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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Mihail Arandarenko, Salvatore Corrente, Maja Jandrić and Mladen Stamenković

Large regional disparities lead, among other things, to significant internal migration flows. Internal migrations, on the other hand, reinforce existing regional…

Abstract

Large regional disparities lead, among other things, to significant internal migration flows. Internal migrations, on the other hand, reinforce existing regional disparities by causing a lack of human capital in underdeveloped regions. In this chapter, we apply the Multiple Criteria Decision Aiding (MCDA) sorting method, ELECTRE Tri-C, to determine the current internal migration potential for districts in Serbia. The method will provide four classes of migration potential, ranging from strong emigration to strong immigration potential, based on the main drivers of internal migration. The main determinants of internal migration flows fall into three groups: (1) economic and labour market indicators, (2) demographic indicators and (3) housing market and amenities indicators.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Thu Thi Hoai Nguyen, Hung Manh Le, Le Quoc Hoi and Hang Thu Pham

This study estimates impact of remittances from internal migration on households' use of bank services in Vietnam.

Abstract

Purpose

This study estimates impact of remittances from internal migration on households' use of bank services in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data from the Vietnam Household Living Standards Survey and the two-stage least squares method (2SLS).

Findings

The results show that receiving internal remittance increases households' probability of having bank accounts and using card services. However, these impacts are different between rural and urban areas.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study reveal the useful role of internal remittance in increasing the probability of households using bank services, thereby enhancing financial inclusion in Vietnam.

Originality/value

Different from the previous studies, the purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of internal remittance on the use of bank services in Vietnam at the household level. This paper targets internal migration because it is the main type of migration in Vietnam. Besides, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first one that compares the role of internal remittance on households' use of bank services in rural and urban areas in Vietnam.

Details

Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, vol. 27 no. 53
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2218-0648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Jorge Alejandro Silva Rodríguez de San Miguel, Esteban Martínez Díaz and Dulce María Monroy Becerril

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between climate change and internal migration in the Americas.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between climate change and internal migration in the Americas.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review type of research synthesize the state of knowledge; it was searched through the Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, among other databases, for articles that focused on climate migration, gender, water stress and models for predicting movement.

Findings

Decreased water availability and increased prevalence to water-related disasters causes internal migration. Also, male out migration is quite prevalent in South American nations with women being left to take care of the families.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further primary research to analyse what actions the Americas are taking to carve out a large policy-making space for themselves in climate change and internal migration.

Originality/value

The 32 papers explored in the discussion section present a novel insight into climate change, water usage, gender and internal migration. The papers also elucidate that cultural and ideological conflicts are bound to occur as the communities move with the receiving society finding it hard to accommodate the needs of the climate migrants.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Nguyen Quynh Phuong and Mokbul Morshed Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to map the “migration pathways” (King and Skeldon, 2010) followed by interviews with a group of Vietnamese international labour migrants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map the “migration pathways” (King and Skeldon, 2010) followed by interviews with a group of Vietnamese international labour migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

Through 50 in-depth interviews, the authors identify the reasons that explain the pathways observed.

Findings

The authors found that more than half of the interviewees did what King and Skeldon describe as a U-turn, whereby the migrants go abroad for work directly from their home town and return to settle there. The remainder did a J-turn, meaning the migrants returned and settled elsewhere. The majority of those doing a J-turn moved to another town/city within the province of their home town. Few return migrants settled outside their home province. The main explanations for the U-turn choice include existing investment in immobile assets in their home town, strong family ties, parental care obligations, lack of skill acquisition from international labour migration, age and for married migrants having children. Poor conditions in their home town, the absence of local job opportunities and better schooling for children were important considerations that made the J-turn more desirable. Having family ties in a new location, and affording the investment needed to settle in a new town, were important explanations to make the J-turn possible.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the need for economic development in rural Vietnam, including the creation of decentralised and sustainable livelihoods, so that return migrants have opportunities to reintegrate within their home communities.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Rabi’u Isah Moh’d and Joseph Boniface Ajefu

