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Article

Rudolf H. Moos

The purpose of this paper is to review some research on the environmental characteristics of residential care settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review some research on the environmental characteristics of residential care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's approach is an integrative overview and formulation of a conceptual framework to understand and measure the key environmental domains of residential care programs.

Findings

The five major domains that comprise the characteristics of residential program are the institutional context, physical and architectural features, policies and services, aggregate resident and staff characteristics, and the social climate. The multiphasic environmental assessment procedure (MEAP), which systematically assesses these domains, shows that, for example, programs with better physical features tend to have better policy and program characteristics, more functionally able residents, more varied and experienced staff, and a more cohesive social climate.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework and assessment procedures can be used to provide useful information to help prospective residents and staff select appropriate residential care settings, to identify characteristics of settings most amenable to change, decide what changes would benefit residents and staff, and, by providing systematic feedback, help guide program improvement; and identify environmental features most closely associated with residents' quality of life and functional maintenance or improvement.

Originality/value

The paper presents a unique and innovative conceptualization of the environmental domains of residential care settings, along with a validated procedure to measure these domains.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 33 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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Article

Jan Nordoff and Iolo Madoc-Jones

Children who enter the care system in England and Wales are among some of the most vulnerable children in society, often presenting with high levels of need. Ensuring that…

Abstract

Purpose

Children who enter the care system in England and Wales are among some of the most vulnerable children in society, often presenting with high levels of need. Ensuring that the children's workforce has the skills and knowledge to meet the challenges of caring for this group of children has been at the forefront of policy agendas over the past two decades. This paper aims to report on an educational initiative to develop the capacity of residential childcare staff to work therapeutically with children.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the origins and nature of the Foundation Degree in Therapeutic Childcare and documents the reflections of tutors responsible for delivering the programme on their experiences. Comments from a small student sample are included to highlight the student perspective in studying for the Foundation Degree.

Findings

The paper concludes that while some barriers exist in delivering the Foundation Degree to residential child care workers, programmes designed to develop knowledge and understanding of working therapeutically with children should be promoted.

Originality/value

The paper highlights some of the issues and challenges associated with educating the children's workforce and reports back on one of the first Foundation Degrees in the UK focusing on residential and foster care workers.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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Article

Irene O'Connor

Southern Ireland faces similar challenges to the rest of Europe in that it has a rapidly increasing older population, seemingly infinite demand for health and social care…

Abstract

Southern Ireland faces similar challenges to the rest of Europe in that it has a rapidly increasing older population, seemingly infinite demand for health and social care and growing financial pressures. Against such a background, there are concerns about the quality of care provided for frail older people, especially in long‐term care settings. This paper considers some recent policy development in Ireland, with a particular focus on long‐term care. It describes the response to a series of inquiries about the quality of care in such environments and the subsequent formation of the Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA). HIQA has just introduced a series of new inspections standards, and these are presented in the article. However, whilst these standards are to be welcomed, it is argued that standards alone will not result in improved quality unless there is also a recognition of the role and value of long‐term care as a positive care environment for older people.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article

Jörgen Lundälv, Inga Malmqvist and Charlotta Thodelius

The purpose of this study is to find out what knowledge and experience of occupational therapists, personal assistants and public health nurses/nurses in Sweden can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to find out what knowledge and experience of occupational therapists, personal assistants and public health nurses/nurses in Sweden can contribute concerning the vulnerability of residents to injury in different residential care-settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an online survey. A total of 832 individuals responded to the survey. The data were analyzed from a mixed-method approach, using descriptive statistics, correlations and textual-analysis.

Findings

More than one in four representatives of these professions had witnessed accidents. The results show that bedrooms and bathrooms are the rooms in which accidents are most likely to occur in homes.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the study is that the impact of educational initiatives on the different professions was not investigated, so it is not possible to ascertain what effect this may have had on risk identification and accident prevention measures in residential care-settings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no prior study of these issues has been conducted. This study is deemed to have significant social benefit because of the steadily increasing need for care in residential settings. No other study has addressed the importance of the physical environment in this context. Collaborations involving researchers from various disciplines, professional organizations and public and private sector employers involved in personal assistance have contributed specific knowledge.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Modelling Our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-808-7

Abstract

Details

Designing Environments for People with Dementia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-974-8

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Article

Daniel Robert Stubbings, Kyle Hughes and Caroline Limbert

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of staff towards psychotropic Pro Re Nata (PRN) medication in a residential care setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of staff towards psychotropic Pro Re Nata (PRN) medication in a residential care setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Three male and seven female participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Four themes pertaining to PRN medication emerged from the data: behaviour change, calming effect, importance of timing and perceived uniqueness.

