Search results

1 – 10 of over 18000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Manuel Alonso Dos Santos, Orlando Llanos Contreras, Ferran Calabuig Moreno and Jose Augusto Felicio

This paper investigates the influence of firms' communication in terms of family firm identity and country-of-origin on consumer response.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the influence of firms' communication in terms of family firm identity and country-of-origin on consumer response.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-supplied online experiment in Chile and Spain is employed using as dependent variables brand trust and intention to buy. The experiment includes the following factors: family firm identity (family vs non-family), country of origin (national vs foreign) and as a manipulation check (type of product: hedonic vs utilitarian).

Findings

The results indicate that communicating the family firm identity increases brand trust and purchase intention. Consumers show higher scores on trust and purchase intention when exposed to national country of origin products. The effect of the variability on the dependent variables is greater when the family firm identity is communicated. Trust and purchase intention are different in Chilean and Spanish consumers when the family firm identity is combined with a national country of origin cue.

Originality/value

This article contributes to family business theory by exploring how to capitalize on the family firm identity component in brand communication. It also contributes to the theory of corporate brand identity by proposing a communication model oriented toward consumer behavior. It also examines firms' communication (family firm identity and country-of-origin) on consumer.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Tarek El Masri, Matthäus Tekathen, Michel Magnan and Emilio Boulianne

Family firms possess dual identities, being the family and the business, which can be segmented and integrated to various degrees. This study examines whether and how…

Abstract

Purpose

Family firms possess dual identities, being the family and the business, which can be segmented and integrated to various degrees. This study examines whether and how management control technologies are calibrated to fit into the dual identities of family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of 20 family firms was conducted using semi-structured, in-depth interviews with owner-managers, drawings of mental maps and publicly available information. The notion of calibration was developed and used, with its three components of graduation, purpose and reference, as an organizing device for the interpretive understanding of the management control usage and its relation to family firms’ dual identities.

Findings

The study finds that the use of calculative, family-centric and procedural management controls – in sum the pervasive use of management control technologies – are associated with a professionalization of the family firm, a foregrounding of the business identity and a reduction of the disadvantageous side of familiness. In comparison, the pragmatic and minimal use of management control technologies are found to be associated with an emphasis on family identity. It transpires as liberating, engendering trust and unfolding a familial environment.

Research limitations/implications

Because results are derived from a qualitative approach, they are not generalizable at an empirical level. By showing how the use of management control technologies is calibrated with reference to family firms’ dual identities, the paper reveals the perceived potency of control technologies to affect the identity of firms.

Practical implications

The study reveals how family firms perceive management control technologies as strengthening their business identity while weakening their family identity. Thereby, this study provides an account of how management control technologies are expected to change the identity of firms.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the management control and family business literatures because it uncovers how management control technologies are calibrated in reference to family firms’ dual identities. It shows that calculative, family-centric and procedural management controls are used to professionalize the firm and strengthen its business identity as well as to reduce the negative effects of the family identity. The paper also illustrates how the liberating force of using pragmatic and minimal control technologies can serve to give prominence to the family identity.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Anyuan Shen and Surinder Tikoo

This study aims to examine the relationship between family business identity disclosure by firms and consumer product evaluations and the moderating impact, if any, of firm

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between family business identity disclosure by firms and consumer product evaluations and the moderating impact, if any, of firm size on this relationship. Toward this end, the study seeks to develop a theoretical explanation for how consumers process family business identity information.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative pre-study was conducted to obtain preliminary evidence that consumers’ perceptions of family businesses originate from both family- and business-based category beliefs. A product evaluation experiment, involving young adult subjects, was used to test the research hypotheses, and the experiment data were analyzed using MANOVA.

Findings

The key finding was that the effect of family business identity disclosure on consumer product evaluations is moderated by firm size.

Practical implications

This research has implications for businesses seeking to promote their family business identity in branding communications.

