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Article

Edgardo Buscaglia and José‐Luis Guerrero‐Cusumano

Establishes a method aimed at defining procedural delays. The time delay in the procedural life of a case under any legal system has been considered as one of the main…

Abstract

Establishes a method aimed at defining procedural delays. The time delay in the procedural life of a case under any legal system has been considered as one of the main sources of direct costs and uncertainty for businesses once litigation starts. Yet, no methodology exists until now which is able to develop benchmarks that would define expected procedural time under controlled court conditions. Finds the main court and user‐related factors associated to the times disposition in bankruptcy cases within the first instance level and determines an “ideal” time to disposition within a quality control framework. Considers an applied case using data belonging to the commercial first instance courts in Argentina. The results of the analysis conclude that the economic resources devoted to court personnel, not to capital spending, and an active case management style applied by a judge reduce the median procedural times.

Details

Benchmarking for Quality Management & Technology, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1351-3036

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Article

Nace R. Magner, Robert B. Welker and Gary G. Johnson

This study examined, in an organizational budgeting context, several important psychological processes surrounding procedural justice. Specifically, the study tested a…

Abstract

This study examined, in an organizational budgeting context, several important psychological processes surrounding procedural justice. Specifically, the study tested a causal model in which voice has value‐expressive and control‐mediated effects on procedural justice, and procedural justice has positive effects on organizational commitment. Data were gathered with a survey of production workers (N = 157) and analyzed with a latent variable structural equation model. The results supported control‐mediated voice effects on procedural justice and procedural justice effects on organizational commitment, but failed to confirm value‐expressive voice effects. Based on the findings, we argue that value‐expressive voice effects may be less prevalent than previous research has suggested.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Zhe Zhang and Ming Jia

The paper aims to extend research on public‐private partnerships (PPP) by exploring the path toward procedural justice and cooperation performance through contracts.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to extend research on public‐private partnerships (PPP) by exploring the path toward procedural justice and cooperation performance through contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses equity theory to address inter‐partner cooperation in PPPs. The paper emphasizes how procedural fairness, as perceived by partners in a PPP, influences cooperation effects. Using both social exchange theory and transaction cost theory, it hypothesizes that procedural fairness improves cooperation effects by enhancing two kinds of contracts: the control‐formal contract and the informal contract.

Findings

The regression analysis suggests that procedural fairness indirectly affects three kinds of cooperation effects – direct effects, knowledge‐created effects, and social effects – by increasing formal and informal contracts.

Research limitations/implications

Further research might address the antecedents of procedural justice.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that procedural justice is important to PPPs and that contracts mediate this relationship.

Originality/value

The paper enriches PPP research, especially with regard to procedural formalization, contracts, and cooperation performance.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Clair White, Michael Hogan, Tara Shelley and N. Prabha Unnithan

There are a number of individual and contextual variables that influence public opinion of the police but we know little about the public opinion regarding state law…

Abstract

Purpose

There are a number of individual and contextual variables that influence public opinion of the police but we know little about the public opinion regarding state law enforcement agencies. Prior studies involving municipal police and other criminal justice agencies indicate that the perceptions of procedural justice, or fair treatment, are important predictors of citizen satisfaction with police services. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether individuals who perceive procedurally just treatment during their contact with a state patrol officer improve the levels of satisfaction with the state patrol.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of a public opinion study (n=846) regarding the Colorado State Patrol conducted in 2009. A subsample of 393 individuals who had contact with the state patrol and were further surveyed about their contact with the officer. Logistic regression models were used to examine individual- and contextual-level variables influence satisfaction with the state patrol and whether this relationship was mediated by the perceptions of procedural justice.

Findings

The authors found that individuals who perceive higher levels of procedural justice expressed higher satisfaction with the state patrol. Females, older respondents, and non-white respondents expressed greater satisfaction, as well as those who had voluntary contact or were not arrested. More importantly, procedural justice mediated the effect of involuntary contact and arrest on levels of satisfaction, and while non-white respondents were less likely to experience procedural justice, when levels of procedural justice are controlled for, they have higher levels of satisfaction.

Originality/value

The findings emphasize the significance of citizen perceptions of procedural justice during contacts with members of the state patrol. The current study contributes to our knowledge of procedural justice and citizen satisfaction with police encounters given previous research on citizen satisfaction with police focuses almost exclusively on local-level agencies, and research on procedural justice asks the respondents almost exclusively about the police in general.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article

Nina D. Cole and Douglas H. Flint

The self‐interest and relational models of organizational justice were tested to explain the relationship between benefit plan type and organizational justice. Benefit…

Abstract

The self‐interest and relational models of organizational justice were tested to explain the relationship between benefit plan type and organizational justice. Benefit plan types considered were flexible and traditional plans. In support of the self‐interest model employees in flexible benefit plans had significantly higher perceptions of procedural justice than employees in traditional benefit plans. There were no significant differences in perceptions of distributive justice between the plan types.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part

Chong M. Lau and Sharon L.C. Tan

This study revisits the area of reliance on budget to evaluate employee performance. It contributes in several ways. First, it updates this traditional research area…

