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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Alan R. Peslak

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

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Abstract

Purpose

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The work begins with a literature review of the major studies performed on emotions and their affects on teams. This study then specifically surveys a group of information technology student teams at various stages of a term‐long project to determine their level of feelings in 15 separate emotions at each stage. Also measured are effects of emotions on attitudes towards team processes. Regression analysis was used to measure the significance of several hypotheses.

Findings

Overall findings specifically measured the five hypotheses. It was found that team emotions at the start of the project are more positive than negative. Negative emotions grow more than positive over the life of the project. Emotions show increased intensity over the life of the project. Initial emotions did not significantly affect overall team processes. Final emotions somewhat affected overall team processes.

Research limitations/applications

The small sample size does limit generalizations but the work can serve as a framework for more extensive and industry situated studies.

Practical implications

The work suggests issues related to the impact and evolution of emotions on team projects. Practitioners can begin to focus on efforts that can improve emotions and potentially overall team success.

Originality/value

There is little work done on the evolution of emotions and their effects on team processes. The paper begins the dialogue on an important aspect of team dynamics.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2022

Ayodeji E. Oke

Sustainable building development involves several stakeholders, team participants and their fulfilment can affect the performance and outcome of succeeding construction…

Abstract

Sustainable building development involves several stakeholders, team participants and their fulfilment can affect the performance and outcome of succeeding construction development. The effect of the individual or human component is one of the most desperate reasons for the realisation of any progress in the building sector. Organisations are developing an increasing number of project teams to meet diverse organisational goals as they acknowledge the value and importance of project teams. However, in order to ensure that the project team achieves positive results, management, particularly the project manager, must focus on crucial elements such as team satisfaction. Project success can be influenced by team satisfaction. The project leader usually oversees and manages the team, organising and managing project activities between stakeholders and other team members. The study found that gratitude, enhanced morale, increased responsibility, putting in extra effort and job quality are all reasons why team satisfaction might affect a construction project's success.

Details

Measures of Sustainable Construction Projects Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-998-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

David R. Moore and Andrew R.J. Dainty

Growing emphasis on meeting client needs and improving project performance within the construction industry has led to increasing use of fully integrated “design and…

4021

Abstract

Growing emphasis on meeting client needs and improving project performance within the construction industry has led to increasing use of fully integrated “design and build” (D&B) construction project teams. Advocates of the D&B system contend that integrating design and construction this way leads to a seamless procurement process, improved team relationships, and a more efficiently delivered product. This article reports on research which explored the operational efficiency of such integrated project teams. The findings suggest that despite the benefits of integration, cultural and professional interfaces remain which impair team performance and undermine structural change management protocols. This effectively leaves the team operating as work‐groups in a similar way as they would under a traditionally procured contract, with the construction team excluded from the change management process. A methodology is proposed for exploring these discontinuities in detail, and addressing intra‐work‐group conflicts which threaten the continued development of D&B within the sector.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Palitha Kuruppuarachchi

I was responsible for delivering a Radio Systems Development program. The program totalling over A$20 million was undertaken in the country NSW, Australia, over a…

4118

Abstract

Purpose

I was responsible for delivering a Radio Systems Development program. The program totalling over A$20 million was undertaken in the country NSW, Australia, over a three‐year time period, using the existing human resources of the NSW Police in a virtual team environment.

Design/methodology/approach

At the beginning of the program, a framework was provided for managing the program. The structure used in the program was a relatively unstructured one: informal communications was supported and project implementation was reliant on trust, cooperation and teamwork. Well‐proven project management and team management concepts were applied, some worked, but some didn’t.

Findings

The program was reviewed following its completion. Ideas from various stakeholders were sought and analysed in terms of: what went right and why, what went wrong and why, what could be done better, and any issues which may help on another project.

Originality/value

The program was reviewed following its completion. Ideas from various stakeholders were sought and analysed in terms of: what went right and why, what went wrong and why, what could be done better, and any issues which may help on another project.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Laura Gent, Arthur E. Parry and Mark E. Parry

The authors analyze surveys completed by 181 members of 59 project teams from 57 hospitals. Results indicate that members of high‐cooperation teams were more likely to…

1393

Abstract

The authors analyze surveys completed by 181 members of 59 project teams from 57 hospitals. Results indicate that members of high‐cooperation teams were more likely to communicate informally; spend time brainstorming, exchanging project‐related information, and receiving performance feedback; positively evaluate the status of their project; and have positive feelings about their participation on the project team. Cooperation levels were highest when team leaders clearly explained project objectives and team member responsibilities; team leaders confronted conflicts among team members and worked to resolve those conflicts; team members clearly understood project objectives, responsibilities, and rewards; and team members did not have reservations about the project and its outcomes. Results also suggested that, in some groups, active involvement by senior managers negatively affected cooperation levels. This result may reflect a deference in some groups to the authority of senior management.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Marla Hacker

