Search results

1 – 10 of over 267000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Thomas Clausen and Vilhelm Borg

This paper aims to identify longitudinal associations between job demands, job resources and experience of meaning at work.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify longitudinal associations between job demands, job resources and experience of meaning at work.

Design/methodolgy/approach

Using data from a longitudinal survey study among 6,299 employees in Danish eldercare who were divided into 301 work‐groups, experience of meaning at work was predicted from a series of job demands and job resources measured at individual level and group level.

Findings

A combination of individual‐level and group‐level measures of job demands and job resources contributed to predicting meaning at work. Meaning at work at follow‐up was predicted by meaning at work at baseline, role ambiguity, quality of leadership, and influence at work at individual level and emotional demands at group level. Individual‐level measures of job demands and job resources proved stronger predictors of meaning at work than group‐level measures.

Research limitations/implications

Psychosocial job demands and job resources predict experience of meaning at work.

Practical implications

Experience of meaning at work constitutes an important organizational resource by contributing to the capacities of employees to deal with work‐related stresses and strains, while maintaining their health and well‐being.

Social implications

Experience of meaning at work is positively associated with well‐being and reduces risk for long‐term sickness absence and turnover. Attention towards enhancing employee experiences of meaning at work may contribute towards the ability of western societies to recruit the necessary supply of labour over the coming decades.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide longitudinal, multi‐level evidence on the association between job demands, job resources and experience of meaning at work.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Ilaria Buonomo, Paula Benevene and Caterina Fiorilli

Principals’ beliefs about their profession are of great interest for schools in terms of organizational development and success. Furthermore, as meaning is a dimension of…

Abstract

Purpose

Principals’ beliefs about their profession are of great interest for schools in terms of organizational development and success. Furthermore, as meaning is a dimension of eudaimonic well-being, studying the principal meaning of work allows us to deepen the knowledge about their professional well-being, too. According to studies on non-educational contexts, the meaning of work is influenced by several organizational variables (such as possibilities for professional development and organizational commitment). Despite this, several school workers still lack to recognize the role played in this regard. Trying to fulfill these gaps partially, the purpose of this study is to verify the incremental effect of organizational dimensions and positive feedback from colleagues above and beyond positive beliefs about work.

Design/methodology/approach

An Italian version of the COPSOQ II adapted to school principals was administered to 1,616 school principals. Hierarchical multiple regression was conducted, considering three blocks of variables, namely, positive personal beliefs about work (job satisfaction and self-efficacy); organizational dimensions (role clarity, possibilities for development and sense of belonging to the workplace); positive feedback from colleagues.

Findings

Overall, the variables explained 45% of the variance of the meaning of work. While organizational variables accounted for an incremental 24% of the variance, above and beyond the personal experience of work (F (5, 1,610) = 267.378, p = 0.000), positive feedback from colleagues did not show a significant effect originality. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study regarding the meaning of work at school with specific reference to school principals.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study regarding the meaning of work at school and with specific reference to school principals.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term…

Abstract

A distinction must be drawn between a dismissal on the one hand, and on the other a repudiation of a contract of employment as a result of a breach of a fundamental term of that contract. When such a repudiation has been accepted by the innocent party then a termination of employment takes place. Such termination does not constitute dismissal (see London v. James Laidlaw & Sons Ltd (1974) IRLR 136 and Gannon v. J. C. Firth (1976) IRLR 415 EAT).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Vaneet Kashyap and Ridhi Arora

The purpose of the current study is to examine decent work (DW) as a critical antecedent of work–family enrichment (WFE). Further, it also focuses on understanding the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to examine decent work (DW) as a critical antecedent of work–family enrichment (WFE). Further, it also focuses on understanding the underlying mechanisms that facilitate the linkage of employees' perceptions of DW and WFE by investigating about the mediating role of knowledge workers' experience of meaning at work and their work engagement levels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a quantitative cross-sectional research design using survey administration among faculty members employed in public and private universities of North India.

