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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Gary B. Brumback

In a team‐based organization, the performance not only of the teams as a whole but also of their individual members needs to be managed and managed very well if tall…

17202

Abstract

In a team‐based organization, the performance not only of the teams as a whole but also of their individual members needs to be managed and managed very well if tall performance (consistently competent, ethical, and motivated behavior that always produces the best results) is to be reached and sustained. In this article, four principles are first overviewed that underlie a new model of performance management designed by the author. The principles are those of tall performance, accountability, responsible empowerment, and performance management. An overview of the new model is then given. Among the model’s salient features are the way it preserves the “we” without sacrificing the “me”, a non‐traditional way to do performance appraisals, and accountability not only for results but also for behaviors, including ethical conduct.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

This paper aims to examine the influence of shared leadership on team performance in terms of quantity and quality and in addition the moderating effect of task complexity…

974

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of shared leadership on team performance in terms of quantity and quality and in addition the moderating effect of task complexity on this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered from 26 teams of students from a major university in Germany who completed a laboratory team decision-making exercise.

Findings

The results suggest that teams sharing leadership showed better team performance and made fewer errors. They achieved higher levels of quality of performance. In addition, if the team members viewed the task as highly complex then the quality of their performance was increased.

Practical implications

Therefore for organizations to optimize team performance shared leadership should be promoted, the SNA should be used to develop interventions and training and influencing perceptions of task complexity should be considered as an important strategy to stimulate shared leadership in teams.

Originality/value

This paper has an original approach by testing for the first time how perceived task complexity moderates the relationship between shared leadership and team performance and by developing an original team task to investigate shared leadership.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Marla Hacker

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most…

2770

Abstract

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most often hypothesized to influence team performance. To date, though, we still do not really understand why some teams perform better than other teams. Studies have provided mixed findings and inconclusive results. The study described in this article continues the search for variables that influence project team performance. The findings provide support for an increasingly, albeit controversial, discussion occurring within human resource circles, concerning the impact of top performers on team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Jonas Debrulle, Johan Maes and Elliroma Gardiner

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understanding the impact of entrepreneurial team composition on new venture performance. Different types of entrepreneurship…

824

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understanding the impact of entrepreneurial team composition on new venture performance. Different types of entrepreneurship motivation among founding team members are defined. Using a relatively recent theory as a framework (i.e. self-determination theory), the authors group these motives into two categories: autonomous and controlled motivation. The business impact of the level of each type of motivation within the team, as well as the impact of having team members with different motivational drivers, is examined. New venture performance is modelled in two different ways: financial performance (i.e. return on assets) and innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The analyses are based on 66 founding teams active in diverse activity sectors. The teams represent a total of 142 business founders. Data was collected through structured interviews, a company questionnaire and a secondary data source (i.e. certified financial statements).

Findings

The results confirm that the level of autonomous motivation within the team contributes to start-up financial performance, whereas the level of controlled motivation hampers innovation performance. No direct effects of diversity of team member motivation on start-up performance were discovered.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to study multiple firm performance effects of the composition of entrepreneurial founding teams in terms of motivation.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Petru L. Curşeu

1555

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2023

Samia Jamshed and Nauman Majeed

Research unveiled that interdisciplinary health-care teams are often found to be ineffective because of deprived team mechanisms. Considering effective team functioning, a…

37

Abstract

Purpose

Research unveiled that interdisciplinary health-care teams are often found to be ineffective because of deprived team mechanisms. Considering effective team functioning, a leader’s non-cognitive abilities, knowledge-sharing behavior and the role of culture remain central concerns of health-care teams. This study aims to investigate how a leader’s emotional intelligence (EI) in a prevailing team culture can nurture the sharing of knowledge and enhance team EI that influences team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used multisource data representing a sample of 195 teams (735 respondents) to examine the hypothesized relationships by using the analytic strategy of partial least squares-structural equation modeling. This study bridged the methodological gap by using the repeated indicator approach that includes the reflective-formative second-order hierarchical latent variable model.

Findings

The results revealed a standpoint that leaders practicing the ability of EI influences team performance by understanding each other emotions in the leader–member relationship. Further, culture adds value and maps knowledge-sharing behavior which is tailored and beneficial for effective team outcomes.

