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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Mark M. Davis and Janelle Heineke

The experience of waiting for service is often the first direct interaction between customers and most service delivery processes. The literature on satisfaction with…

Abstract

The experience of waiting for service is often the first direct interaction between customers and most service delivery processes. The literature on satisfaction with waiting has paralleled the literature on general service satisfaction, in which the relative importance of actual performance, perceived performance, and the disconfirmation between expected performance and perceived performance has been the subject of much debate. This paper presents an empirical study of satisfaction with waiting for service in a fast food environment. The study demonstrates that actual waiting time, perceived waiting time, and the disconfirmation between expected waiting time and perceived waiting time are all related to satisfaction with the waiting experience. It further demonstrates that the relative importance of each of these variables in predicting satisfaction depends on the differences in the needs of the customers. The implications for both theory and practice are significant: the importance of the perception of the experience increases as the importance of the satisfaction measure increases. More specifically, for customers who are concerned about time, the perception of the time spent waiting is a better predictor of satisfaction than the actual waiting time.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Marta Pedraja Iglesias and M. Jesus Yagüe Guillén

The intensely competitive environment existing in the restaurant sector makes it vital that firms achieve customer satisfaction in order to survive in the long term…

Abstract

The intensely competitive environment existing in the restaurant sector makes it vital that firms achieve customer satisfaction in order to survive in the long term. Obtaining customer satisfaction means that customers repeat the experienced service and that they become an effective and efficient communication resource, at no cost to the firm. Prominent among the antecedents that determine the level of customer satisfaction are perceived quality and total perceived price. The research carried out shows that perceived quality has a direct and positive impact on the level of customer satisfaction, while, contrary to what was expected, total perceived price does not influence that satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Choon Seong Leem and YongKi Yoon

The importance of software has been growing rapidly owing to the development of various Internet and e‐business applications. One of the active research areas in software…

Abstract

The importance of software has been growing rapidly owing to the development of various Internet and e‐business applications. One of the active research areas in software involves its evaluation methods or models. The traditional approaches to software evaluation are based on the development process point of view, and their major concerns are not strongly related to user or customer‐oriented evaluation of software. In this paper, a maturity model and a corresponding evaluation system are suggested that focuses on software customer satisfaction. As a case study, they are applied to 18 software companies and their 180 customers in Korea to prove their practical values.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 104 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ronald J. Burke, James Graham and Frank J. Smith

Two studies examined the relationship between employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction in two service organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

Two studies examined the relationship between employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction in two service organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction data were gathered separately and aggregated to branch or store level measures.

Findings

The data indicated generally positive and statistically significant relationships between employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction. Customers reported greater service satisfaction with branches or stores whose employees indicated higher levels of work and employees' satisfaction.

Originality/value

Implications for the delivery of high quality customer service are offered.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Scott M. Broetzmann, John Kemp, Mathieu Rossano and Jay Marwaha

Customer satisfaction managers tend to be more concerned withsimply measuring customer satisfaction than actually using the resultinginformation to build a business case…

Abstract

Customer satisfaction managers tend to be more concerned with simply measuring customer satisfaction than actually using the resulting information to build a business case for the improvement of service quality. Presents a simple methodology that any organization can use to move from measuring customer satisfaction to managing service quality using a four‐step procedure based on research; market damage assessment; action plan formulation; and policy implementation.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2010

Tianxiang Sheng and Chunlin Liu

Over the past few years, e‐commerce has become increasingly popular in China. Recent research has shown that it is widely accepted that customer satisfaction and loyalty…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past few years, e‐commerce has become increasingly popular in China. Recent research has shown that it is widely accepted that customer satisfaction and loyalty for online purchases is lower than that for shopping in more traditional ways. How to maintain and increase the satisfaction and loyalty of online customers is a challenging issue for online retailers. The purpose of this paper is to try to understand what affects customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A new conceptual model of customer satisfaction and loyalty in online purchases is developed, where four dimensions of e‐service quality – efficiency, requirement fulfillment, system accessibility, and privacy – are the four predictors from Parasuraman's E‐S‐QUAL. A partial least square estimation algorithm was then applied to analyze data from a sample of 164 online buyers from a range of backgrounds. Goods purchased include furniture, books, clothes, software, and digital products.

