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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

James M. Crick

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the theoretical and methodological value of studying coopetition (the interplay between cooperation and competition) in a wine

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the theoretical and methodological value of studying coopetition (the interplay between cooperation and competition) in a wine industry context.

Design/methodology/approach

Key publications surrounding wine industries across multiple countries were reviewed to understand how the wine industry is a highly appropriate empirical context to investigate coopetition.

Findings

The findings revealed that the wine industry is a highly suitable empirical context for researchers to explore coopetition. Specifically, being a highly cooperative and competitive market, the wine industry provides a unique outlook into how coopetition is managed.

Originality/value

This paper helps scholars to appreciate the theoretical and methodological benefits of using a wine industry context to evaluate coopetition. Hence, scholars should use the wine industry to obtain rich empirical data surrounding coopetition. The paper ends with a set of recommendations for future research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Marc Michaud, Eduardo Segarra and Tim Dodd

This study estimates the economic impacts of the Texas wine and wine grape industry on the Texas economy by marketing channel. Survey data from the state's vineyards and…

Abstract

This study estimates the economic impacts of the Texas wine and wine grape industry on the Texas economy by marketing channel. Survey data from the state's vineyards and wineries for 1996 is used to construct an input‐output model of the Texas economy and an industry impact framework using IMPLAN. Results show that the total core economic impacts of the Texas wine and wine grape industry were $85.8 million in output impacts, 1,157 jobs, $29.6 million in income impacts, and $46.6 million in total value added impacts in 1996. Much of these core economic impacts were attributable to the retail and restaurant marketing channels.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Rohan Jordan, Pietro Zidda and Larry Lockshin

The success of the Australian wine industry is well documented. However, there have been few comparative studies of the reasons for this success as compared to Australia's…

3783

Abstract

Purpose

The success of the Australian wine industry is well documented. However, there have been few comparative studies of the reasons for this success as compared to Australia's main competitors. Most of the anecdotal evidence and trade publications focus on “value for money” and fruit‐driven wines, without looking at how the Australian wine businesses operate. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the external environment in France and Australia as one of the drivers for Australian wine sector success.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with two French and two Australian wineries and a review of the literature led to a series of hypotheses about the role of market orientation, strategic orientation, innovative and entrepreneurial environment orientation, constraining legislation, industry infrastructure usage, industry plan support, and interorganizational collaboration as factors differentiating the two countries. An online survey of wineries in the two countries resulted in a sample of 82 French and 63 Australian responses. An analysis of variance revealed significant differences between Australian wineries as compared to the French.

Findings

Australian wineries rated themselves higher in market orientation, growth strategy, export proactiveness, perceived innovative environment, perceived entrepreneurial environment, more interorganizational collaboration, and less perceived constraining legislation.

Practical implications

These results not only provide some basis for Australia's success in wine exporting, but also add to the literature on the effect of the external environment on business performance.

Originality value

Wine exporting countries can use the results to help shape policy for creating a more conducive environment for exporting wine.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

C. Michael Hall, Brock Cambourne, Niki Macionis and Gary Johnson

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly…

1797

Abstract

Wine tourism is an area of growing interest because of its potential to contribute to regional development and employment at times of rural restructuring, particularly through the development of inter and intra industry networks. This paper provides a review of wine tourism, briefly discusses networks and their value, then analyses the development of wine tourism networks in Australia and New Zealand. The research indicates that although wine tourism network development is being actively encouraged, substantial difficulties exist because of the perception by many in the wine industry that they are not part of tourism. The paper concludes that while the development of new organisational structures to encourage wine tourism development are useful, they must be complimented by research on linkages, education of potential network members in order to close information gaps; and the development of network structures which maximise the overlap and linkages mat exists between the wine and tourism industries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

David Aylward and Michael Clements

To examines strategies that have locked the Australian wine industry into a price‐sensitive, commodity wine market. The paper seeks to explain the inherent weakness of…

1052

Abstract

Purpose

To examines strategies that have locked the Australian wine industry into a price‐sensitive, commodity wine market. The paper seeks to explain the inherent weakness of these strategies and their inability to address current challenges and opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses empirical research data gathered from 100 SME wine firms. These firms were selected using a stratified random sampling technique. Four states were covered – New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Western Australia – with all major wine regions in these states equally represented. There was careful sampling according to size, so that boutique, and small‐ and medium‐sized firms were represented. Non‐exporting firms were excluded. In each case either the CEO or the marketing manager was interviewed.

Findings

The findings confirm the paper's hypothesis, that increasingly the Australian wine industry has become risk‐averse and locked into paradigms and organizational frameworks that are disconnecting from users and their requirements. The findings concur that greater differentiation of place, product, supply chains, and markets is required if the industry is to operate effectively within a multi‐dimensional landscape and continue to attract sustainable returns.

Research limitations/implications

The paper was based largely upon user perceptions about current and future industry developments. It would be extremely valuable if future research could align these perceptions with performance data at industry and firm level to provide a more convincing map of R&D activity.

Practical implications

This paper has significant implications and policy advice for future industry organization. The most immediate and important of these is a strategy of emphasizing differentiated, regionally‐identified products that target higher price‐points in major markets. The industry has already indicated that it intends moving in this direction.

Originality/value

The original aspect of the paper is its organization ecology approach to the industry, in which national parameters are replaced by a perception of global operating landscapes. In this sense, users are not only participants, but also spectators and interpreters. The paper should be of value to researchers, policy‐makers and all industry stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Per Jenster and Yiting Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evolutionary view of the emerging wine industry in China.

