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1 – 10 of 12
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Raghu Raghavan and Edward Griffin

Building the resilience of children with intellectual disabilities (ChID) can help reduce the personal, social and economic costs associated with mental ill health among such…

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Abstract

Purpose

Building the resilience of children with intellectual disabilities (ChID) can help reduce the personal, social and economic costs associated with mental ill health among such children. The purpose of this paper is to review the research evidence on resilience in ChID and to suggest areas for further research.

Design/methodology/approach

Journal articles published in the last 20 years were searched in on-line databases to find potential papers for this review. The inclusion criteria were to search for published journal articles covering the theme of resilience in ChID and their families. All identified titles and abstracts were screened which resulted in 50 articles. These were scrutinised more thoroughly and 34 remaining articles were selected for review.

Findings

Resilience is a dynamic process involving interactions between various risk and protective processes both internal and external to the individual that act to mediate the influences of adverse life events. Five key themes were identified within the literature which helped to form a picture of the current understanding of resilience among ChID and their careers. These were increased risk factors associated with ID, the role of personal attributes on resilience, family and resilience, schooling and resilience, and cultural factors which enhance resilience.

Originality/value

Despite the consistency with which poor outcomes for ChID have been reported there is little investigation of the specific causes, contributory factors and processes that might improve them. This paper contributes to greater understanding of resilience factors for children and young people with ID and provides areas for further research.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Jackie Wales, Nicola Brewin, Raghu Raghavan and Jon Arcelus

Referrals to specialist eating disorder (ED) services from the South Asian (SA) community are under-represented, despite research suggesting that disordered eating attitudes and…

Abstract

Purpose

Referrals to specialist eating disorder (ED) services from the South Asian (SA) community are under-represented, despite research suggesting that disordered eating attitudes and behaviours of SA people are similar to the population in general. The purpose of this paper is to identify the reasons for this and sought to inform ways to encourage help-seeking.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used to investigate barriers to help-seeking for EDs among the SA community. A key informant focus group was conducted with clinicians working within the local specialist ED service (participants n=16, 12 female, 4 male). Six focus groups were conducted with members of the SA community in Leicester, UK (participants n=28, 23 female, 5 male), recruited from a local university, two charities and Children, Young People and Family Centres.

Findings

A number of themes emerged as possible factors for delaying early access to help: lack of knowledge about EDs and their potential seriousness, ideals regarding body shape, family living circumstances and the role of food in the community. Participants acknowledged stigma among their community associated with mental health issues, including EDs and concerns about confidentiality when approaching services, particularly primary care.

Originality/value

General practitioners and specialist services need to be aware of the potential barriers to help-seeking for EDs as early specialist help is recommended for effective treatment. An educational campaign around EDs specifically designed with the SA community in mind may improve awareness, reduce stigma and promote early help-seeking.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Jonathan Coope, Andy Barrett, Brian Brown, Mark Crossley, Raghu Raghavan and Muthusamy Sivakami

The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the literature on mental health resilience and other positive mental health capacities of urban and internal migrants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the literature on mental health resilience and other positive mental health capacities of urban and internal migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this narrative review included a search of articles published up to 2017. The abstracts were screened and relevant articles studied and discussed. Literature on the particular mental health challenges of urban migrants in India was also studied. References found in the literature relating to neurourbanism were also followed up to explore broader historical and conceptual contexts.

