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Ronald H. Humphrey, Janet B. Kellett, Randall G. Sleeth, Chao Miao and Shanshan Qian

To examine empathy as a trait that influences leadership behaviors, which, in turn, influence group decision-making.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine empathy as a trait that influences leadership behaviors, which, in turn, influence group decision-making.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This study uses an assessment center design to maximize internal validity.

Findings

The structural equation model shows that empathy strongly relates to both relationship leadership and task leadership, while cognitive ability only relates to task leadership. Both relationship leadership and task leadership exert influence over group task choice and group decisions. Thus, empathy has its major effects through influencing leader behaviors, which, in turn, have distal impacts on outcomes such as influence over decisions.

Research Limitations/Implications

The study results should be further tested in field settings.

Practical Implications

The findings suggest that organizations should recruit and promote leaders high in empathy.

Originality/Value

This is the first study to test whether leader behaviors mediate the effects of leader empathy on group decision-making.

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

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Article

Janet B. Kellett, Ronald H. Humphrey and Randall G. Sleeth

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that perceived collective efficacy would mediate the effects of self‐efficacy on individual task performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that perceived collective efficacy would mediate the effects of self‐efficacy on individual task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An assessment center design with 147 participants in 49 three‐person groups was used.

Findings

It is found that for individuals working on an assigned group goal, perception of the group's collective efficacy, rather than self‐efficacy, has a direct influence on task performance.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should examine the extent to which cognitive intelligence influences collective efficacy effects.

Practical implications

The research suggests that perceptions of collective efficacy and team support may influence early career developmental task performance.

Originality/value

This paper found that collective efficacy might be more important than individual efficacy in predicting individual task performance in some circumstances.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Abstract

Details

Emotions and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-202-7

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Book part

Abstract

Details

Advances in Positive Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-000-1

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Article

Saleema Kauser and Vivienne Shaw

With the current trend toward globalisation and the increasing competitive and technological challenges of today's environment the formation of international strategic…

Abstract

With the current trend toward globalisation and the increasing competitive and technological challenges of today's environment the formation of international strategic alliances has become an important part of many firm's international business strategies. Experience with international strategic alliances has shown that they face a number of problems, which can often result in the termination of the alliance. This study, therefore, aims to assess the impact of both behavioural and organisational characteristics on the success of international strategic alliances. The results show that behavioural characteristics play a more significant role in explaining overall alliance performance compared to organisational characteristics. High levels of commitment, trust, coordination, interdependence and communication are found to be good predictors of international strategic alliance success. Conflict, meanwhile, is found to hamper good performance. By contrast organisational characteristics such as structure and control mechanisms are found not to strongly influence the success of international strategic alliances.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Thomas Clausen and Vilhelm Borg

This paper aims to identify longitudinal associations between job demands, job resources and experience of meaning at work.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify longitudinal associations between job demands, job resources and experience of meaning at work.

Design/methodolgy/approach

Using data from a longitudinal survey study among 6,299 employees in Danish eldercare who were divided into 301 work‐groups, experience of meaning at work was predicted from a series of job demands and job resources measured at individual level and group level.

Findings

A combination of individual‐level and group‐level measures of job demands and job resources contributed to predicting meaning at work. Meaning at work at follow‐up was predicted by meaning at work at baseline, role ambiguity, quality of leadership, and influence at work at individual level and emotional demands at group level. Individual‐level measures of job demands and job resources proved stronger predictors of meaning at work than group‐level measures.

Research limitations/implications

Psychosocial job demands and job resources predict experience of meaning at work.

Practical implications

Experience of meaning at work constitutes an important organizational resource by contributing to the capacities of employees to deal with work‐related stresses and strains, while maintaining their health and well‐being.

Social implications

Experience of meaning at work is positively associated with well‐being and reduces risk for long‐term sickness absence and turnover. Attention towards enhancing employee experiences of meaning at work may contribute towards the ability of western societies to recruit the necessary supply of labour over the coming decades.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide longitudinal, multi‐level evidence on the association between job demands, job resources and experience of meaning at work.

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