Search results

1 – 10 of over 118000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Todd Woodruff

The need to care for families has been a command focus within the United States military for a number of years. Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the resulting risk…

Abstract

The need to care for families has been a command focus within the United States military for a number of years. Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the resulting risk and family separation, have made the care of families and their satisfaction with military life enormously important due to their impact on retention, morale, and readiness. The US Army has taken a two-pronged approach to caring for families: (1) family friendly leadership; and (2) family friendly programs and policies. Like many other organisations, the Army has invested heavily in family friendly policies and programs, such as family support groups, affordable childcare, medical care, and systems so spouses can communicate during periods of separation. Over the last 15 years, the Army's focus on families has produced a much improved system of support, resulting in almost two-thirds of spouses rating the Army's family support as excellent or good during the war in Iraq.1 (Ricks, 2004, p. 9) While family friendly policies and programs are important in reducing work–family conflict and developing commitment, they are only part of the solution, and are much more effective when combined with supportive leadership. By themselves, policies and programs offer an incomplete solution that would achieve only partial success at best, particularly as the level of demands made by the organisation increase.

Details

Military Missions and their Implications Reconsidered: The Aftermath of September 11th
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-012-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Jeanne R. Heitmeyer, Kay Grise and Christine A. Readdick

The purpose of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences in single‐ and dual‐parent family households in their selection and acquisition of children's…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the similarities and differences in single‐ and dual‐parent family households in their selection and acquisition of children's clothing. Respondents included 247 parents of students enrolled in grades K‐12. Significant differences were found in the following items considered. Lack of money was more of a problem for single‐parent families than for dual‐parent families, p = 0.002. Single‐parent families paid for clothing more often by cheque or cash than did dual‐parent families, p=0.009; dual‐parent families used store credit cards more frequently than single‐parent families, p=0.03. No significant differences were found in sources, important purchase factors or satisfaction when selecting and acquiring children's clothing. For all parents, the four most important factors considered when selecting children's clothing were fit, what the parent likes, care required and price. Please note that in the US most children begin school at age 5 in kindergarten (K); ele‐mentary school continues through age 10 at grade 5; middle school encompasses ages 11–13 in grades 6–8; and high school includes ages 14–17 in grades 9–12.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Jo Easton

Abstract

Details

Death in Custody
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-026-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 November 2021

Asael Islas-Moreno, Manrrubio Muñoz-Rodríguez, Vinicio Horacio Santoyo-Cortés, Norman Aguilar-Gallegos, Enrique Genaro Martínez-González and Wyn Morris

This study analyses the sequence of actions carried out by successful enterprises in the agricultural sector and aims to understand the logic followed with such actions…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the sequence of actions carried out by successful enterprises in the agricultural sector and aims to understand the logic followed with such actions and the differences related to the types of families that develop them.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a multiple case study approach, the business and family trajectories of 14 successful agricultural enterprises in Mexico were analysed. The actions carried out by enterprises are conceptualized as strategic movements and are classified into seven categories: (1) growth and intensification, (2) reconversion, (3) diversification, (4) integration, (5) differentiation, (6) outsourcing and (7) digitization. Depending on their relationship with agriculture, entrepreneurial families are classified into three categories: (1) continuing families, (2) returning families and (3) incoming families.

Findings

The entrepreneurship logic follows three stages: evaluation, expansion and consolidation, through which different activities are tested, then the one that produces the best results is expanded and adopted as the main activity, and finally the expansion of the main activity and its evaluation are combined by comparing and complementing it with other agricultural activities. The difference is that continuing families adhere more to the traditional productivist model based on growth in scale and improved productivity of primary production. On the other hand, actions that imply a distinction in the quality of production such as integration and differentiation and that require links with other organizations such as outsourcing are more frequently carried out by returning and incoming families.

Research limitations/implications

The findings obtained through case studies cannot be statistically generalized to a specific population, however, our perspective can be transferred to other cases to obtain analogous findings.