Findings

Results depicted that in addition to direct relationship between DW and WFE, both meaning at work and work engagement partially mediate the relationship between access to DW and WFE indirectly. These findings showed that the provision of access to DW by organizations will help facilitate WFE via employees' experience of meaning at work and their levels of engagement with their work.

Practical implications

The study findings would be useful for organizational practitioners and policymakers to design sustainable human resource development (HRD) policies and practices for enriching the WFE of employees as well as in driving talent retention and engagement.

Originality/value

It is one of the few studies that captures perceptions of employees about access to DW policies and practices and its role in enhancing WFE in the South Asian context. Further, it also advances our knowledge on antecedents and consequences of WFE.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Babar Dharani, Margaux Giannaros and Kurt April

Employee boredom is of concern to organizations because of its impact on employees’ quality of work life and productivity. This study aims to test the regulation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee boredom is of concern to organizations because of its impact on employees’ quality of work life and productivity. This study aims to test the regulation of workplace boredom through meaning in life by workplace heroes to contribute to theory by examining the relationships between the variables and to practice by uncovering the potential of workplace heroes in alleviating state boredom.

Design/methodology/approach

Using online surveys and structured interviews for a mixed-method study, data were collected for state boredom, meaning in life and hero affirmation at work for a quantitative study, and data from the open-ended questions provided further insights regarding hero affirmation at work for a qualitative study.

Findings

Spearman rank-order correlations concluded correlations between state boredom and meaning in life. However, unlike personal heroes that influence meaning in life, workplace heroes were found not to. The qualitative analysis revealed three prime differences between workplace and personal heroes: proximity, symbolic representation of ideologies and qualities admired in the heroes. These reasons entailed that state boredom was not regulated by workplace heroes.

Originality/value

The model of Coughlan et al. (2019) explored trait boredom regulation through meaning in life by personal heroes. This study tested for the regulation of state boredom through meaning in life by workplace heroes; thus, contributing to theory through a nuanced model with enhanced usefulness in practice. The study also further dissects the concept of heroes by uncovering differences between workplace and personal heroes that perpetrated the differences in the findings.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Julie Ménard and Luc Brunet

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between authenticity at work and well‐being. First, the relationship between authenticity at work and hedonic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between authenticity at work and well‐being. First, the relationship between authenticity at work and hedonic and eudemonic well‐being indexes is assessed. Second, the mediating role of meaning of work in the relationship between authenticity at work and subjective well‐being at work is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 360 managers from public organizations completed self‐reported questionnaires. Multiple hierarchical regressions were used to assess the hypotheses.

Findings

Cognitive and behavioral components of authenticity at work explained a significant proportion of variance in each hedonic and eudemonic well‐being indexes. Authenticity is positively associated with well‐being at work. Moreover, meaning of work is a partial mediator of the relationship between authenticity and subjective well‐being at work.

Practical implications

The results suggest that meaning of work is a mechanism in the relationship between authenticity and subjective well‐being at work. The study highlighted a growing need to promote authenticity within organizations since it has been associated with public managers' well‐being.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study showing the positive relationship between authenticity and well‐being in the workplace amongst public organizations managers. It sheds a very new light on the importance of authenticity in work settings and on how it could be linked to meaningfulness in managerial roles.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Stuart Hannabuss

The meaning of management is partly the management of meaning. Management is an activity in which people collaborate not just over what they do but also how they mean: how…

Abstract

The meaning of management is partly the management of meaning. Management is an activity in which people collaborate not just over what they do but also how they mean: how concepts like “effective” are defined and made actual through work, and how knowledge can properly be applied to management situations. Such knowledge is not merely intellectual; it takes in values and belief systems and the intentionalities of discourse. Management is also an area in which over‐arching paradigms of what is best to know and do demonstrate pluralistic and collaborative features. What is known, and what is best to know, therefore, are built up through negotiation and reformulation. This occurs in settings characterised by organisational cultures and authority structures like line management, and in these we find meanings being negotiated for many complex cognitive, ideological and interpersonal reasons (such as to avoid “loss of face”). In professional information training, it is important to develop knowledge of, and skills in, the management of meaning, using negotiative strategies and tactics.

