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1 – 10 of 13
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Richard M. Castaldi, Murray Silverman and Sanjit Sengupta

In the Spring of 2000, questionnaires regarding the export assistance needs of all 1012 wineries in California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho were mailed. These surveys, one for…

Abstract

In the Spring of 2000, questionnaires regarding the export assistance needs of all 1012 wineries in California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho were mailed. These surveys, one for current exporters and one for non‐exporters, were based upon over 25 in‐depth interviews with wine industry executives as well as public, industry and private sector export service providers. Each questionnaire included a section specifically designed to identify and prioritize the assistance needs of exporting and non‐exporting wineries. The 24% return rate enhances the validity of the survey results. The purpose of this research effort is to provide export service intermediaries with an empirical model of the exporting needs of wineries so they can improve the effectiveness of their export assistance programs to enhance the global competitiveness of US wineries. Results suggest that managers in exporting wineries see great value in “advanced” export assistance needs. Managers of non‐exporting wineries place the highest value on more “fundamental” export assistance. Non‐exporters and new exporters place higher value on assistance in finding distributors than experienced exporters. Lastly, venues in which there is an opportunity to network with experienced exporters is seen as a valuable assistance tool by both exporting and non‐exporting wineries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Richard M. Castaldi, Alex F. De Noble and Jeffrey Kantor

Reports a survey of 352 Canadian exporters regarding their use ofintermediaries in exporting endeavours. Contrasts results with resultsobtained from other studies involving 394…

Abstract

Reports a survey of 352 Canadian exporters regarding their use of intermediaries in exporting endeavours. Contrasts results with results obtained from other studies involving 394 American exporters. Tests hypotheses regarding the effect of product type, export sales volume and national exporting infrastructure differences on the various export services performed. Prior studies of American intermediaries showed a near inverse relationship between the perceived importance of specific export services and the intermediaries′ level of performance of these services. Canadian exporters, however, feel that their intermediaries are meeting their exporting needs much more effectively.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Richard M. Castaldi, Murray Silverman and Sanjit Sengupta

In the Spring of 2000, questionnaires regarding the export assistance needs of all 1012 wineries in California. Oregon Washington and Idaho were mailed. These surveys one for…

Abstract

In the Spring of 2000, questionnaires regarding the export assistance needs of all 1012 wineries in California. Oregon Washington and Idaho were mailed. These surveys one for current exporters and one for non‐exporters were based upon over 25 in‐depth interviews with wine industry executives and export service providers. Each questionnaire included a section specifically designed to identify and prioritise the assistance needs of exporters and non‐exporters. The robust 24% return rate enhances the validity of the survey results. Among current exporters information regarding competitors, consumers and distributors specific export markets represent five of the six most highly valued assistance needs. Assistance in finding distributors and agents are especially important to inexperienced exporters and those dissatisfied with their current export programme. Non‐exporters place priority on training and assistance in understanding the fundamentals of developing a successful winery export programme. Finally, both exporters and non‐exporters give high priority to learning about the export experiences of other wineries which they feel will help improve their own international trade endeavours.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Mahmood Hussain, Susan Cholette and Richard Castaldi

The purpose of this paper is to identify econometrically the determinants of wine consumption of US consumers.

3033

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify econometrically the determinants of wine consumption of US consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In empirically identifying driving forces of wine consumption, we used 122 survey responses from Northern California consumers.

Findings

The study found that even knowledgeable or frequent consumers of wine purchase across all price points. Further, a significant positive correlation exists between knowledge and volume of wine consumed. All three regression techniques applied in this paper indicate that knowledge remains the most important determinant in wine consumption.

Practical implications

The results emphasize the need for US wineries to better educate and connect with consumers by developing compatible positioning strategies and marketing programs that are as informative as they are appealing.

