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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Alan R. Peslak

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

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4884

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The work begins with a literature review of the major studies performed on emotions and their affects on teams. This study then specifically surveys a group of information technology student teams at various stages of a term‐long project to determine their level of feelings in 15 separate emotions at each stage. Also measured are effects of emotions on attitudes towards team processes. Regression analysis was used to measure the significance of several hypotheses.

Findings

Overall findings specifically measured the five hypotheses. It was found that team emotions at the start of the project are more positive than negative. Negative emotions grow more than positive over the life of the project. Emotions show increased intensity over the life of the project. Initial emotions did not significantly affect overall team processes. Final emotions somewhat affected overall team processes.

Research limitations/applications

The small sample size does limit generalizations but the work can serve as a framework for more extensive and industry situated studies.

Practical implications

The work suggests issues related to the impact and evolution of emotions on team projects. Practitioners can begin to focus on efforts that can improve emotions and potentially overall team success.

Originality/value

There is little work done on the evolution of emotions and their effects on team processes. The paper begins the dialogue on an important aspect of team dynamics.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

David R. Moore and Andrew R.J. Dainty

Growing emphasis on meeting client needs and improving project performance within the construction industry has led to increasing use of fully integrated “design and…

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3899

Abstract

Growing emphasis on meeting client needs and improving project performance within the construction industry has led to increasing use of fully integrated “design and build” (D&B) construction project teams. Advocates of the D&B system contend that integrating design and construction this way leads to a seamless procurement process, improved team relationships, and a more efficiently delivered product. This article reports on research which explored the operational efficiency of such integrated project teams. The findings suggest that despite the benefits of integration, cultural and professional interfaces remain which impair team performance and undermine structural change management protocols. This effectively leaves the team operating as work‐groups in a similar way as they would under a traditionally procured contract, with the construction team excluded from the change management process. A methodology is proposed for exploring these discontinuities in detail, and addressing intra‐work‐group conflicts which threaten the continued development of D&B within the sector.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Palitha Kuruppuarachchi

I was responsible for delivering a Radio Systems Development program. The program totalling over A$20 million was undertaken in the country NSW, Australia, over a…

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3993

Abstract

Purpose

I was responsible for delivering a Radio Systems Development program. The program totalling over A$20 million was undertaken in the country NSW, Australia, over a three‐year time period, using the existing human resources of the NSW Police in a virtual team environment.

Design/methodology/approach

At the beginning of the program, a framework was provided for managing the program. The structure used in the program was a relatively unstructured one: informal communications was supported and project implementation was reliant on trust, cooperation and teamwork. Well‐proven project management and team management concepts were applied, some worked, but some didn’t.

Findings

The program was reviewed following its completion. Ideas from various stakeholders were sought and analysed in terms of: what went right and why, what went wrong and why, what could be done better, and any issues which may help on another project.

Originality/value

The program was reviewed following its completion. Ideas from various stakeholders were sought and analysed in terms of: what went right and why, what went wrong and why, what could be done better, and any issues which may help on another project.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Laura Gent, Arthur E. Parry and Mark E. Parry

The authors analyze surveys completed by 181 members of 59 project teams from 57 hospitals. Results indicate that members of high‐cooperation teams were more likely to…

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1382

Abstract

The authors analyze surveys completed by 181 members of 59 project teams from 57 hospitals. Results indicate that members of high‐cooperation teams were more likely to communicate informally; spend time brainstorming, exchanging project‐related information, and receiving performance feedback; positively evaluate the status of their project; and have positive feelings about their participation on the project team. Cooperation levels were highest when team leaders clearly explained project objectives and team member responsibilities; team leaders confronted conflicts among team members and worked to resolve those conflicts; team members clearly understood project objectives, responsibilities, and rewards; and team members did not have reservations about the project and its outcomes. Results also suggested that, in some groups, active involvement by senior managers negatively affected cooperation levels. This result may reflect a deference in some groups to the authority of senior management.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Marla Hacker

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most…

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2705

Abstract

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most often hypothesized to influence team performance. To date, though, we still do not really understand why some teams perform better than other teams. Studies have provided mixed findings and inconclusive results. The study described in this article continues the search for variables that influence project team performance. The findings provide support for an increasingly, albeit controversial, discussion occurring within human resource circles, concerning the impact of top performers on team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Mathew B. Smith

Two issues which confront today’s managers are diversity and teams. The contradictory nature of these two terms, in the form of a diverse team, makes it appropriate that…

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2801

Abstract

Two issues which confront today’s managers are diversity and teams. The contradictory nature of these two terms, in the form of a diverse team, makes it appropriate that the role of many traditional project management tools and techniques be examined. This article describes how the leadership of a diverse team was able to successfully accomplish a major project on time and under budget. They used traditional project management tools and techniques but modified them to fit the requirements of the team. One primary area for focus was on identifying behaviors all team members should exhibit in order to for the project to be successful. After the behaviors were identified, applied behavior analysis was used to reinforce the desired behaviors. By focusing on behaviors which built trust and encouraged open communications, the team was able to take advantage of the diverse experience and backgrounds of all team members. This allowed the team to push decision making well down into the organization, motivate all team members around the objectives of the project and develop flexible processes which were enhanced as the project moved forward. This article attempts to describe and explain the major lessons the team felt they learned for this project.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Ali E. Akgün, Gary S. Lynn and John C. Byrne