Details

Library Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Farhad Analoui and Andrew Kakabadse

Discussions about conflict at work generally tend to revolve aroundexamples of overt industrial action, taken against an employer by agroup of well‐organised employees. As…

Abstract

Discussions about conflict at work generally tend to revolve around examples of overt industrial action, taken against an employer by a group of well‐organised employees. As the service sector becomes increasingly prominent within the UK, this model is no longer adequate – if it ever was – since much action is covert and individualistic in nature. Moreover, managers themselves may also engage in activities designed to defy or subvert central policy initiatives. This monograph is concerned with an analysis of such activities in a night‐club environment, and is based on six years research during which one of the authors worked as an employee for a large service sector organisation. It illustrates graphically the way in which employees resisted management instructions, or sought to “get even” with individuals who had alienated them. The implications which this research suggests for improving systems of management in an environment such as this are assessed.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1972

L.J. Salmon, L.J. Sachs and L.J. Buckley

July 29, 1971 Docks — Port Talbot — “Dock estate” — Meaning — New harbour and jetty built adjacent to old harbour — Whether part of port of Port Talbot — “Dock work” …

Abstract

July 29, 1971 Docks — Port Talbot — “Dock estate” — Meaning — New harbour and jetty built adjacent to old harbour — Whether part of port of Port Talbot — “Dock work” — “Discharging from ship” — Discharging ore involving work with unloaders and belt conveyor system — “Cargo” — Meaning — Dock Labour Scheme for the South Wales Ports (1942) App. (4) — Port of Port Talbot Registration Amended Scheme (1943) Sch. para. l(l)(a) — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) Act, 1946 (9 & 10 Geo. VI, c.22), s. 6 — Dock Workers (Regulation of Employment) (Amendment) Order, 1967 (S. 1. 1967, No. 1252), Sch. 2, App. 1M(4).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Gayathri Wijesinghe

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what…

Abstract

This chapter examines how hospitality and tourism researchers can use ‘expressive text’ (or writing) to express the lived quality of an experience in order to ‘show what an experience is really like’ rather than ‘tell what it is like’. Expressive text refers to written language forms such as narrative, poetry and metaphor that can be used as tools in research to vividly represent the meaning and feeling conveyed in an experience. The expressive text-based approach to researching lived experience provides a textual link between experience and its expression. For this reason, it is especially useful when working with lived experience accounts of phenomenological and hermeneutic research.

The expressive text-based approach suggested here is still a relatively under explored arena within hospitality and tourism research. As a relatively under explored arena, the rich insightful knowledge that can be gained from understanding practitioner experience is rarely a central focus of scholarly writings about the workplace in hospitality and tourism contexts. However, in order to be fully appreciated as a discipline in its own right and to advance knowledge of the field, understanding the typical and significant attributes of hospitality and tourism work will be decidedly helpful.

One of the difficulties of working with lived experience accounts is finding a suitable research approach that helps to both retain the lived elements of the experience and ensure the rigour of the inquiry. An expressive text-based methodological framework that has a phenomenological and hermeneutic philosophical underpinning is argued to be suitable for this purpose. Therefore, the focus of this study is to discuss such a methodology and explain the reasons for its content, style and structure in researching lived experience. The approach that is proposed here consists of a five-tiered textually expressive methodology that is employed to contextualise, portray and interpret the lived experience meanings in order to understand the significance of the experience in relation to relevant discourses in hospitality and tourism studies, and to consider implications for policy and professional practice. The guiding questions of the five-tiered framework cover the following issues: (1) What is the context of the lived experience? (2) What is the lived experience of this practice like? (3) What is the meaning of this experience for the practitioner? (4) What is the significance of the experience in contributing to the advancement of knowledge within the field? (5) What are the implications for practice and professional development?

To illustrate uses of this methodology in research, the study here includes an example showing portrayals and interpretations of the typical and significant lived nature of hospitality reception work. This shows and communicates the full meaning of the episode, circumstances or situation. The chapter then concludes with some reflections on benefits as well as tensions in working within an expressive text-based phenomenological and hermeneutic framework.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 267000