Originality/value

As one of the few studies of the US wine market employing econometric analysis, this paper offers a fresh perspective on the consumption behavior of wine drinkers in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 September 2023

Veronica Moretti

Abstract

Details

Understanding Comics-Based Research: A Practical Guide for Social Scientists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-462-3

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Cynthia L. Uline, Megan Tschannen‐Moran and Thomas DeVere Wolsey

Accompanying the recent concern for the quality of our nation's educational infrastructure, a growing body of research connects the quality of school facilities to both student…

1971

Abstract

Purpose

Accompanying the recent concern for the quality of our nation's educational infrastructure, a growing body of research connects the quality of school facilities to both student outcomes including achievement, behavior, and attitude as well as to teacher attitude and behavior. Less is known about the mechanisms of these relationships. This paper aims to examine the link between school building quality and student outcomes through the mediating influence of school climate. Results build upon those of a recent study that confirmed a link between the quality of school facilities and student achievement in both English and Mathematics, as well as the mediating role of school climate. This qualitative follow‐up study explores the complicated intricacies of how a school building's physical properties influence teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is structured according to a collective, instrumental case study design. Individual, focus group, walk‐through and photo‐interviews, as well as observations inform the inquiry. Two high‐poverty schools are identified from the earlier quantitative study because the ratings of the quality school facilities by their faculties fall within the upper quartile. These two schools, one urban and one rural, are selected purposefully for this study, maximizing learning from cases rich in information.

Findings

Results of the research indicate that ongoing interactions between the original design, the day‐to‐day reality of the built environment, and the occupants of that environment help to define the learning climate of these schools. Reciprocally, the climate helps to shape the interactions that take place, fostering environmental understanding, competence and control and supporting academic learning. From the data, several broad themes related to building quality emerge as central to this interaction between the built environment and building occupants, including movement, aesthetics, play of light, flexible and responsive classrooms, elbow room, and security.

Originality/value

Through the stories told by occupants of these two schools, we gain further understanding of the interactions between certain building conditions and design features and how these reinforce and enhance the social environment of school, helping to foster a sense of belonging within a place, a sense of control and competence, and a sense of collective commitment to the place and its purposes. As school designers balance considerations of durability with flexibility, the voices of these occupants may serve to argue for the inclusion of design features that allow occupants some measure of control over comfort and use factors. The broad themes related to building quality that emerge from the data include movement, aesthetics, the play of light, flexible and responsive classrooms, elbow room, as well as safety and security.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Britta Søgaard, Heather Dawn Skipworth, Michael Bourlakis, Carlos Mena and Richard Wilding

This paper aims to explore how purchasing could respond to disruptive technologies by examining the assumptions underlying purchasing strategic alignment and purchasing maturity…

1305

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how purchasing could respond to disruptive technologies by examining the assumptions underlying purchasing strategic alignment and purchasing maturity through a contingency lens.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a systematic review across purchasing maturity and purchasing strategic alignment literature. This is supplemented with exploratory case studies to include practitioners’ views.

Findings

This research demonstrates that neither purchasing maturity nor purchasing strategic alignment are suitable approaches to respond to disruptive technologies. Purchasing maturity does not allow purchasing managers to select relevant practices. It also shows no consideration of any contingencies, which practitioners highlight as important for the selection of practices. Purchasing strategic alignment includes the company strategy as a contingency but does not provide any practices to choose from. It does not include any other contextual contingencies considered important by practitioners. The findings indicate that linking the two research streams may provide a more suitable approach to responding to disruptive technologies.

Research limitations/implications

This research demonstrates the requirement to develop a new approach to responding to disruptive technologies, by linking purchasing maturity and purchasing strategic alignment to contextual contingencies. This is a currently unexplored approach in academic literature, which refutes the generally accepted premise that higher maturity unilaterally supports a better positioning towards technological disruption. This research also highlights a requirement for practitioners to shift their approach to “best practices”.