Originality/value

The study is a unique piece in terms of the analysis of how families with different degrees of proximity to agriculture develop successful enterprises.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2021

Patricia Lannen and Isabelle Duss

Children from disadvantaged families often already show developmental deficits at the time of school entry. The goal of Schritt:weise, a preventive, easy-access early…

Abstract

Purpose

Children from disadvantaged families often already show developmental deficits at the time of school entry. The goal of Schritt:weise, a preventive, easy-access early education program for children ages one to five is to avoid such deficits through a combination of home visits by semi-professionals as well as center-based group activities. The program has been translated and adapted from the Dutch program Opstapje and is now being implemented in different regions in Switzerland. To offer the program more readily in rural areas, four adapted models were developed. This paper aims to provide a mixed-method, combined process and outcome evaluation of these newly developed models.

Design/methodology/approach

For this combined process and outcome evaluation, standardized testing for child development outcomes and interviews with different stakeholders were conducted.

Findings

The evaluation found that implementation of all four models was feasible and children developed along the norm in all four of the models. This finding was confirmed one year after program completion.

Research limitations/implications

Building an evidence-base to better understand success of early intervention programs is key to effectively supporting children from disadvantaged families in their development.

Practical implications

This early education program using home-visitation with semi-professionals is feasible and successful in reaching children from disadvantaged families.

Social implications

It is possible to support children from disadvantaged families through the program Schritt:weise and prevent developmental deficits at school entry.

Originality/value

The finding that children developed along the norm in all four models means that the key program goal was achieved and that the specific implementation model can be chosen based on the specifics of the implementation context.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

Anne Huisken, Joan L. Bottorff and Catherine Nesmith

Healthy Together (HT) is an innovative family education program focused on bringing families together to promote physical activity and healthy eating. The HT program was…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthy Together (HT) is an innovative family education program focused on bringing families together to promote physical activity and healthy eating. The HT program was implemented in 10 community-based organizations across Canada offering services to immigrant and refugee families. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of HT when offered to these families.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, non-comparative design was used. Caregiver participants were invited to complete a survey at the end of 15, 30 or 24 HT sessions. Trained program facilitators and directors of community-based organizations also provided feedback on the program.

Findings

Among the 203 caregiver participants, 135 (64%) were born outside of Canada. These caregivers were more likely to attend 50% or more of the HT sessions than Canadian-born caregivers. Survey responses show that the HT program was acceptable to immigrant and refugee caregivers and held important benefits for families including positive changes in healthy eating and physical activity, strengthening social connections and learning about community services and resources. Areas for enhancing the HT program for immigrant and refugee families were identified by participant caregivers and community organizations delivering the program.

Practical implications

The HT program demonstrates the value of family-centered program models in supporting immigrant and refugee families in establishing healthy lifestyles and building social connections in ways that hold promise for long-term impact.

Originality/value

The HT program model demonstrates strong potential to fill gaps in community programming for immigrant and refugee families. Although focused on promoting healthy lifestyles, the program extends additional benefits that can positively influence resettlement trajectories. The findings contribute to the growing field of implementation studies that are focused on expanding the reach and impact of community health interventions in a real-world setting while reaching multiple target populations.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Jill Davies

Valuing People calls for a new relationship between families and staff in learning disability services. It proposes that the voices of family carers be heard, and that…

Abstract

Valuing People calls for a new relationship between families and staff in learning disability services. It proposes that the voices of family carers be heard, and that they should be treated as partners in policy development and implementation, including their involvement in staff training and development. The Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities has developed a tool to help staff and families to work better together. The result is a training resource called Learning with Families ‐ a training resource with a difference: the contents were developed by family carers, who are also being encouraged to deliver the training, alongside professionals, to staff who work in learning disability services, in order to improve their understanding of the experiences of families.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2016

Bridgie A. Ford, Shernavaz Vakil and Rachel J. Boit

The essentiality of family involvement in the schooling process is evident from the vast directives embedded within federal mandates, professional standards for teachers…