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most…

2757

Abstract

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most often hypothesized to influence team performance. To date, though, we still do not really understand why some teams perform better than other teams. Studies have provided mixed findings and inconclusive results. The study described in this article continues the search for variables that influence project team performance. The findings provide support for an increasingly, albeit controversial, discussion occurring within human resource circles, concerning the impact of top performers on team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Mathew B. Smith

Two issues which confront today’s managers are diversity and teams. The contradictory nature of these two terms, in the form of a diverse team, makes it appropriate that…

2839

Abstract

Two issues which confront today’s managers are diversity and teams. The contradictory nature of these two terms, in the form of a diverse team, makes it appropriate that the role of many traditional project management tools and techniques be examined. This article describes how the leadership of a diverse team was able to successfully accomplish a major project on time and under budget. They used traditional project management tools and techniques but modified them to fit the requirements of the team. One primary area for focus was on identifying behaviors all team members should exhibit in order to for the project to be successful. After the behaviors were identified, applied behavior analysis was used to reinforce the desired behaviors. By focusing on behaviors which built trust and encouraged open communications, the team was able to take advantage of the diverse experience and backgrounds of all team members. This allowed the team to push decision making well down into the organization, motivate all team members around the objectives of the project and develop flexible processes which were enhanced as the project moved forward. This article attempts to describe and explain the major lessons the team felt they learned for this project.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Ali E. Akgün, Gary S. Lynn and John C. Byrne

The authors report on their findings from an ongoing seven‐year research project on the intersection of entrepreneurship, marketing and technology. The focus of their…

2044

Abstract

The authors report on their findings from an ongoing seven‐year research project on the intersection of entrepreneurship, marketing and technology. The focus of their research is to identify factors that lead to better, faster and less expensive new product and service development. The present study investigates new product development practices in high‐technology small‐to‐medium enterprises (SMEs), including electronics and computer, biotechnology, military software, space, and electronic machinery companies. Gathering data from 60 new product development projects, the authors found that successful project teams perform certain practices better than unsuccessful ones. These include project visioning, process proficiency, management support, documentation systems, established project deadlines, team processes, and communication. Further, the authors identified critical success factors in the new product development projects as process proficiency, effective filing system, an established project deadline, information coding, and reduced formal communication within teams.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Rajesh Singh and Lindsay Jankovitz

This chapter makes the case for imparting effective project management training and collaborative skills for information professionals. The authors identify the challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter makes the case for imparting effective project management training and collaborative skills for information professionals. The authors identify the challenges of collaborative project work in online environments by reviewing the relevant project management literature within the library and information science (LIS) discipline and discussing the role of LIS schools in addressing project management and collaborative skills for information professionals.

Findings

The literature review revealed a significant lack of project management and collaborative skills among LIS professionals. However, most LIS schools are still falling short when it comes to offering project management courses on a regular basis. The authors examined the challenges of teamwork in online environments, identified project management strategies and approaches for successful teamwork, and proposed guidelines for strategic project management education for information professionals. It is recommended that information professionals should have the skills to prepare a team contract, develop a project schedule, create mechanisms for transparency and accountability, and use effective communication strategies through project management techniques.

Methodology/approach

In addition to reviewing the relevant literature on project management within LIS, and the challenges of teamwork in online environments, the authors analyzed the relevance of some collaborative concepts and frameworks that might be useful in managing collaborative projects. In particular, the implications of Tuckman’s (1965) team progression theory, lessons from Harvey’s (1988) Abilene paradox, and de Bono’s (1989) six thinking hats method were analyzed and discussed in managing collaborative projects.

Social implications

By obtaining effective project management and collaborative skills, LIS professionals will be able to better meet the demands of contemporary libraries and information organizations.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Pamella R. Lach and Brian Rosenblum

In the spring of 2016, the University of Kansas Libraries piloted Research Sprints: One Week, One Project, a program aimed at cultivating relationships with faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

In the spring of 2016, the University of Kansas Libraries piloted Research Sprints: One Week, One Project, a program aimed at cultivating relationships with faculty through deep project-based engagement.

Methodology/approach

Three faculty members, matched with a team of library experts, worked intensively to complete a research or pedagogic project for one week in May. Critical to the program’s success was the use of project management methodologies and tools. These tools were essential to identifying task dependencies, developing workflows, and documenting work processes.

Findings

The overall success of the Sprints demonstrated to faculty that library staff can be more than one-shot consultants; faculty collaborators learned first hand that the library can be a true partner throughout the scholarly process. As an approach to user engagement, Sprints pose some considerations for library management, including the need for robust staff training in project management and teambuilding, internal resistance to utilizing project management tools, difficulty finding staff time and resources to commit for a short but high-concentrated period, and the need to align projects with staff expertise and availability.

Originality/value

This chapter provides an assessment of the Sprints pilot, addressing some of the implications, potential benefits, and challenges of adopting and adapting Research Sprints to support library work. It will be of interest to project managers and library staff who are considering integrating project management methods into their outreach and services, and provides examples of how project management can inform library efforts to more deeply collaborate in advancing the scholarly work of local research and teaching communities.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

Keywords

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