Originality/value

This research provides a theoretical account of why consumers might hold different perceptions of family business brands. The interactive effect of firm size and family business identity information disclosure on consumer product evaluations contributes new insight to family business branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2017

Andrea Calabrò, Giovanna Campopiano and Rodrigo Basco

Drawing on the principal-principal conflict and identity literatures, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the Agency Problem Type II-bis in the context of family

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the principal-principal conflict and identity literatures, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the Agency Problem Type II-bis in the context of family business. Specifically, the authors hypothesize that the size of the family owner group is related to firm growth and that this relationship is moderated by the extent to which the family identifies with the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested on a sample of 265 medium and large German family firms (FFs) via moderated hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The main findings suggest that business family identity moderates the inverted U-shaped relationship between the size of the family owner group and firm growth in such a way that FFs with medium-sized family owner groups and high levels of business family identity reach higher firm growth.

Practical implications

In the context of FFs fully owned by one family, family owners might have different strategic preferences, goals, and identities, thus potentially making them subject to the conflict that could arise among the different family owners in relation to growth expectations. Recognizing this problem could help family owners find potential solutions to ensure the well-being of both the family and the business.

Originality/value

The combination of family ownership structure and family ownership dynamics affects firm growth. Challenging the homogeneity of the family owner group, the authors highlight the role of Agency Problem Type II-bis in hindering growth of FFs. A finer-grained view of principal-principal conflicts in FFs is thus discussed.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Anna Blombäck and Marcela Ramírez‐Pasillas

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the logics at work when companies decide what corporate features to communicate; which eventually also accounts for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the logics at work when companies decide what corporate features to communicate; which eventually also accounts for their corporate brands' identities.

Design/methodology/approach

As a case in point, the paper focuses on the concept of “family business” and investigates the rationale among companies to make particular reference to being such a company on their web sites – a decision the authors interpret as part of the corporate brand identity formation. Interviews are carried out with 14 CEOs in 12 small and medium‐sized family enterprises in a Swedish context. The paper employs a discourse analysis to distinguish patterns of corporate feature selection.

Findings

The results highlight how decisions that define corporate brand identity are not necessarily a consequence of rigorous marketing planning, but are sometimes made without concern for marketing matters. Three logics for the selection and formation of corporate brand identity features are identified: the habit, organic and intended logics. On account of these findings, a three logics model of corporate brand identity formation is developed, proposing differences between intuitive, emergent and strategic processes. In the intuitive process, managers construct brand identity based on tradition, instinctive beliefs and self‐perception. In the emergent process, the decision surfaces from active interplay between self‐perception among managers and the company's identity. In the strategic process, the decision is a product of an explicit brand strategy with focus on corporate communications.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small. No large firms are included. The paper focuses on one corporate feature, namely, being a family business.

Originality/value

Research on corporate brand identity is still largely conceptual. Drawing on empirical findings, this paper contributes to available theory and to practical insight.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Susanne Beck

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the relevance of conducting brand management research in a family firm context and to identify future research directions by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the relevance of conducting brand management research in a family firm context and to identify future research directions by reviewing and structuring the existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The potential consequences of being a family firm on internal organizational processes and stakeholders’ external perception are depicted. Afterwards the literature considering brand management research in family firms is reviewed systematically (n=41) and structured by applying the Organizational Viewpoint Framework. Relevant research questions are derived based on the findings and their practical relevance is tested.

Findings

The contributions are threefold. First, depicting the effects of being a family firm on the organization and its stakeholders highlights the relevance of conducting brand management research in family firms. Second, structuring the literature regarding the effects of being a family firm on organizational identity, intended brand image, construed brand image, and reputation helps derive research questions of theoretical and practical relevance that will serve the field as a guide for future research directions. Third, by extending the Organizational Viewpoint Framework originating from brand management research with the element of being a family firm, a further attempt at bridging both research fields is undertaken.