Findings

The results indicate that efficiency and fulfillment have positive effects on customer satisfaction, and fulfillment and privacy have positive effects on customer loyalty. However, the remaining factors have no significant effect on either customer satisfaction or customer loyalty. In addition, customer loyalty is positively affected by customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper finds that the service quality must be analyzed from different aspects only to find that the requirement fulfillment has relatively great effect on customers' satisfaction and loyalty, the system accessibility has no effect on both, the efficiency has positive effect on customers' satisfaction and the privacy has positive effect on customers' loyalty. As these results are inconsistent with previous research achievements to some extent, this paper tends to provide some explanation.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Ingrid Fečiková

Customer satisfaction (CS) has become an important issue for commercial and public service organisations. Companies win or lose based on what percentage of their customers

Abstract

Customer satisfaction (CS) has become an important issue for commercial and public service organisations. Companies win or lose based on what percentage of their customers they can keep. Success is largely about retention of customers, which again depends on CS level. It would be a great help to be able to comprehensively measure the quality of product and service, by relating the measures of quality to real customer behaviour. Some companies get feedback about CS through the percentage of complaints, some through non‐systematic surveys, again some do not measure CS at all, because “the system would not add anything useful and is very time‐consuming”. Give three managers in the same company the same objective: to improve CS, however it may be measured, and they will come up with three distinctly different and incompatible plans. CS requires a number of ingredients, all of which need to be considered. Aims to develop and simplify measurement systems by using a general formula that makes quantitative measurement of CS possible. Considers four important aspects that have a negative or positive influence on profitability related to CS.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Li‐Wei Mai and Mitchell R. Ness

Analyses customer satisfaction with mail‐order speciality foods in the UK and examines the relationship between satisfaction with eight attributes of mail‐order speciality…

Abstract

Analyses customer satisfaction with mail‐order speciality foods in the UK and examines the relationship between satisfaction with eight attributes of mail‐order speciality food and their association with overall satisfaction and likelihood of future purchase. Univariate analysis reveals that a high proportion of mail‐order customers experience satisfaction with each of the eight mail‐order attributes, reflected in a high proportion of customers who are satisfied overall and who intend to repurchase the products in the future. Canonical correlation analysis reveals a statistically significant relationship between one set of variables, overall satisfaction and likelihood of future purchase, and another set of variables, the eight mail‐order attributes. Consequently the results indicate that customer satisfaction is associated with service aspects of mail‐order such as the order process and delivery service as well as physical product attributes such as product quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Timothy L. Keiningham, Tiffany Perkins‐Munn, Lerzan Aksoy and Demitry Estrin

Many researches have proposed a virtuous chain of effects from improved customer satisfaction to profits. In particular, satisfaction is thought to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

Many researches have proposed a virtuous chain of effects from improved customer satisfaction to profits. In particular, satisfaction is thought to improve share‐of‐spending, which in turn leads to higher customer revenue and customer profitability. This paper aims to examine these proposed linkages using data from the institutional securities industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in the analyses were collected as part of an ongoing telephone satisfaction survey of 81 clients of an institutional securities firm across two continents (North America and Europe). Mediation analysis was used to test the hypothesized effects.

Findings

Customer revenue was found to correlate negatively with customer profitability for unprofitable customers, and positively for profitable customers.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this research is that it tests the propositions within a single industry. Future research should attempt to replicate these findings in other contexts.

Practical implications

A simplistic focus on improving customer satisfaction for all customers in order to improve share‐of‐wallet and customer revenue does not seem to represent the best management approach to maximize overall firm profitability. In fact, it could actually result in a negative return on investment. Therefore, customers should first be segmented by their profitability to the firm before expending resources to improve customer satisfaction and share‐of‐wallet.

Originality/value

The results of this paper challenge the conventional belief that customer satisfaction should lead to customer retention in turn, resulting in customer revenue and ultimately customer profitability. The findings indicate that this may not always be true.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

X.X. Shen, K.C. Tan and M. Xie

Through listening to the voice of the customer, quality function deployment (QFD) is a systematic methodology for quality improvement and product development. The quality…

Abstract

Through listening to the voice of the customer, quality function deployment (QFD) is a systematic methodology for quality improvement and product development. The quality of a product or service is ultimately judged in terms of customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction benchmarking can help decision makers identify areas for improvement, make strategic decisions, and set targets on desired satisfaction performance. The main purpose of this paper is to study procedures and methods for successful benchmarking in QFD for quality improvement. It discussed the customer satisfaction benchmarking process in QFD and proposed the use of hierarchical benchmarks for strategic competitor selection and decision making. A case study was presented to illustrate the use of this method. This paper may provide a road map to achieve world‐class performance through benchmarking in QFD, especially for small to medium‐sized enterprises or companies in developing countries.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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