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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Raj Prasanna, Lili Yang, Malcolm King and Thomas J. Huggins

There has been a lack of meaningful information systems architecture, which comprehensively conceptualise the essential components and functionality of an information system for…

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Abstract

Purpose

There has been a lack of meaningful information systems architecture, which comprehensively conceptualise the essential components and functionality of an information system for fire emergency response addressing needs of different job roles. The purpose of this paper is to propose a comprehensive information systems architecture which would best support four of the key firefighter job roles.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has built on the outcomes of two previous preliminary studies on information and human-computer interaction needs of core firefighter job roles. Scenario-based action research was conducted with firefighters in a range of roles, to evaluate human-computer interaction needs while using various technology platforms.

Findings

Several key themes were identified and led us to propose several layers of an integrated architecture, their composition and interactions.

Research limitations/implications

The selected fire scenarios may not represent every type of fire expected in high-risk built environments.

Practical implications

The current paper represents a shared discussion between end users, system architects and designers, to understand and improve essential components. It therefore provides a reference point for the development of information system architecture for fire emergency response.

Originality/value

The proposed information system architecture is novel because it outlines specific architectural elements required to meet the specific situation awareness needs of different firefighters job roles.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2022

Kelum Jayasinghe, Chandana Wijesinghe, Chaminda Wijethilake and Raj Prasanna

This paper examines how the properties and patterns of a collaborative “networked hierarchy” incident command system (ICS) archetype can provide incident command centres with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how the properties and patterns of a collaborative “networked hierarchy” incident command system (ICS) archetype can provide incident command centres with extra capabilities to manage public service delivery during COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper illustrates the case of Sri Lanka's COVID-19 administration during its “first wave” (from 15 February to 1 September 2020). Primary data were collected through in-depth interviews with government officials who were directly involved in the administration of the COVID-19 outbreak. Secondary data sources were government publications and web sources. The data were analysed and interpreted by using narrative analysis and archetype theory respectively.

Findings

The findings highlight how Sri Lanka's public sector responses to COVID-19 have followed a collaborative “networked hierarchy” ICS archetype. More specifically, the government changed its normative ICS “properties” by incorporating a diverse group of intergovernmental agencies such as the police, the military, the health service and administrative services by articulating new patterns of collaborative working, namely, organisational values, beliefs and ideas that fit with the Sri Lankan public service context.

Originality/value

In responding to high magnitude healthcare emergencies, the flexibility of a collaborative networked ICS hierarchy enables different balances of organisational properties to be incorporated, such as hierarchy and horizontal networking and “patterns” in public service provision.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Kelum Jayasinghe, Christine M. Kenney, Raj Prasanna and Jerry Velasquez

The paper illustrates how accountability of collaborative governance was constituted in the context of disaster managerial work carried out by the Government, local authorities…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper illustrates how accountability of collaborative governance was constituted in the context of disaster managerial work carried out by the Government, local authorities, and Maori community organisations, after the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquakes in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study detailing the communitarian approach to disaster recovery management by a nationalised Maori earthquake response network is contrasted with the formal emergency management infrastructure's response to the Canterbury earthquakes.

Findings

Critical analysis of the effectiveness and failures of these approaches highlights the institutional and cultural political issues that hinder the institutionalization of collaborative and accountable governance in the fields of disaster risk reduction and emergency management.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the accountability research and practice in general and disaster accountability in particular by addressing a more multifaceted model of ‘accountability combined with collaborative governance’ as a way to build on and critique some of the seemingly more narrow views of accountability.

Originality/value

The study presents rare insights on the interactions between formal and community level accountability and collaborative governance in the context of New Public Governance (NPG).

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Melodena Stephens Balakrishnan

Managing brands during crisis (in the context of terrorism) does not have much historical research and the studies that exist focus on communication. Terrorism is more frequent;…

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Abstract

Purpose

Managing brands during crisis (in the context of terrorism) does not have much historical research and the studies that exist focus on communication. Terrorism is more frequent; not easily prevented; and rarely a top management priority for risk management. The purpose of this paper is to use exiting theory on brand components and architecture to prevent brand burn. Brand burn is defined as the accidental negative impact formed on a brand due to a crisis outside the control of an organization, which may not be perceived as directly related to the organization's product or management.

Design/methodology/approach

Crises are characterized by an overload of information. The exploratory study uses a case study methodology to get insights on how to manage a brand through a crisis. To validate findings, triangulation using independent reviewers, theory and secondary reports is used.

Findings

First, a conceptual framework to manage brand burn is presented. Second, from the practitioner's point of view, the paper provides a checklist that gives strategic tips for preparing for and managing brand crisis. The findings show that both brand components and brand architecture can be used to manage brands through crisis.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to theory by adding to the evolving literature on brand architecture, brand components and crisis management. Key challenges were organizing and prioritizing the vast amount of data from secondary sources, including social media sites; time was an issue as memories fade; and another limitation was getting official confirmation since perceptions play a key role.

