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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Ghada El-Kot, Ronald J. Burke and Lisa M. Fiksenbaum

This paper aims to examine the relationship of perceived supervisor empowerment behaviors and feelings of personal empowerment with important work and well-being outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship of perceived supervisor empowerment behaviors and feelings of personal empowerment with important work and well-being outcomes in a sample of Egyptian women managers and professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 155 managerial and professional women using anonymously completed questionnaires. Respondents were relatively young; had university educations; had the short job and organizational tenures; held various levels of management jobs; and worked in a range of functions. All measures used here had been used and validated previously by other researchers.

Findings

Work outcomes included job satisfaction, career satisfaction, work engagement, work-family and family-work conflict, emotional exhaustion/burnout, life satisfaction and intent to quit. Both perceived levels of supervisory/leader empowerment behaviors and self-reported feelings of empowerment had significant relationships with the majority of work and well-being outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected using self-report questionnaires with the small risk of response set and common method biases. Second, all data were collected at one point in time making it challenging to address issues of causality. Third, all respondents came from the two largest cities in Egypt, Cairo and Alexandria; thus, the extent to which our findings would generalize to managerial and professional women and men is indeterminate. Fourth, it was not possible to determine the representativeness of our sample as well.

Practical implications

Practical implications of these findings along with future research directions are offered. Practical applications include training supervisors on empowerment behaviors, and training all employees on the benefits of personal empowerment and efficacy and ways to increase them.

Social implications

A number of ways to increase levels of empowerment of both front-line employees and managers have been identified. These include increasing employee participation in decision-making, delegating authority and control to these employees, creating more challenging work roles through job redesign, leaders sharing more information and leaders providing more coaching and mentoring to their staff. At the micro level, increasing levels of employee self-efficacy through training and more effective use of their work experiences will increase personal empowerment and improve work outcomes.

Originality/value

Relatively little research has been undertaken on women in management and human resource management in Egypt.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Ronald J. Burke, Stig Berge Matthiesen and Stale Pallesen

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of individual difference personality characteristics (Big Five, generalized self‐efficacy), workaholism components…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of individual difference personality characteristics (Big Five, generalized self‐efficacy), workaholism components and work life factors on measures of job satisfaction, burnout and health complaints.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 496 nursing staff caring for terminally ill patients in five health care facilities in Norway using questionnaires.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for personal demographic and work setting characteristics, indicated strong relationships of particular Big Five personality factors, workaholism components and work life factors with both job satisfaction and burnout; health complaints were only predicted by personality factors.

Practical implications

Future research must examine the generalizability of these findings to other samples in different countries. Implications for management and organizations are offered.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of personality factors to workaholics in work outcomes and well‐being.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Ronald Burke

This study examined the relationship of managerial and professional men’s perception of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance in their workplace and…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of managerial and professional men’s perception of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance in their workplace and their work experiences, indicators of work and life satisfaction and psychological wellbeing. Data were collected from 283 men using anonymous questionnaires. Managerial men reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported working fewer hours and extra hours, less job stress, greater joy in work, lower intentions to quit, greater job career and life satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional and physical wellbeing.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Ronald J. Burke

This paper aims to raise some important questions for cross‐cultural research on occupational stress and well‐being and sets the stage for the five papers in the special issue.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to raise some important questions for cross‐cultural research on occupational stress and well‐being and sets the stage for the five papers in the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews some previous literature on cross‐cultural understanding of occupational stress and well‐being, why such research is difficult to undertake, and summarizes the five original manuscripts that comprise this special issue.

Findings

Manuscripts in this special issue represent authors from several countries and report data collected from over a dozen countries. Some contributions attempt to replicate previous North American and European research findings in other countries while others undertake comparative studies of two or more countries.

Originality/value

It is important to undertake more cross‐cultural comparative research of the effects of occupational stress and well‐being to determine whether any boundary conditions exist for previous results based in North American and European samples. In addition, future research should include assessments of some national culture values.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Ronald J. Burke, Louie A. Divinagracia and Ermias Mamo

This study examined the use of a variety of career strategies by 200 Filipino managerial women. Data were collected using anonymously completed questionnaires. These women…

Abstract

This study examined the use of a variety of career strategies by 200 Filipino managerial women. Data were collected using anonymously completed questionnaires. These women made considerable use of career strategies making greater use of those internal to those external to the organization. Managerial women using more career strategies worked more extra hours per week and participated in a greater number of training and development activities. In addition, these women were more satisfied with their careers and reported more optimistic career prospects.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Ronald J. Burke and Parbudyal Singh

This study explored the relationship of measures of career priority and family priority with a number of other variables including personal demographics, work situation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the relationship of measures of career priority and family priority with a number of other variables including personal demographics, work situation characteristics, work motivations, work outcomes and indicators of extra-work outcomes such as affluence and psychological well-being. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 290 nursing staff, the vast majority female, working in Ontario, Canada, using anonymously completed questionnaires.