Abstract

This study revisits the area of reliance on budget to evaluate employee performance. It contributes in several ways. First, it updates this traditional research area making it more relevant to the current debate on the use of financial vis-à-vis nonfinancial measures in multidimensional performance measurement systems. Second, it examines the relationship between reliance on budget and budgetary participation in a manner that is different from that used by prior studies. Instead of treating budgetary participation as a moderating variable, the study examines it as a mediating variable. Specifically, the study hypothesizes that reliance on budget as performance measures affects the extent of employee budgetary participation. Third, it incorporates the recent interest by management accounting researchers in organizational fairness into this research area. It hypothesizes that budgetary participation affects the extent of employees’ perceptions of procedural fairness, which, in turn, influences employee job satisfaction and performance. The structural equation modeling results based on a sample of 152 managers indicate that the use of budget targets for performance evaluation is positively associated with employee job satisfaction and performance. However, much of these effects are indirect via (1) budgetary participation and (2) procedural fairness.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-754-3

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Article

Tarek El Masri, Matthäus Tekathen, Michel Magnan and Emilio Boulianne

Family firms possess dual identities, being the family and the business, which can be segmented and integrated to various degrees. This study examines whether and how…

Abstract

Purpose

Family firms possess dual identities, being the family and the business, which can be segmented and integrated to various degrees. This study examines whether and how management control technologies are calibrated to fit into the dual identities of family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of 20 family firms was conducted using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with owner-managers, drawings of mental maps and publicly available information. The notion of calibration was developed and used, with its three components of graduation, purpose and reference, as an organizing device for the interpretive understanding of the management control usage and its relation to family firms’ dual identities.

Findings

The study finds that the use of calculative, family-centric and procedural management controls – in sum the pervasive use of management control technologies – are associated with a professionalization of the family firm, a foregrounding of the business identity and a reduction of the disadvantageous side of familiness. In comparison, the pragmatic and minimal use of management control technologies are found to be associated with an emphasis on family identity. It transpires as liberating, engendering trust and unfolding a familial environment.

Research limitations/implications

Because results are derived from a qualitative approach, they are not generalizable at an empirical level. By showing how the use of management control technologies is calibrated with reference to family firms’ dual identities, the paper reveals the perceived potency of control technologies to affect the identity of firms.

Practical implications

The study reveals how family firms perceive management control technologies as strengthening their business identity while weakening their family identity. Thereby, this study provides an account of how management control technologies are expected to change the identity of firms.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the management control and family business literatures because it uncovers how management control technologies are calibrated in reference to family firms’ dual identities. It shows that calculative, family-centric and procedural management controls are used to professionalize the firm and strengthen its business identity as well as to reduce the negative effects of the family identity. The paper also illustrates how the liberating force of using pragmatic and minimal control technologies can serve to give prominence to the family identity.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article

Richard A. Posthuma and James B. Dworkin

Much of the prior literature on arbitrator acceptability is focused primarily on demographic characteristics of arbitrators and parties. This article draws from several…

Abstract

Much of the prior literature on arbitrator acceptability is focused primarily on demographic characteristics of arbitrators and parties. This article draws from several behavioral theories to build a single conceptual model of arbitrator acceptability. Key concepts from the theory of planned behavior, control theory, organizational justice theories, and the decision making literature are integrated into a single framework that enhances our understanding of this topic and provides useful directions for future research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Tina Nabatchi, Lisa Blomgren Bingham and David H. Good

This study examines the structure and dimensionality of organizational justice in a workplace mediation setting. It has three purposes: to determine whether the procedural

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the structure and dimensionality of organizational justice in a workplace mediation setting. It has three purposes: to determine whether the procedural and interpersonal justice factors in the four‐factor model of organizational justice can be split, thereby providing support for a six‐factor model; to identify how the split factors relate to other factors in the model; and to uncover any differences in employee and supervisor perceptions of organizational justice in workplace mediation.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analysis is used to explore the fit of four different models of organizational justice. The paper examines cross factor correlations to assess the strength and relationships among factors and to look for differences between employees and supervisors.

Findings

It is found that a six‐factor model of organizational justice provides the best fit for the data and that factor relationships differ little for employees and supervisors.

Research limitations/implications

This is a field test of REDRESS®, the USPS employment mediation program which uses transformative mediation. The study has important theoretical and research implications for organizational justice and workplace mediation.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications for organizational conflict management and dispute system design.

Originality/value

Organizational justice has not been adequately explored within the context of workplace mediation. The study is unique in that it concurrently examines multiple factors of organizational justice, using a large, longitudinal dataset from an internationally recognized workplace mediation program.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Rossouw von Solms

Information technology (IT) has become part and parcel of the business world today. In fact, it will continue to become an even larger factor in the future. Organizations…

Abstract

Information technology (IT) has become part and parcel of the business world today. In fact, it will continue to become an even larger factor in the future. Organizations will interlink their IT systems as a result of linking to the Internet, electronic data interchange (EDI), electronic funds transfer at point of sale (EFTPoS), etc. All of this might hold an information security risk for an organization. Organizations attempt to secure their own IT environment, but they have little control over the IT systems they link with. If those external IT environments are insecure, they might pose a threat to the IT systems in the host environment. Organizations would like to obtain some proof that the IT systems of their business partners are secure before they link with their individual systems. Such a proof can only be given through some security evaluation and certification process. Shows and explains the need for such a process.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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