Originality/value

This is the first study looking at a terrorist crisis from a brand management point of view. This paper contributes to theory by adding to the research in brand architecture and brand components and crisis management. Future studies can look at the model robustness in other crisis situations and the impact of managing social media.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2018

Kavilal E.G., Shanmugam Prasanna Venkatesan and Joshi Sanket

Easily employable quantitative supply chain complexity (SCC) measures considering the significant dimensions of complexity as well as the drivers that represent those dimensions…

Abstract

Purpose

Easily employable quantitative supply chain complexity (SCC) measures considering the significant dimensions of complexity as well as the drivers that represent those dimensions are limited in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to propose an integrated interpretive structural modeling (ISM) and a graph-theoretic approach to quantify SCC by a single numerical index considering the interdependence and the inheritance of the SCC drivers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 18 SCC drivers identified from the literature are clustered according to the significant dimensions of complexity. The interdependencies established through ISM and inheritance values of SCC drivers are mapped into a Variable Permanent Matrix (VPM). The permanent function of this VPM is then computed and the resulting single numerical index is the measure of SCC.

Findings

A scale is proposed by computing the minimum and maximum threshold values of SCC with the help of expert opinions of the Indian automotive industry. The complexity of commercial and passenger vehicle sectors within the automotive industry is measured and compared using the proposed scale. From the results, it is identified that the number of suppliers, increase in spare-parts due to shortened product life-cycle and demand uncertainties increase the SCC of the passenger vehicle sector, while number of parts, products and processes, variety of products and process and unreliability of suppliers increase the complexity of the commercial vehicle sector. The result indicates that various SCC drivers have a different impact on determining the SCC level of these two sectors.

Originality/value

The authors propose an integrated method that can be readily applied to measure and quantify SCC considering the significant dimensions of complexity as well as the interdependence and the inheritance of the SCC drivers that contribute to those dimensions. This index further helps to compare the complexity of the supply chain which varies between industries.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Manjula Venkataraghavan, Padma Rani, Lena Ashok, Chythra R. Rao, Varalakshmi Chandra Sekaran and T.K. Krishnapriya

Physicians who are primary care providers in rural communities form an essential stakeholder group in rural mobile health (mHealth) delivery. This study was exploratory in nature…

Abstract

Purpose

Physicians who are primary care providers in rural communities form an essential stakeholder group in rural mobile health (mHealth) delivery. This study was exploratory in nature and was conducted in Udupi district of Karnataka, India. The purpose of this study is to examine the perceptions of rural medical officers (MOs) (rural physicians) regarding the benefits and challenges of mobile phone use by community health workers (CHWs).

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted among 15 MOs belonging to different primary health centers of the district. Only MOs with a minimum five years of experience were recruited in the study using purposive and snowball sampling. This was followed by thematic analysis of the data collected.

Findings

The perceptions of MOs regarding the CHWs' use of mobile phones were largely positive. However, they reported the existence of some challenges that limits the potential of its full use. The findings were categorized under four themes namely, benefits of mobile phone use to CHWs, benefits of mobile phone-equipped CHWs, current mobile phone use by CHWs and barriers to CHWs' mobile phone use. The significant barriers reported in the CHWs' mobile phone use were poor mobile network coverage, technical illiteracy, lack of consistent technical training and call and data expense of the CHWs. The participants recommend an increased number of mobile towers, frequent training in mobile phone use and basic English language for the CHWs as possible solutions to the barriers.

Originality/value

Studies examining the perceptions of doctors who are a primary stakeholder group in mHealth as well as in the public health system scenario are limited. To the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies to examine the perception of rural doctors regarding CHWs' mobile phone use for work in India.

Details

Health Education, vol. 122 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Jenarthanan MP, Prasanna Kumar Reddy Gavireddy, Chetan Sai Gummadi and Surya Ramesh Mandapaka

This paper aims to investigate the effect and parametric optimization of process parameters during milling of glass fibre-reinforced plastics (GFRP) composites using grey…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect and parametric optimization of process parameters during milling of glass fibre-reinforced plastics (GFRP) composites using grey relational analysis (GRA).

Design/methodology/approach

Experiments are conducted using helix angle, spindle speed, feed rate, depth of cut and fibre orientation angle as typical process parameters. GRA is adopted to obtain grey relational grade for the milling process with multiple characteristics, namely, machining force and material removal rate (MRR). Analysis of variance is performed to get the contribution of each parameter on the performance characteristics.

Findings

It is observed that helix angle and fibre orientation angle are the most significant process parameters that affect the milling of GFRP composites. The experimental results reveal that the helix angle of 45°, spindle speed of 3000 rpm, feed rate of 1000 mm/min, depth of cut of 2 mm and fibre orientation angle of 15° is the optimum combination of lower machining force and higher MRR. The experimental results for the optimal setting show that there is considerable improvement in the process.