The authors report on their findings from an ongoing seven‐year research project on the intersection of entrepreneurship, marketing and technology. The focus of their…

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1993

Abstract

The authors report on their findings from an ongoing seven‐year research project on the intersection of entrepreneurship, marketing and technology. The focus of their research is to identify factors that lead to better, faster and less expensive new product and service development. The present study investigates new product development practices in high‐technology small‐to‐medium enterprises (SMEs), including electronics and computer, biotechnology, military software, space, and electronic machinery companies. Gathering data from 60 new product development projects, the authors found that successful project teams perform certain practices better than unsuccessful ones. These include project visioning, process proficiency, management support, documentation systems, established project deadlines, team processes, and communication. Further, the authors identified critical success factors in the new product development projects as process proficiency, effective filing system, an established project deadline, information coding, and reduced formal communication within teams.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Andy Susilo Lukito-Budi, Nurul Indarti and Kusdhianto Setiawan

This study investigates the development of absorptive capacity. Using an integrated cognitive learning perspective, this study provides empirical evidence about the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the development of absorptive capacity. Using an integrated cognitive learning perspective, this study provides empirical evidence about the conceptual absorptive capacity model through examining the full process step by step. Two groups of moderating variables were studied—namely, social integration and appropriability—to examine their impact on the process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a longitudinal study from a community service program (Kuliah Kerja Nyata) at Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, by using surveys at the beginning and the end of the project. Of 492 teams from 2,444 students participated in the study. Each individual within a team had at least one project assigned to him/her during the project. The absorptive capacity process was examined through six consecutive models and analysed using hierarchical linear modelling. The moderating variables were tested using the Moderated Regression Analysis and Wald tests.

Findings

The study confirms the full cycle of absorptive capacity as an independent, dynamic and complex process; it involves acquiring, assimilating, transforming and exploiting sequencing variables from the individual level to the team level and vice versa using feed-forward and feedback mechanisms adopted from the 4I framework of organisational learning. However, the roles of the moderating variables are still inconclusive due to some possible factors, which were also reflected by the U-phenomenon.

Originality/value

This study provides vital support to the learning theory as well as to the organisation learning concept. This study also reveals empirical evidence about the unsupported moderating variables behave during a project cycle, such as what they function, how they evolve and what we should do about the moderating factors during a project. The findings of this study provide practical suggestions and highlight areas for future research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Farshid Rahmani, Christina Scott-Young, Allen Tadayon and Jacobus Daniel van der Walt

The aim of this study is to broaden the understanding of the set of knowledge, skills, attributes and experience (KSAE) that teams should demonstrate and the necessary…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to broaden the understanding of the set of knowledge, skills, attributes and experience (KSAE) that teams should demonstrate and the necessary roles they need to play within the team in Relational Contracting (RC). This research seeks to answer three questions: first, what KSAEs are required in a team operating under RC, second, which of the identified KSAEs are more important to enable an integrated team to perform effectively and third, how do these required KSAEs correspond to the major role clusters identified in Belbin’s team role model?

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with 25 experts and key management representatives in infrastructure construction in Australia were conducted to enable detailed discussion of the research questions.

Findings

Sixteen behavioural traits and four knowledge and experience areas were identified. The findings highlight that in RC, team members and especially leaders and managers need to be competent in people-oriented roles, above all others.

Research limitations/implications

This research mainly captured the perspectives of personnel working in state government infrastructure departments. Further research is recommended to explore the perceptions of employees in private construction companies.

Practical implications

By aligning the roles required for RC with the team role clusters of the Belbin’s team roles assessment tool, this study will be useful for identifying suitable members to form high-performance project teams.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper can inform government infrastructure organisations and construction companies as to which roles are more critical when selecting fit-for-purpose teams to successfully deliver large infrastructure projects procured under the RC method.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Rajesh Singh and Lindsay Jankovitz

This chapter makes the case for imparting effective project management training and collaborative skills for information professionals. The authors identify the challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter makes the case for imparting effective project management training and collaborative skills for information professionals. The authors identify the challenges of collaborative project work in online environments by reviewing the relevant project management literature within the library and information science (LIS) discipline and discussing the role of LIS schools in addressing project management and collaborative skills for information professionals.

Findings

The literature review revealed a significant lack of project management and collaborative skills among LIS professionals. However, most LIS schools are still falling short when it comes to offering project management courses on a regular basis. The authors examined the challenges of teamwork in online environments, identified project management strategies and approaches for successful teamwork, and proposed guidelines for strategic project management education for information professionals. It is recommended that information professionals should have the skills to prepare a team contract, develop a project schedule, create mechanisms for transparency and accountability, and use effective communication strategies through project management techniques.

Methodology/approach

In addition to reviewing the relevant literature on project management within LIS, and the challenges of teamwork in online environments, the authors analyzed the relevance of some collaborative concepts and frameworks that might be useful in managing collaborative projects. In particular, the implications of Tuckman’s (1965) team progression theory, lessons from Harvey’s (1988) Abilene paradox, and de Bono’s (1989) six thinking hats method were analyzed and discussed in managing collaborative projects.

Social implications

By obtaining effective project management and collaborative skills, LIS professionals will be able to better meet the demands of contemporary libraries and information organizations.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

Keywords

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