7161

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evolutionary view of the emerging wine industry in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Research on industry evolution provides a background for the historical evolution of the Chinese wine industry. Case studies are used to illustrate the different strategies of the leading wine producers in China, and to identify the major concerns and challenges in the Chinese wine industry. Growth potentials and ongoing trends are supported with statistics from authoritative databases and Chinese wine industry associations.

Findings

The Chinese wine market is characterized by an increasing concentration where the top four domestic producers dominate with 50 per cent market share. The lack of a wine culture makes brand marketing crucial to business success. Limited international efforts have been made by Chinese wine producers, although one winery has embarked on capturing 50 per cent of the global ice‐wine industry.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a historical overview of the Chinese wine industry and its current situation, which could not elude generalization and simplification. Enormous regional diversity in China compels differentiated regional studies in terms of production, consumer behaviors and marketing strategies.

Practical implications

The historical evolution of the Chinese wine industry reveals different settings for wine business in China. The dominance of domestic wine companies and ignorance of foreign wine brands among the general public imply a tough setting for foreign wine makers and distributors to enter the market.

Originality/value

The paper provides some insight into the historical and ongoing development of the Chinese wine market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Aysu Ozay, Ayse Akyol and M.Omer Azabagaoglu

Large parts of Turkey enjoy the right climate for viticulture. Viniculture for table grapes is an important part of the national economy. However, compared to the…

Abstract

Large parts of Turkey enjoy the right climate for viticulture. Viniculture for table grapes is an important part of the national economy. However, compared to the worldwide wine industry the Turkish wine industry is underdeveloped. Following the worldwide trend of growth in the wine industry the Turkish wine industry has started also to flourish and gain momentum. This article proposes to study the Turkish wine sector, including its historical background, its current situation, and the problems it is facing.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Susan L. Golicic

The wine industry is the one that is tightly linked to sustainability as its processes both impact and are impacted by the environment, society and companies’ financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The wine industry is the one that is tightly linked to sustainability as its processes both impact and are impacted by the environment, society and companies’ financial well-being. However, data show that this may not be recognized in practice. Thus, this research paper aims to examine what has changed with respect to sustainability practices over the past 10–15 years in this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A development-based multi-method approach was used to examine the purpose. In Phase 1, a grounded theory study conducted between 2009 and 2015 from wine businesses in 12 different global regions brought to light a potential disconnect between theory and practice in the importance of sustainability. In Phase 2, a comprehensive literature review and analysis of updated online content from the Phase 1 companies was conducted to paint a picture of the progression of sustainability focus and its implementation in company processes.

Findings

Using legitimacy theory as a foundation, it was found that the choice to pursue sustainability in this industry generally begins with a focus on environmental practices followed by financial sustainability and more recently social sustainability. Producers are also starting to emphasize overall sustainability often encompassing all three dimensions. The industry has also progressed through “levels of sophistication” in the different major supply chain processes (supply, production and distribution) over the years with their environmental efforts.

Originality/value

A framework of sustainability growth in the industry through a matrix of process sophistication is developed from the data. The results offer implications for theory, practice and industry policy and informs the future trajectory of sustainability within global business.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Jacques-Olivier Pesme, Roger Sugden, Malida Mooken, Marcela Valania and Kim Buschert

Identity is often used in wine territory narratives but its meaning is rarely explored with industry actors. This paper aims to present the development and application of…

Abstract

Purpose

Identity is often used in wine territory narratives but its meaning is rarely explored with industry actors. This paper aims to present the development and application of a four-step iterative process for engaging an industry in a complex and deep reflection about its shared identity: understanding identity; identifying commonalities and differences; developing a shared narrative and sharing best practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have engaged with over 50 wineries between 2016 and 2018 on the identity of the British Columbia wine territory through workshops, interviews and other conversations. Complementary methods include documentary review and observations.

Findings

The work shows the applicability of the four-step process. Success depends on building relationships with and across the industry; creating independent, safe learning environments and facilitation by an independent party; allowing for feedback between the steps, continuous reflection and reiteration of steps and making the time for complexity.

Practical implications

The application of the process in British Columbia shows that success depends on building relationships with and across the industry; creating independent, safe learning environments and making the time for complexity.

Originality/value

The paper presents the application of a unique process for industry to explore the identity of a wine territory. It focuses on British Columbia, about which little has been written. Through the process, the industry can better understand identity, what it is, why it matters and how it impacts businesses. The paper’s insights can inspire researchers and industries in their thinking and practice about identity.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Jeremy Galbreath

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the extent to which women are advancing in the wine industry, and whether there are conditions which help facilitate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore the extent to which women are advancing in the wine industry, and whether there are conditions which help facilitate their advancement. There is a perception that women are making great strides in the wine industry. However, this perception is largely anecdotal.

Design/methodology/approach

All wineries in Australia are examined in each year for the years 2007 to 2013. By relying on a leading wine industry database, women in CEO, winemaker, viticulturist and marketing roles are examined.

Findings

With the exception of the marketing role, women are under-represented relative to predicted representation rates. Regarding regional differences, there is no consistent pattern with respect to where women representation in the roles is higher. The findings also suggest that where there is a woman CEO, women are more likely to be represented in winemaker, viticulturist and marketing roles.

Research limitations/implications

The study represents Australian wine regions and should not be taken as a general population sample. The representation rates of women in top roles in other wine firms around the world may vary, which could lead to results different than those found in this study.

Practical implications

For firms and policy makers interested in increasing the representation rates of women in the wine industry, the results of this study offer some insight into where current rates stand, and what might be underlying these representation rates. This is expected to facilitate debate around the means and mechanisms through which to increase the representation of women in the wine industry.

Originality/value

This is the first known large-scale study to examine the representation rates of women in top roles in the wine industry; therefore, it offers both new insights and avenues for future research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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