Abstract

The essentiality of family involvement in the schooling process is evident from the vast directives embedded within federal mandates, professional standards for teachers and administrators, parent organizations, and advocacy groups. Yet, as explicit as legislative mandates and professional standards are regarding parental rights and involvement, they do not require definitive roles of the family. Several factors influence the lack of a decisive definition regarding the role of the family in the schooling process. Those include the different perspectives on what constitutes a family structurally and functionally, the socio-cultural and political diversity within and among populations, the move to an inclusive education framework, the various terms used to describe parental involvement, the realization that no one family model fits the demographic diversity existing in today’s school districts, and the rights of family members to select their level of involvement. Given the importance of family engagement and student outcomes, three fundamental questions addressed in this chapter are, “How can inclusive schools enhance productive collaborative family engagement networks?” “How can the family be empowered to voluntarily participate within those networks?” and “How can inclusive schools connect with teacher preparation programs to promote the competency of educators for those collaborative family/school engagement networks?” In this chapter we delineate an interactive triad conceptual model with the school as the “connecting agent” to build relationships with families and teacher preparation, setting the stage for productive family engagement as partners in inclusive settings.

Details

General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Roles of Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-543-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2017

David McConnell and Amber Savage

In this chapter, we report findings from a three-year, survey- and interview-based study involving 538 families bringing up children with disabilities in Alberta, Canada…

Abstract

In this chapter, we report findings from a three-year, survey- and interview-based study involving 538 families bringing up children with disabilities in Alberta, Canada. The focus of the study was on the everyday challenge and accomplishment of sustaining a routine of daily life. The families who participated in this study were diverse, yet they struggled with many of the same questions and challenges. Four over-arching and inter-related challenges emerged from our analysis of the interview data. These are difficulty balancing the competing needs and wants of their children; tension between wanting to protect and wanting to integrate their child and family into the community; conflict between earning and care giving activities; and, trouble accessing and navigating supports and services. This chapter includes a small sample of illustrative family stories. The study findings suggest that parents are striving but struggle to meet normative expectations, that is, to simultaneously do all they can to help their disabled child and create a routine that balances the needs and interests of all their children. One conclusion is that service systems and professionals can help and or hinder families as they strive to create and maintain a daily routine that is fitted to the local ecology and family resource-base, and congruent with their values and goals, and with the needs, interests, and competencies of family members.

Details

Working with Families for Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-260-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2008

James P. Ziliak

The extent to which means-tested transfers, social insurance, and tax credits fill the gap between a family's private resources and the poverty threshold is a periodic…

Abstract

The extent to which means-tested transfers, social insurance, and tax credits fill the gap between a family's private resources and the poverty threshold is a periodic barometer of the social safety net. Using data on families from the Current Population Survey I examine how the level and composition of before- and after-tax and after-transfer poverty gaps changed in response to changes in the policy and economic landscapes over the past two decades. The estimates presented here indicate not only dramatic changes in the level and sources of income maintenance programs filling the poverty gap, but also dramatic changes in which demographic groups successfully fill the gap. From the peak-to-peak business-cycle years of 1979 to 1999, the fraction of the gap left unfilled among non-elderly families in poverty has expanded by 25 percent, while the unfilled gap has increased by 50 percent among single female-headed families, families headed by non-whites, and families residing in the Northeast. In a given year the poor in the South fill considerably less of the poverty gap with cash welfare, but make up for much of the shortfall with higher payments of food stamps, SSI, and SSDI. Over time the poor in all regions of the country have substituted SSI, SSDI, and the EITC for cash welfare. Indeed, by 1999 the unfilled gap for families with related children present would be one-fifth larger without the EITC. With the exception of married-couple families, this apparent rate of replacement of disability payments and tax credits for cash welfare is less than one for one, leaving most poor families, especially non-white families and single female-headed families, financially more vulnerable today than in previous decades.

Details

Frontiers of Family Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-542-0

1 – 10 of over 118000