Studies on the relationship between migration and health status of individuals most often concentrate on international migrants. In contrast, the purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies on the relationship between migration and health status of individuals most often concentrate on international migrants. In contrast, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between health and internal migration using the first 18 waves of the British Household Survey.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the 12-version of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), an indicator of mental health, and physical health indicators as the health variables. This study uses different econometrics estimation methods in modelling the relationship in order to address omitted variable bias as well as unobserved heterogeneity. The econometric estimation methods include Pooled OLS, random effects (RE), fixed effects (FE) and then probit RE. The authors explore the relationship by comparing the health status of movers and non-movers and different types of internal migration such as between local authority districts and between regions.

Findings

The results of this research suggest that there is healthy migrant effect on migration within UK on some indicators of physical health like arm/leg, heart and migraine/headache problems, but not on mental health indicator. And the effects are similar for both males and females. It is advised therefore that the department of health should improve the health of those affected by these ailments so that they can have a chance to move perhaps to better their lots.

Originality/value

This study uses different econometrics estimation methods in modelling the relationship in order to address omitted variable bias as well as unobserved heterogeneity. The econometric estimation methods include Pooled OLS, RE, FE and then probit RE.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Nguyen Quynh Phuong and Sundar Venkatesh

Limited previous studies about Vietnamese returned migrant workers reviewed that a relatively high rate of migrants returned home before their contract ended. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited previous studies about Vietnamese returned migrant workers reviewed that a relatively high rate of migrants returned home before their contract ended. This paper aims to explore how the decisions to return were made under social lenses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses data obtained through in-depth interviews of contract workers who had worked in Taiwan with a focus on Phu Tho province in Vietnam.

Findings

The authors followed O’Reilly’s (2012) adaption of Practice theory in migration research to examine a group of Vietnamese labour migrants returning from Taiwan. Under this theory, external and internal structures are the two divisions of the social environment. The authors identified external structures that might enable or constraint migrant’s mobility. When negotiating internal structures, Vietnamese women might end their contract early in response to family obligations.

Originality/value

The findings provide insights into how women make their decisions when to return, which may contribute to a better understanding of how to assist women engaged in transnational labour migration.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2018

Shilpi Smita Panda and Nihar Ranjan Mishra

Seasonal labour migration is a common form of temporary migration where the work of the migrant labour depends on seasonal conditions and is performed only during that…

1488

Abstract

Purpose

Seasonal labour migration is a common form of temporary migration where the work of the migrant labour depends on seasonal conditions and is performed only during that period of year. This paper aims to identify the factors and subfactors of temporary labour migration from the existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an extensive review of the literature on temporary labour migration. Studies done from 1990 to 2016 were considered for review. The literatures from research articles, book chapters, working papers, conference papers and field-based project reports from various disciplines, like economics, sociology, anthropology, psychology and management studies were reviewed for critically analysing various factors affecting seasonal labour migration.

Findings

A total of five key factors and 60 subfactors of temporary labour migration were documented from previous studies. The findings of the study are organized under five thematic segments: economic factors, social factors, environmental factors, policy-related factors and psychological factors New aspects of seasonal migration were identified such as “role of labour contractors ”, “inter-generational mobility”, “social networks”, “grassroot politics”, “migrant’s relationship with the agents”, “labour registration process”, “market intervention” and “civil society intervention” after consultation with the subject experts and field study.

Research limitations/implications

The paper restricts itself to include aspects of temporary labour migration. Only the factors and subfactors affecting temporary migration are taken into purview. Further the findings of the paper can be empirically tested to know the significance of each factor and subfactor.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for better understanding of the temporary labour migration process in different context by focussing extensively on the factors of migration. The factors identified can be empirically tested in regional and local context, which would provide effective insights for policy formulation for the welfare and protection of the migrant workers.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils an identified need to provide a holistic review for understanding and documenting various factors and subfactors that affect the process of temporary labour migration.