Findings

Several key sources and resources for mental health resilience were identified – including familial and community networks and individual hope or optimism. Nevertheless, much of the literature tends to focus at the level of the individual person, even though ecological systems theory would suggest that mental health resilience is better understood as multi-layered, i.e. relevant to, and impacted by, communities and broader societal and environmental contexts.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into an aspect of migrant mental health that has tended to be overlooked hitherto: the mental health resilience and positive mental health capacities of urban migrants. This is particularly relevant where professional “expert” mental health provision for internal migrant communities is absent or unaffordable. Previous work has tended to focus predominantly on mental health risk factors, despite growing awareness that focusing on risk factors along can lead to an over-reliance on top-down expert-led interventions and overlook positive capacities for mental health that are sometimes possessed by individuals and their communities.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Raghu Raghavan and Fozia Waseem

Children and young people with learning disabilities and mental health problems from black and minority ethnic communities face barriers in accessing services. This paper…

650

Abstract

Children and young people with learning disabilities and mental health problems from black and minority ethnic communities face barriers in accessing services. This paper describes a mapping of services used by young people with learning disabilities and mental health problems from Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities. Overall the participants accessed primary health care services through their GPs, had contact with Social Services for support and benefits and the voluntary sector for culturally appropriate services. Most participants did not access statutory child or adult mental health services, or professionals such as psychologists or behaviour nurse specialists. Families reported key barriers such as lack of awareness of services, language difficulties in communication and lack of culturally sensitive services.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Raghu Raghavan and Nicole Pawson

School leavers with learning disabilities are often lost within service structures as part of the transition process. Many young people lose their social networks at the point of…

357

Abstract

School leavers with learning disabilities are often lost within service structures as part of the transition process. Many young people lose their social networks at the point of transition to adulthood. This paper provides an insight into the views and aspirations of young people, and highlights the importance of social networks in promoting the psychological well‐being of young people with learning disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2010

Raghu Raghavan and Pradip Patel

There is over‐use of psychotropic medication with people with intellectual disabilities. Many of these individuals do not have the capacity to understand and retain the relevant…

417

Abstract

There is over‐use of psychotropic medication with people with intellectual disabilities. Many of these individuals do not have the capacity to understand and retain the relevant information about the use and effectiveness of medication. Professionals and health care practitioners need to be fully aware of the ethical and legal issues in the use and administration of psychotropic medication.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Ereny Gobrial and Raghu Raghavan

Children and young people with co‐morbid intellectual disabilities and autism are more prone to experience mental health problems compared to people with intellectual disabilities…

1754

Abstract

Purpose

Children and young people with co‐morbid intellectual disabilities and autism are more prone to experience mental health problems compared to people with intellectual disabilities but without autism. Children and young people with intellectual disabilities and autism may experience symptoms of anxiety at a greater level than the general population; however, this is not supported with research evidence in relation to the prevalence of anxiety in people with intellectual disabilities and autism. The aim of this study is to identify the prevalence of anxiety disorders in children and young people with intellectual disabilities and autism.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 150 children and young people (age range of 5‐18 years) from a metropolitan district in the North of England were screened for anxiety using the Reiss Scales for Children's Dual Diagnosis and the Glasgow Anxiety Scale.

Findings

The results indicate that the prevalence of anxiety was 32.6 per cent for children and young people with intellectual disabilities and autism on the Glasgow Anxiety Scale. One of the important questions that arise from this study is the risk factors for the high prevalence of anxiety in children and adolescents with autism.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the prevalence of anxiety in children and young people with co‐morbid intellectual disabilities and autism. This has implications for assessment of anxiety disorders for children and young people with intellectual disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Raghu Raghavan

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “A qualitative exploration of the life experiences of adults diagnosed with mild learning disabilities…

388

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “A qualitative exploration of the life experiences of adults diagnosed with mild learning disabilities from minority ethnic communities”.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary outlines the Valuing People White Paper and The Health Care Commission report Tackling the Challenge: Promoting Race Equality in the NHS in England, among others, as they relate to the author's research.

Findings

Developing cultural knowledge is of fundamental importance in working towards race equality in mental health services for children and young people with learning disabilities

Originality/value

Cultural competence refers to the ability to work effectively with individuals from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds, or in settings where several cultures co‐exist. It includes the ability to understand the language, culture and behaviours of other individuals and groups, and to make appropriate recommendations.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

159

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Jeremy Turk

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

1 – 10 of 12