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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Tiffany Puckett

This chapter provides an overview of the importance of cultural competence and how it is developed in some careers by higher education institutions. Included in the…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the importance of cultural competence and how it is developed in some careers by higher education institutions. Included in the discussion is a brief overview of some research and strategies used when attempting to develop cultural competence.

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Lani Russell

The purpose of this paper is to explore and extend understanding of the concept of cultural competence in relation to whiteness, particularly the implications of this link…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and extend understanding of the concept of cultural competence in relation to whiteness, particularly the implications of this link in the context of heightened concerns about safety and risk connected with the responsibilisation of health and social care.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a critical review of academic literature about cultural competence in health and social care, focussing on Scotland. The discussion develops understandings of cultural competence in light of important writing about whiteness and draws on recent related research, for example, about racial patterning in relation to disciplinary proceedings.

Findings

Cultural competence is an example of the neoliberal fusion of the ideals of quality and equality. It is a technology of whiteness which may reinforce racial disadvantage especially in the current environment of responsibilisation. Cultural competence is associated with individual responsibility tropes which undermine state-funded welfare provision and re-inscribe traditional inequalities.

Practical implications

The findings reinforce the importance of a focus on the social determinants of health and challenge “audit” approaches to competence of all kinds, favouring instead the promotion of creativity from the margins.

Originality/value

This paper brings together several areas of literature, which have perhaps previously not overlapped, to identify under-recognised implications of cultural competence in the sector, thus linking the critical discussion to decolonisation and good practice in new ways.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Susan Young and Kristina Lu

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the study results conducted at a four-year university in Hawaii investigating the impact of providing nursing students with an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the study results conducted at a four-year university in Hawaii investigating the impact of providing nursing students with an educational intervention session aimed at improving cultural competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive-correlational research method was used to examine the correlations between a control group and experimental group using pre-and post-tests. The t-test for equality of means and Levene’s test for equality of variances were conducted for statistical analysis on pre-and post-test scores. In addition, a power analysis was conducted due to the small sample size.

Findings

The control group receiving no intervention scored lower on the post-test in overall competency by five points, while the experimental group increased their post-score by five points after receiving the intervention; however, this increase did not change the overall cultural competence score. The results indicate that the educational intervention of a two-hour didactic, discussion and presentation did not provide as robust as what was needed to increase domain scores for the experimental group. Further, the domains of awareness, skill, knowledge, encounter and desire cannot be taught by instruction alone and should be reinforced over time.

Research limitations/implications

The study was a convenience sample and limited by the small sample size. The sample may not be representative of all senior nursing students. The study is limited to one school of nursing in Hawaii; the results may not be generalized to other populations.

Practical implications

This research provides a foundation for future curriculum development and the evaluation of nursing programs. For instance, incorporating a value-added instructional project on cultural competence into each nursing class would increase cultural competence awareness and knowledge.

Social implications

This study also emphasizes the necessity of education in cultural competence for all health professionals, which has implications for improving quality, patient satisfaction and increased health outcomes.

Originality/value

This research is unique to examining and applying an educational intervention on cultural competence for nursing students in Hawaii. This research sheds light on studying the importance of culture competence for nursing students and other health professionals. This is not a skill that can be taught in one class or only even a single immersion experience and should be acquired over time where continuing education and encounters are necessary in order to become culturally competent; this will enable health professionals to provide meaningful and appropriate care to patients.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Zhouyang Gu and Fanchen Meng

In the process of cross-border mergers and acquisitions (M&A), the social capital of enterprises is dynamic. In this context, cross-cultural competence plays an important…

Abstract

Purpose

In the process of cross-border mergers and acquisitions (M&A), the social capital of enterprises is dynamic. In this context, cross-cultural competence plays an important role and can affect the transformation process of social capital and further influence the realisation of M&A performance. However, there is still not enough research on the process of social capital transformation and corporate cross-cultural competence. This study aims to explore the influence mechanism of social capital and the cross-cultural competence of enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, four typical manufacturing M&A case studies were analysed and a grounded theoretical analysis process was used to explore the structure of cross-cultural competence and its impact on the dynamic process of social capital.

Findings

The results of this study imply that social capital experiences three stages of transformation in the process of M&A. There are also four dimensions of corporate cross-cultural competence, which are composed of various factors. These all affect the dynamic process of social capital through different influence mechanisms.

Originality/value

According to the results, a mechanism model was composed to determine how corporate cross-cultural ability affects the social capital process. This is of practical significance as it can enhance the performance of M&A integration in a cross-cultural context.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Melissa Gomez and Linda Darnell

This chapter presents information related to models and frameworks from the perspective of cultural competence in healthcare settings, such as the Joint Commission on…

Abstract

This chapter presents information related to models and frameworks from the perspective of cultural competence in healthcare settings, such as the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Department of Health and Human Services, specifically the Office of Minority Health and Healthy People 2020. National health-related organizations such as the American Physical Therapy Association and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing provide scaffolding for educating future health professionals regarding providing culturally competent care. Research on effectiveness of professional development and integrating cultural competence into the curriculum will be presented along with suggestions for faculty interested in incorporating these models and practices into their courses.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

David Cowan

It is again suggested that people from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities comprise a disproportionately high percentage of mental health inpatients. Furthermore…

