EFSIS[1] standard, to compare current practice with recommended best practice. Second, technical managers or owner‐managers were interviewed, to gain an insight into their knowledge of industry standards in particular, and the process of hygiene management in general. The analysis found significant differences in the knowledge of technical managers and owner‐managers, with the latter often unaware of the existence of audited standards. It is argued, therefore, that, in order to increase the implementation of good hygiene practices, further programmes to inform small food businesses about industry standards are required.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Solange Umulisa, Angele Musabyimana, Rex Wong, Eva Adomako, April Budd and Theoneste Ntakirutimana

The purpose of this study is to improve the hand hygiene compliance in a hospital in Rwanda. Hand hygiene is a fundamental routine practice that can greatly reduce risk of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to improve the hand hygiene compliance in a hospital in Rwanda. Hand hygiene is a fundamental routine practice that can greatly reduce risk of hospital-acquired infections; however, hand hygiene compliance in the hospital was low.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-strategy intervention was implemented with a focus on ensuring stable water supply was available through installing mobile hand hygiene facilities.

Findings

The intervention significantly increased the overall hand hygiene compliance rate by 35 per cent. The compliance for all of the five hand hygiene moments and all professions also significantly increased.

Practical implications

By implementing an intervention that involved multiple strategies to address the root causes of the problem, this quality improvement project successfully created an enabling environment to increase hand hygiene compliance. The hospital should encourage using the strategic problem-solving method to conduct more quality improvement projects in other departments.

Originality/value

Findings from this study may be useful for hospitals in similar settings seeking to improve hand hygiene compliance.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article

Anita Eves, Gill Bielby, Bernadette Egan, Margaret Lumbers, Monique Raats and Martin Adams

The purpose of this research is to show the evaluation of food hygiene knowledge and self‐reported behaviours of school children, assessment of children's attitudes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to show the evaluation of food hygiene knowledge and self‐reported behaviours of school children, assessment of children's attitudes towards food hygiene and evaluation of barriers to the adoption of appropriate food hygiene behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The food hygiene knowledge and self‐reported behaviours of pupils (4 and 14 years; Key Stages 1‐3 in the English system – or Scottish equivalent) were determined using age‐appropriate knowledge quizzes completed by 2,259 pupils across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. Attitudes towards food hygiene and barriers to performing desirable hygiene‐related behaviours were established through semi‐structured interviews with 82 pupils who completed knowledge tasks in South East England.

Findings

Children generally had good knowledge of food hygiene. However, there were misconceptions about the nature of micro‐organisms and how they affect food. In addition, a lack of reminders and practical food activities, especially at Key Stage 2 (7‐11 years), coupled with poor hand‐washing facilities, meant that children did not always adopt desirable behaviours. Children gave suggestions for ways to help others to remember good practice.

Originality/value

The study identified areas of weakness in pupils' hygiene knowledge and understanding and has determined barriers to adoption of desirable behaviours at all times. It has also suggested ways in which food hygiene education could be made more engaging for pupils, and other methods to encourage good practice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Denise M. Rennie

Education of food industry personnel in hygiene matters has beenrecommended as a means of improving food handling practices and thus thesafety of food. Provision has been…

Abstract

Education of food industry personnel in hygiene matters has been recommended as a means of improving food handling practices and thus the safety of food. Provision has been made within the Food Safety Act 1990 for the making of regulations to specify the nature and extent of such training. There is, however, a lack of documentary evidence of improvements in food hygiene standards which can be directly related to education or training. Evaluations of formal food hygiene education courses have identified increased knowledge levels of course participants, and improvements in the relationship between food industry and enforcement personnel by the development of common understanding. Reported evaluations of food hygiene training programmes indicate that formal courses operated in settings divorced from the food handling environment are limited in effectiveness. While course participants have increased knowledge, evidence of consequential improved food handling behaviour is not clearly demonstrated. Training programmes more closely associated with the work site are potentially more effective especially if supported by practical reinforcement of hygiene messages.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Alison Reid, Dawn Wood and David Kinney

The issues of microbial food poisoning are never far from the headlines. Of particular concern is the emergence of strains of increased virulence, for example Escherichia

Abstract

The issues of microbial food poisoning are never far from the headlines. Of particular concern is the emergence of strains of increased virulence, for example Escherichia coli 0157. As we are likely to be faced with a succession of food hygiene challenges in our kitchens, do consumers have access to the information they need and is it presented in such a way that it encourages and motivates towards good food handling and food hygiene practices? This paper concentrates on a range of food hygiene information provided by the Government, the Health Education Authority and the media. The information is examined with respect to availability, content and context. Observations are made from sociological, scientific and visual communications perspectives.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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