Findings

Career priority and family priority were significantly and positively correlated in this sample. Nursing staff also rated family priority significantly higher than career priority. Personal demographics were associated with levels of both career priority and family priority such that married nursing staff, nursing staff with children, and nursing staff working part time reported lower levels of career priority, while married nurses and nursing staff having children rated family priority higher. Nursing staff having higher levels of work motivation also rated career priority higher. Career priority was significantly correlated with several work outcomes. Nursing staff indicating a higher career priority were more satisfied and engaged in their jobs. Somewhat surprisingly, family priority was generally unrelated to these work and well-being outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Recent writing on women in organizations has raised the question of can women “have it all”, a successful and demanding career and a satisfying home and family life. The findings contribute to this debate.

Practical implications

Suggestions for both women and organizations to facilitate career and family facilitation are offered.

Social implications

Increasing interest has been shown in women in the workplace, and whether they should “lean in” to advance their careers. The authors suggest that this strategy may be at odds with what women, and men, increasingly want.

Originality/value

The paper highlights differences in the antecedents and consequences of career priority and family priority in a predominately female sample bringing work and family issues into the forefront once again.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Janet A. Boekhorst, Parbudyal Singh and Ronald Burke

The purpose of this paper is to examine a moderated mediation model that investigated the moderating role of psychological detachment in the relationship between work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a moderated mediation model that investigated the moderating role of psychological detachment in the relationship between work intensity and life satisfaction via emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 149 hospital-based nurses who completed a questionnaire about working conditions and individual outcomes. The data were analyzed using hierarchical moderated regression and bootstrapping techniques.

Findings

The results confirm that work intensity is negatively related to life satisfaction via emotional exhaustion. The results also demonstrate that psychological detachment diminishes the negative influence of emotional exhaustion on life satisfaction. The conditional indirect effect model shows that the indirect relationship between work intensity and life satisfaction is strongest at low psychological detachment.

Research limitations/implications

This research advances our understanding of the negative work and non-work implications associated with work intensity. The key limitation of this research was the cross-sectional data set. HRM researchers should seek to replicate and expand the results with multi-wave data to extend our understanding of the implications of work intensity.

Practical implications

HRM practitioners need to begin implementing measures to address work intensity in order to thwart its negative effects. HRM practitioners need to implement policies and procedures that limit the intensity of work demands to promote positive employee work and non-work outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first study to show that work intensity can influence life satisfaction through emotional exhaustion. Contrary to most recovery research, this research is also among the first to focus on the moderating role of psychological detachment, especially within a conditional indirect effect model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Ronald J. Burke

This study examines the relationship of gender proportions and a variety of work experiences, work and extra‐work satisfactions and indicators of psychological wellbeing…

Abstract

This study examines the relationship of gender proportions and a variety of work experiences, work and extra‐work satisfactions and indicators of psychological wellbeing among 324 female and 134 male psychologists. Data were collected using questionnaires completed anonymously. Female psychologists indicated a higher proportion of females in their workplaces than did male psychologists. Both female and male psychologists indicated more women at lower than at higher organizational levels. Male psychologists were older, had longer job and employer tenure, were at higher organizational levels, earned more income and were more likely to be married. Measures of gender proportions were generally uncorrelated with work experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions and psychological wellbeing among both female and male psychologists.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Ronald J. Burke

This study examined the relationship of managerial and professional women’s and men’s perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of managerial and professional women’s and men’s perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their job experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions and psychological wellbeing. Managerial women reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported greater job and career satisfaction, less work stress, less intention to quit, greater family satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional wellbeing. Managerial men reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported working fewer hours and extra hours, less job stress, greater joy in work, lower intentions to quit, greater job, career and life satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional and physical well‐being. Multiple regression analyses indicated more independent and significant correlates of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance among men than among women. Possible explanations for why men might benefit more from such organizational values are offered.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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