Originality/value

Optimization of process parameters on machining force and MRR during endmilling of GFRP composites using GRA has not been attempted previously.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Mengyi Zhu, Yuan Sun, Anand Jeyaraj and Jie Hao

This study aims to explore whether and how task characteristics affect employee agility in the context of enterprise social media (ESM).

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether and how task characteristics affect employee agility in the context of enterprise social media (ESM).

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the social network ties perspective, this study examines how task characteristics (i.e. task complexity, task interdependence and task non-routineness) affect employee agility by promoting their social network ties (i.e. instrumental ties and expressive ties) and how ESM visibility moderates their relationships. Data gathered from 341 ESM users in workplaces were analyzed using Smart-PLS 3.2.

Findings

First, task complexity, task interdependence and task non-routineness have positive effects on instrumental and expressive ties, which in turn influences agility; Second, instrumental ties have a stronger effect on employee agility relative to expressive ties; Finally, ESM visibility positively moderates the effects of task complexity and task non-routineness on social network ties.

Practical implications

The findings provide guidance for organizational managers on how to use task characteristics and ESM to improve employee agility, as well as insights for social media designers to optimize ESM functions to improve agility.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence to explain the roles of task characteristics and social network ties in influencing employee agility, thus clarifying the inconsistent findings in extant research. The moderating effects of ESM visibility on the relationships between task characteristics and social network ties are also examined, thus providing further insights on the positive role of ESM in organizations.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2023

Yuan Sun, Zhu Mengyi and Anand Jeyaraj

This paper aims to investigate whether and how enterprise social media (ESM) affordances affect employee agility.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether and how enterprise social media (ESM) affordances affect employee agility.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting self-determination theory (SDT), this study examines a model in which the four ESM affordances (i.e. visibility, association, editability and persistence) impact employee agility through the three basic psychological needs satisfaction (i.e. perceived autonomy, perceived relatedness and perceived competence) of employees. Mplus 7.4 was used to analyze survey data gathered from 304 employees who used ESM in the workplace.

Findings

The authors’ findings show that all four ESM affordances contribute to perceived relatedness and perceived competence; visibility and association affordances also have positive impacts on perceived autonomy; and all three psychological needs satisfaction positively impact employee agility.

Originality/value

First, this study adapted SDT to explore how ESM influences employee agility. Second, this study enriches the relevant research on the antecedents of employee agility and also provides new evidence and theoretical support for employee agility. Third, this study effectively expands the antecedents and outcomes of employee basic psychological needs satisfaction in the domain of ESM and agility.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2013

Sudha Kornginnaya

To describe the Pragathi Bandhu Groups (PBG) Model and portray the performance of PBG farmers encouraged by their financial and decision-making participation in micro financing…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe the Pragathi Bandhu Groups (PBG) Model and portray the performance of PBG farmers encouraged by their financial and decision-making participation in micro financing and labor sharing, as well as to analyze the factors that influenced participation of small farmers in PBG.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study is confined to the small farmers and laborers of PBG functioning in the coastal districts of Karnataka State in India. The study is conducted in Belthangady and Bantwal Taluks of Dakshina Kannada (DK) Districts-Udupi taluk of Udupi District in the State of Karnataka. Primary data from 100 farmer members, selected at random in each of the Taluks, is collected through personal interview by administering semi-structured interview schedules and open discussion. In addition, the data on the functions and the performance of PBG in the State of Karnataka in India are also collected from the official records of Shri Kshetra Dharmasthala Rural Development Project (SKDRDP) and their field-level functionaries through informal discussions. Factor analysis is performed with principal component analysis followed by Varimax rotation to analyze the factors that influenced participation of small farmers in PBG.

Findings

Results show that the implementation of PBG Model, through the collective participation of small farmers in micro financing, free labor sharing, financial and decision-making activities underlying the functions of PBG Model, has helped them to achieve robust performance in terms of increased savings mobilization, loan utilization, and value of free labor sharing and acres of land brought under cultivation with the help of irrigation facilities created by them. The factor analysis has derived four factors that influenced the participation of farmers in PBG (agriculture development, financial participation, capacity building, and other benefits) which explain 63.701 of total factor variance.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper can benefit the small farmers and laborers in replicating the PBG Model and its initiatives that address shortages of labor and credit, as well as the high cost of labor, particularly in the unorganized sector in the agrarian economy.

Originality/value

The insights offered are likely to be beneficial to the distressed small farmers, development agencies, and agriculture policy makers to solve the agrarian crisis caused due to shortages of labor and farm credit.

Details

Sharing Ownership, Profits, and Decision-Making in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-750-4

Keywords

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