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Mrittika Basu and Rajib Shaw

Over the last few years, impacts of environmental variability on population migration have been an increasing concern over the world. Estimates have suggested that between…

Abstract

Over the last few years, impacts of environmental variability on population migration have been an increasing concern over the world. Estimates have suggested that between 25 million and 1 billion people could be displaced by climate change over the next 40 years. Though it is very difficult to delineate the specific drivers behind human migration, an attempt has been made in this chapter to discuss various reported cases across the world and more specifically, India where environment has played a major role in population movement. The chapter begins by outlining important definitions of migration and environmentally induced migration. It focuses on how environmental change and environmental hazards, especially water scarcity, contribute to human migration by exploring the mechanisms through which vulnerability and migration are linked. The process of movement and migration is usually subject to a complex set of push and pull forces, where push forces relate to the source area while pull factors relate to the destination. Emphasizing water scarcity as one of the prime push factors behind migration, various instances of population movement have been discussed from various parts of India. Understanding the importance of migration in development of a sustainable society, the chapter identifies various gaps that need to be addressed, which, in turn, will help in incorporating environment-induced migration into the decision-making process.

Details

Water Insecurity: A Social Dilemma
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-882-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Stanley Kojo Dary and Yazidu Ustarz

The paper examines the effect of internal remittances on the employment choices of household heads in rural Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the effect of internal remittances on the employment choices of household heads in rural Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs data from the Ghana Living Standards Survey (GLSS 6) of the Ghana Statistical Service. Due to issues of endogeneity of remittances in relation to labor supply, the paper adopts an instrumental variable approach in the analysis. First, employment choices are categorized into three: (1) wage/salary employment, (2) self-employment and (3) domestic/family employment. The relationship is then modeled as instrumental variable multinomial probit (IV-MNP). Secondly, employment choices are recategorized into two: farm employment and otherwise and modeled as instrumental variable probit (IV-PROBIT). The models are estimated via the conditional mixed process (CMP) estimation technique.

Findings

The results indicate that remittances have a negative effect on self-employment and a positive effect on domestic/family employment. Thus, remittances reduce participation in self-employment but increase participation in domestic/family employment. Furthermore, remittances have a negative effect on participation in farm employment. The results are robust to different measures of remittances: receipt of remittances (dummy) and remittance income.

Practical implications

The results suggest that remittances are used for consumption rather than investing in earning activities. In general, engaging in earning type of employment, whether farm and nonfarm employment will decline with receipt of remittances in rural Ghana. There is a need for policy attention with the increasing migration of people out of rural areas.

Originality/value

Prior to this study, little was known on the effect of internal remittances on labor supply decisions of remittance recipients in Ghana, particularly rural Ghana. This paper contributes significantly to filling this knowledge gap.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Jonathan Coope, Andy Barrett, Brian Brown, Mark Crossley, Raghu Raghavan and Muthusamy Sivakami

The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the literature on mental health resilience and other positive mental health capacities of urban and internal migrants.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of the literature on mental health resilience and other positive mental health capacities of urban and internal migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this narrative review included a search of articles published up to 2017. The abstracts were screened and relevant articles studied and discussed. Literature on the particular mental health challenges of urban migrants in India was also studied. References found in the literature relating to neurourbanism were also followed up to explore broader historical and conceptual contexts.

Findings

Several key sources and resources for mental health resilience were identified – including familial and community networks and individual hope or optimism. Nevertheless, much of the literature tends to focus at the level of the individual person, even though ecological systems theory would suggest that mental health resilience is better understood as multi-layered, i.e. relevant to, and impacted by, communities and broader societal and environmental contexts.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into an aspect of migrant mental health that has tended to be overlooked hitherto: the mental health resilience and positive mental health capacities of urban migrants. This is particularly relevant where professional “expert” mental health provision for internal migrant communities is absent or unaffordable. Previous work has tended to focus predominantly on mental health risk factors, despite growing awareness that focusing on risk factors along can lead to an over-reliance on top-down expert-led interventions and overlook positive capacities for mental health that are sometimes possessed by individuals and their communities.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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