Practical implications

This study provides valuable inputs by articulating uniquely modeled variables for health-care teams confronting high work demands. This study highlights that leaders' EI can enhance understanding of the emotions of the team and can exchange information by harnessing knowledge-sharing behavior amongst professionals.

Originality/value

This study provides a novel contribution by integrating leaders’ EI, knowledge-sharing behavior, the role of culture and team performance in a single framework. The integrated theoretical model sheds light on team working in the health-care setting and advances the understanding of a leader’s EI and team culture through mapping knowledge sharing particularly being central to enhancing team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 December 2022

Nathan Byrne and Erik Eddy

Organizations are increasingly using team-based work structures to solve complex challenges and issues. Such teams require team members to have shared cognitions – a…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations are increasingly using team-based work structures to solve complex challenges and issues. Such teams require team members to have shared cognitions – a shared, accurate and complimentary understanding of team processes – to enhance team performance. The purpose of the current research is to explore the impact of shared cognitions on team processes and team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The current research focused on shared cognitions of teammate knowledge and expertise while working in a team environment. Using an experimental design with 20 teams collaborating on six problem-solving questions, the authors test hypotheses pertaining to the relationship between shared cognitions about team member expertise and team processes and team performance.

Findings

Analysis of variance finds that teams with a greater level of shared cognitions of team member expertise have enhanced team process and greater team performance than teams without shared cognitions.

Originality/value

Recommendations are made for future research and practice based on such findings. The authors discuss ways in which the findings of this study can contribute to greater team process and performance in schools, organizations and athletic teams, noting the additional ability to apply such findings in virtual settings.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Marketa Rickley and Madelynn Stackhouse

The field of global leadership has flourished and advanced in the preceding decade. However, in contrast to the term global leadership, which enjoys conceptual clarity…

Abstract

The field of global leadership has flourished and advanced in the preceding decade. However, in contrast to the term global leadership, which enjoys conceptual clarity enabling accumulative progress, the construct of global leadership effectiveness is comparatively undertheorized, with instances of definitional ambiguity and disjointed methodological operationalizations across studies. The purpose of this chapter is, thus, to provide a systematic review of the global leadership effectiveness literature. In doing so, our contributions are fourfold. First, we offer an inclusive, comprehensive definition of global leadership effectiveness. Second, we map its construct domain. Third, we review research findings at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Finally, we integrate extant insights and offer suggestions for future research, organized within the typology of the content domain along the identified dimensions of global leadership effectiveness. Together, our goal is to build a foundation for future research examining the roles of leadership and the global context as antecedents of global leadership effectiveness.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-838-8

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Trevor N. Fry, Kyi Phyu Nyein and Jessica L. Wildman

Theories of trust imply that team trust develops and grows over time, yet relatively few researchers have taken on the challenge of studying team trust in longitudinal…

Abstract

Purpose

Theories of trust imply that team trust develops and grows over time, yet relatively few researchers have taken on the challenge of studying team trust in longitudinal research designs. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a concise summary of the existing literature on team trust over time, and to offer a conceptual model of team-level trust development over time to aid future research on this topic.

Methodology/approach

We draw from the Input–Mediator–Output–Input (IMOI) framework, as well as previous multilevel models of organizational trust development, and published findings from longitudinal team trust studies.

Findings

Taking a temporal perspective, we consider how team-level mediators and outcomes can both predict and be predicted by team trust trajectories and feedback loops over time, as well as how those relationships with team trust might change based on the existence of other moderating variables including trust violation and repair.

Research implications

Future longitudinal team research may use the model as a starting point for investigating the antecedents, as well as the team processes and dynamic emergent states, that can effectively predict trajectories of team trust across various stages of teamwork.

Practical implications

Based on our review of extant literature, we provide several recommendations for training and organizational intervention including the importance of management’s consideration of team-level trust in providing feedback, enhancing cohesion, and mitigating conflict.

Originality/value

We provide insight into the development of team trust trajectories and offer a framework to help guide future longitudinal team trust research.

Details

Team Dynamics Over Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-403-7

Keywords

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