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Abstract

It is again suggested that people from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities comprise a disproportionately high percentage of mental health inpatients. Furthermore, the Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) concluded the Department of Health (DH) did not have ‘due regard’ to the Race Equality Duty, retaining major concerns regarding the ability of the DH to ensure future compliance (CRE, 2007). In light of these ongoing problems the DH published a five‐year action plan, Delivering Race Equality (DRE) in Mental Health Care to develop race equality and cultural competence training for mental health practitioners (DH, 2005).A focused review of literature was undertaken, structured around three questions.1. How is cultural competence in mental health care defined?2. How is cultural competence in mental health care delivered?3. How is the delivery of cultural competence in mental health care evaluated?Consensus is lacking on definition of cultural competence and on the sequence of when the components should be acquired, some terms being used interchangeably. It is unclear how cultural competence in mental health care can be delivered. No attempts have been adequately evaluated, particularly by service users (Bhui et al, 2007). More innovative research is needed to develop a consensual definition of cultural competence and to facilitate the delivery and evaluation of such, in ways acceptable to service users and service providers.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Alberto G. Canen and Ana Canen

The present paper aims to discuss the concept of competence from a multicultural perspective, for organisational success. It argues that models that view competence as a…

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1980

Abstract

The present paper aims to discuss the concept of competence from a multicultural perspective, for organisational success. It argues that models that view competence as a sum of competencies for management development within organisations could benefit from a multicultural perspective that put those competencies within the context of cultural sensitivity and understanding, so as to promote a trustworthy organisational environment crucial for any institutional change for competitive edge. It analyses theoretical approaches to the concept of competence in organisations, focusing particularly on those that take into account multicultural concerns and the need for building trust within organisational environments. It then addresses the meanings of competence as understood by executives acting in some organizations in Brazil, depicting emphases and silences in those discourses, as well as implications for logistics and management decision in a multicultural perspective.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Reimara Valk

The purpose of this paper is to explore the human capital (HC) expatriates require and develop during an international assignment (IA) to work effectively and live…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the human capital (HC) expatriates require and develop during an international assignment (IA) to work effectively and live contentedly in a host country.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research entailing interviews with 78 expatriates and repatriates across the globe, investigating the competencies they developed and the HC they gained during their IAs.

Findings

Five interrelated competence clusters were derived: cultural competence (CC); interpersonal competence; intrapersonal competence; global business competence; global leadership competence, each containing competencies crucial for expatriate success.

Research limitations/implications

This study relied on self-reports by expatriates and repatriates. Future research should also include senior/line managers and chief human resource officers from a range of organizations across the world to gather their assessments on the competencies and HC of expatriates and repatriates.

Practical implications

Line/HR managers can use the designed “Expatriate/Repatriate Human Capital model” to assess an individual's overall readiness and capacity to perform effectively in a foreign country and culture and consecutively identify and select the right candidates to undertake IAs.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by presenting a HC model called the “Expatriate and Repatriate Human Capital Model; the body of competence”. The model identifies and defines the competencies/knowledge, skills, abilities and other characteristics (KSAOs) required for intercultural effectiveness and expatriate success and serves as a tool for the selection, training, development and performance evaluation of expatriates and repatriates, in order to aid the accomplishment of individual and organizational objectives.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Christian Olalla-Soler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information resources to solve cultural translation problems at different stages of acquisition of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information resources to solve cultural translation problems at different stages of acquisition of the translator’s cultural competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A process and product-oriented, cross-sectional, quasi-experimental study was conducted with 38 students with German as a second foreign language from the four years of the Bachelor’s degree in Translation and Interpreting at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and ten professional translators.

Findings

Translation students use a wider variety of resources, perform more queries and spend more time on queries than translators when solving cultural translation problems. The students’ information-seeking process is generally less efficient than that of the translators. Training has little impact on the students’ use of electronic information resources for this specific purpose, since all students use them similarly regardless of the year they are in.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been conducted with a small sample and only one language pair from a single pedagogical context. The tendencies observed cannot be generalised to the whole population of translation students.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for translator training, as it encourages the development of efficient information-seeking processes for the resolution of cultural translation problems.

Originality/value

Unlike other studies, this paper focusses on a specific translation problem type. It provides information related to the students’ information-seeking strategies for the resolution of cultural translation problems, which can be useful for translation training.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Runchana Pam Barger

As graduates in higher education engage with multiple constituencies from around the world, having cultural competency skills is valuable. Intercultural competence enables…

Abstract

As graduates in higher education engage with multiple constituencies from around the world, having cultural competency skills is valuable. Intercultural competence enables people to initiate and sustain dialogues among their diverse colleagues and members of the globalized community. In this chapter, Barger examines the role of dialogue education in attaining intercultural competency in graduate courses. According to Vella, dialogue education values inquiry, integrity, and commitment to equity. People should treat others with respect and recognize their knowledge and experience within the community of learning. Dialogue education provides a safe and inclusive place for learners to voice their perspectives and opinions. This chapter utilizes a professor’s reflections with respect to teaching a graduate Intercultural Communication (IC) course in a private liberal-arts college. In the narrative, she discusses teaching and learning strategies to help adult learners understand the importance of intercultural competence and interactions in a multicultural and multilingual world. Barger also examines the integrative reflections of graduate students that took the IC course.

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