Research limitations/implications

The participant group was not homogenous and findings may have been different in a more qualified cohort. This care setting may not be representative of other environments where PRN medication is administered. The findings do, however, highlight some of the challenges facing the administration of PRN medication in mental health and care settings.

Practical implications

The awareness of these themes is significant for improving staff knowledge, training practices and policies towards the use and administration of psychotropic PRN medication.

Originality/value

This is the first study to engage in a thematic analysis of staff views towards the administration of PRN medication.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Article

Yvonne Pedley and Paul McDonald

There is often a focus on the negative aspects of residential care for older people. In the UK, there has been increasing media attention on abuse in these and other care

Abstract

Purpose

There is often a focus on the negative aspects of residential care for older people. In the UK, there has been increasing media attention on abuse in these and other care settings and this has impacted upon public perceptions and subsequent government policy. Consequently, care staff are “tarred with the same brush”, yet narratives of their views have rarely been investigated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This undergraduate, qualitative, single-case study aimed to investigate the views of staff and explore the implications for them and their practice. The views of 15 participants in a residential care home were obtained through interviews and a focus group.

Findings

Although the findings reveal sensitivities to the negative portrayal of care roles, they also reveal positive responses through a willingness to change practice, a strengthening of care values and a reduction in risks.

Originality/value

This study will be of interest to those multi-disciplinary residential teams who care for older people as it uncovers a striking sense of guardianship amongst residential care staff, and a willingness to reflect on, and change, practice. The study endorses the value of small practitioner-led research as an illustration of how a residential care team consisting of managers and staff can strengthen its resolve against adverse media coverage and negative public perceptions. This study suggests that this will have positive implications for the health and safety of older people living in residential settings.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article

G Bennett, Ginny Jenkins and Zee Asif

Elder Abuse Response is a UK adult protection helpline for older people which provides a valuable opportunity for monitoring interest in and concerns regarding abuse of…

Abstract

Elder Abuse Response is a UK adult protection helpline for older people which provides a valuable opportunity for monitoring interest in and concerns regarding abuse of older people. This paper provides a descriptive analysis of 1,421 calls to the helpline between April 1997 and March 1999 alleging abuse. The analysis notes types of abuse, age and gender of the victim; gender and relationship of the alleged perpetrator to the victim; and where the abuse was said to have occurred. It discusses possible next steps within the UK for researchers, service planners and providers as a result of the findings in the context of government policy developments.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article

Peter Bates and Brendan McLoughlin

In care homes concerns about abuse have established a culture where all information pertaining to a person must be shared, and little attention is paid to privacy in its…

Abstract

Purpose

In care homes concerns about abuse have established a culture where all information pertaining to a person must be shared, and little attention is paid to privacy in its broader sense. The purpose of this paper is to take a human rights perspective and consider how information governance may impact on the health, well-being and quality of life of residents. It proposes a proactive approach and presents a template for a privacy impact assessment which services could use to improve their approach to privacy, protecting the human rights of those in their care, contributing to their independence and improving outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of historical and current thinking about the value of privacy in human services and wider society leads to a series of challenges to the way in which privacy is upheld in residential care services.

Findings

Recent preoccupations with data privacy have led to a myopic neglect of broader considerations of privacy. Whilst it continues to be important to protect the confidentiality of personal data and to ensure that residents are protected from abuse, human services that provide 24 hour care in congregated settings must not neglect broader components of privacy.

Research limitations/implications

Privacy impact assessments have been widely used to check whether data privacy is being upheld. The broader concept that might be termed “Big Privacy” is introduced within which data privacy is but one section. It is suggested that big privacy is severely compromised in residential care settings, thus denying residents their human right to privacy. The extent of such violation of rights should be investigated.

Practical implications

Having set out the potential reach of the human right to privacy, important work needs to be done to find out how privacy might be upheld in the real world of congregate residential care. Some service providers may have solutions to the organisational challenges, have addressed staff training needs and revised risk assessment strategies so that privacy is upheld alongside other rights.

Social implications

Nearly half a million people live in congregate residential care settings in England, and deprivation of privacy is argued to be a significant deprivation of human rights. Occasional tragedies and scandals in congregate settings create pressure for increasing the level of surveillance, and the right to privacy is sacrificed. This paper offers a challenge to this process, arguing that competing rights need to be balanced and privacy is an essential component of a decent quality of life.

Originality/value

Personal growth and development depends to some extent on choice and control over access to privacy. Recent changes in the law regarding data protection have narrowed our thinking about privacy until it is a small concept, largely concerned with data handling. This paper invites consideration of big privacy, and invites congregate residential care settings to consider how a deep and broad definition of privacy could transform these services.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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