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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Steve Macaulay and Sarah Cook

Explores the role of reward and recognition schemes in motivating groups and individuals to keep their energies focused on the customer. Examines the practical steps…

Abstract

Explores the role of reward and recognition schemes in motivating groups and individuals to keep their energies focused on the customer. Examines the practical steps necessary to introduce and maintain successful initiatives, both financial and non‐financial. These steps involve taking time to clarify the aims of the scheme and ensuring there is a good “fit” through taking full account of the organisational and customer context. Stresses the need to measure the right things and emphasises the importance of buy in through involvement of employees and customers, plus linking rewards to customer satisfaction and taking account of the needs of internal customers. Concludes with a checklist to enable readers to assess their reward and recognition processes and pinpoint areas which need attention in order to give more customer focus. Short company examples are given throughout to illustrate key points.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Sarah Cook and Steve Macaulay

Discusses the characteristics of an empowered organization and what has led to the increasing popularity of empowerment. Asks whether it is simply empty management…

Abstract

Discusses the characteristics of an empowered organization and what has led to the increasing popularity of empowerment. Asks whether it is simply empty management rhetoric or a practical tool for change. Describes the benefits to the customer from this approach and what empowerment means to the employee. Concludes that to be successful, empowerment needs to take place in a supportive framework, with management buy‐in at all levels and help being given to managers so they become coaches and facilitators. Also training alone is not sufficient but may need other tools, such as team building, creating one right culture and reward and recognition programmes.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09684879610112800. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09684879610112800. When citing the article, please cite: Sarah Cook, Steve Macaulay, (1996), “Empowered customer service”, Training for Quality, Vol. 4 Iss: 1, pp. 7 - 11.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Benedetta Cappellini and Elizabeth Parsons

Purpose – In this chapter, we seek to explore the collective responsibilities undertaken by the family as a whole in maintaining familial bonds through meal consumption…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, we seek to explore the collective responsibilities undertaken by the family as a whole in maintaining familial bonds through meal consumption. We draw on work which examines the role of gift giving (Ruskola, 2005), sharing (Belk, 2010) and sacrifice (Miller, 1998) in consumption. We take an original approach which does not look at the family meal in isolation but rather focuses on the patterning of meals and the relationships between them.

Methodology – The ethnographic study draws on interviews with 18 families and follows up mealtime observations with 15 families.

Findings – The analysis reveals a mealtime patterning involving collective participation in saving (in the form of consuming ordinary and thrifty meals during the week) and spending (in consuming extraordinary meals at weekends). Even if in the women and mothers in the household tend to sacrifice themselves more than other family members, the consumption of thrifty or ordinary meals implies a process of sacrifice involving the entire family. In viewing the meal as gift, we also observe a process of reciprocity in operation with family members obliged to both share in, and contribute to, the meals that have been cooked for them.

Social implication – Our analysis reveals discordances between the aspirations of family members (which are arguably largely based on cultural ideals), and their everyday experiences of family mealtimes.

Originality/Value – The chapter show how these micro experiences of family mealtimes have implications for a macro understanding of the idealised and culturally loaded construct of the family meal.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Eileen McNamara and Ian Hall

There are several proposed changes to the law in England and Wales that will particularly affect women with learning disabilities. The Sexual Offences Act 2003, the draft…

Abstract

There are several proposed changes to the law in England and Wales that will particularly affect women with learning disabilities. The Sexual Offences Act 2003, the draft Mental Health Bill and the draft Mental Incapacity Bill all highlight the tension between state paternalism and individual autonomy. This paper uses a fictional case scenario in order to consider the practical implications of this proposed legislation, and dilemmas that may arise.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Sarah Cook

Outlines a basic definition of empowerment and the benefits itbrings to the organization. Written in a practical manner, can be usedto explain the principles of…

Abstract

Outlines a basic definition of empowerment and the benefits it brings to the organization. Written in a practical manner, can be used to explain the principles of empowerment to those unfamiliar with the concept.

Details

Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Terri Feldman Barr

Abstract

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Andy Gatley

The purpose of this paper is to explore the routine, everyday experiences and attitudes people bring to cooking and eating and aims to compare the significance of such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the routine, everyday experiences and attitudes people bring to cooking and eating and aims to compare the significance of such culinary cultures to diets in France and Britain.

Design/methodology/approach

The initial phase of this qualitative, comparative research involved in-depth interviews with 13 French and 14 British citizens who were each asked to reflect upon foods eaten in the home, preparation methods and issues surrounding dietary practices and culinary cultures. The next phase of the research asked “experts” working within the field to reflect and elaborate upon the initial findings and in total ten French and nine British “experts” were interviewed.

Findings

The results reveal how to a greater extent French respondents relied upon raw ingredients from which they more regularly prepared “traditional”, structured and commensal meal occasions. Such a food model remains a significant part of everyday life and culinary cultures in France support the consumption of a relatively healthy diet unlike in Britain.

Research limitations/implications

This is a small exploratory study based on a limited number of respondents. Further research would benefit from observing what people actually do rather than relying on what people say they do.

Practical implications

Those responsible for promoting healthier diets need to further prioritise the significance of culinary cultures to cooking practices and diet.

Originality/value

While the influence of domestic cooking practices on food intake has received some scholarly attention, this paper presents a more holistic insight into how culinary cultures can play a significant mediating role on diets more generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Steve Macaulay and Sarah Cook

Discusses a recent Industrial Society survey which indicated thatcustomer care and service was a priority for UK organizations. Showsthat “the customer is always right”…

Abstract

Discusses a recent Industrial Society survey which indicated that customer care and service was a priority for UK organizations. Shows that “the customer is always right” needs an effective customer service initiative to be able to address this and more.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Steve Macaulay and Sarah Cook

Examines the focus on customer service while at the same time maximizing the use of resources. Suggests that through effective management of resources a balance between…

Abstract

Examines the focus on customer service while at the same time maximizing the use of resources. Suggests that through effective management of resources a balance between the cost and quality of human resources can be achieved. Maintains that customer service is the key to success for an organization, and offers seven suggestions for managing a “superior” service. Concludes that successful customer‐focused organizations: do what they say; make what matters to the customer their priority; find ways to improve; make positive personal contact with the customer; and have well‐trained and motivated staff who work well together.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

Keywords

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