Originality/value

This is the first research to systematically review the relationships between purchasing maturity and purchasing strategic alignment. It adds to contingency theory by suggesting that purchasing maturity models can support the achievement of strategic alignment. Also, future research directions are suggested to explore these relationships.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Ulrich R. Orth, Larry Lockshin and Francois d'Hauteville

This paper has the purpose of introducing the inaugural issue of the International Journal of Wine Business Research after the re‐launch from the International Journal of Wine

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper has the purpose of introducing the inaugural issue of the International Journal of Wine Business Research after the re‐launch from the International Journal of Wine Marketing including rationale, scope, goals, and objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a rationale for a journal such as IJWBR. It starts by outlining the global wine business as a complex and fruitful field to study, describes some streams of research, and identifies issues for future studies as potential further contributions to this journal.

Findings

There is a critical need for an outlet that provides an overview on current issues and topics in the wine business, promotes high quality research on all aspects related to managing wine and related businesses, and is accessible to both academics and the global wine trade.

Originality/value

This paper is essential for current and prospective readers of the journal and those who consider submitting to IJWBR.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Joseph Amankwah-Amoah, Richard B. Nyuur, Robert Hinson, John Paul Kosiba, Omar Al-Tabbaa and James A. Cunningham

Although start-ups have gained increasing scholarly attention, we lack sufficient understanding of their entrepreneurial strategic posture (ESP) in emerging economies. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Although start-ups have gained increasing scholarly attention, we lack sufficient understanding of their entrepreneurial strategic posture (ESP) in emerging economies. The purpose of this study is to examine the processes of ESP of new technology venture start-ups (NTVs) in an emerging market context.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with grounded theory guidelines and the inductive research traditions, the authors adopted a qualitative approach involving 42 in-depth semi-structured interviews with Ghanaian NTV entrepreneurs to gain a comprehensive analysis at the micro-level on the entrepreneurs' strategic posturing. A systematic procedure for data analysis was adopted.

Findings

From the authors' analysis of Ghanaian NTVs, the authors derived a three-stage model to elucidate the nature and process of ESP Phase 1 spotting and exploiting market opportunities, Phase II identifying initial advantages and Phase III ascertaining and responding to change.

Originality/value

The study contributes to advancing research on ESP by explicating the process through which informal ties and networks are utilised by NTVs and NTVs' founders to overcome extreme resource constraints and information vacuums in contexts of institutional voids. The authors depart from past studies in demonstrating how such ties can be harnessed in spotting and exploiting market opportunities by NTVs. On this basis, the paper makes original contributions to ESP theory and practice.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Asta Pundziene, Shahrokh Nikou and Harry Bouwman

Prior research has reported the indirect implications of firm's dynamic capabilities on their competitive firm performance. Our attention now turns to open innovation since it has…

8811

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research has reported the indirect implications of firm's dynamic capabilities on their competitive firm performance. Our attention now turns to open innovation since it has been confirmed to be an influential factor contributing to the superior performance of technological firms. So far there has been little research on assessing the relationship between a firm's dynamic capabilities as an antecedent of the competitive performance of the firm or investigations into the mediating role of open innovation in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of dynamic capabilities, we developed a framework as a way to better understand the role of open innovation, which could then help to better explain the relationship between firms' dynamics capabilities and their competitive firm performance. Based on the empirical data of 465 firms operating in innovative and non-innovative industries, we employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine the research hypotheses and the path relationships in the proposed model.

Findings

The SEM analysis revealed that a firm's dynamic capabilities significantly impact its open innovation performance and that open innovation, consequently, impacts the competitive performance of the firm. Moreover, the results show that the path between dynamic capabilities and competitive firm performance is partially mediated through open innovation.

Practical implications

The findings provide practical implications and draw managerial attention to the importance of: (1) investing in innovation, (2) engaging customers in the innovation process and (3) maintaining innovation management excellence as significant antecedent factors in increasing competitive firm performance.

Originality/value

Considering the lack of empirical research in the literature on the links between dynamic capabilities and open innovation, this paper contributes to the dynamic capabilities and open innovation literature by confirming that open innovation not only mediates the relationship between these two aspects but also strengthens the effect the dynamic capabilities have on competitive firm performance. Besides, due to the significant impact of dynamic capabilities on open innovation, dynamic capabilities might be regarded as an antecedent of open innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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