Originality/value

This paper represents an important next step in the development of this research field by highlighting the importance of conducting brand management research in a family firm context and by structuring existent research to depict future research opportunities with theoretical and practical relevance.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Esra Memili, Kimberly A. Eddleston, Thomas M. Zellweger, Franz W. Kellermanns and Tim Barnett

Drawing on organizational identity theory, we develop a model linking family ownership and expectations, entrepreneurial risk taking, and image in family firms to explain…

Abstract

Drawing on organizational identity theory, we develop a model linking family ownership and expectations, entrepreneurial risk taking, and image in family firms to explain family firm growth. Testing our model on a sample of 163 Swiss family firms, we suggest that entrepreneurial risk taking and image can both lead to growth in family firms. We further find that family expectations have an influence on both entrepreneurial risk taking and family firm image. This finding suggests that family firms may benefit from two growth paths – forward looking risk taking and the image of the family firm that builds on the past, and that these paths are nurtured by family expectations.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Marcelo S. Pagliarussi and Michel A. Leme

This study aims to understand how family values, family managers and non-family managers influence the institutionalization of management control systems in family firms.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how family values, family managers and non-family managers influence the institutionalization of management control systems in family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was conducted in a family business group that underwent a process of adoption and transformation of its management control system.

Findings

The results indicate that several non-family managers, besides the controller, played crucial roles in harmonizing the logic of a generalized practice (quality control management) with the existing rationalities of the family firm. The authors also observed that the ISO 9001/quality control management logic together with the family values of professionalism, meritocracy and an emphasis on the business’s identity rather than the family identity have laid the groundwork for the formalization of the business group’s management controls.

Practical implications

This study shows that quality control management is an accessible source of guidance for the formalization of managerial activities within an organization.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by clarifying the role performed by non-family managers during the formalization of management control in family firms. It also shows how the family values of professionalism, meritocracy and an emphasis on the business’s identity rather than family identity can influence the way control is exercised within family firms.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Salau Olarinoye Abdulmalik, Noor Afza Amran and Ayoib Che-Ahmad

This study aims to examine the unique nature of family firms by investigating the moderating effect of chief executive officer (CEO) identity on CEO career horizon and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the unique nature of family firms by investigating the moderating effect of chief executive officer (CEO) identity on CEO career horizon and the auditor’s client risk assessment. Consistent with literature on family businesses, the level of CEO attachment to socio-emotional wealth (SEW) varies among family businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a longitudinal sample of 2,063 non-financial family firm-year observations from 2005 to 2016 listed on the Bursa Malaysia. The study used the general method of moments (GMM), which controls for endogeneity concerns.

Findings

The results reveal that, without the moderating effect of CEO identity, the relationship between CEO career horizon and auditor’s risk assessment is positive, which suggests that the auditor’s risk perception of retiring CEOs is very high. However, the interaction of CEO identity reverses the relationship as evidenced by the negative and significant coefficient on the interacted terms. The finding suggests that the auditor’s perceived risk associated with CEO career horizon is lower in family firms with CEOs affiliated to family members or in which the CEO has an equity stake. Overall, the findings provide compelling evidence that the extent of the CEO’s attachment to the firm’s SEW affects the auditor’s client risk assessment.

Practical implications

The findings of the study serve as an enlightenment to policymakers such as Bursa Malaysia and Security Commission that within the family-controlled firms, differences still exist; therefore, there might be a need for future regulatory initiative to cater for the specific need of family-controlled firms.

Originality/value

The study contributes to prior literature by departing from the agency theory adopted in previous studies on auditor choice in family firms under the assumption that family firms are homogenous.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Cecilia Bjursell and Leif Melin

The purpose of this paper is to offer a new perspective on entrepreneurial identity as a narrative construction, emerging in stories about entering the family business.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a new perspective on entrepreneurial identity as a narrative construction, emerging in stories about entering the family business.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative methodological approach involves an interpretative analysis of transcribed interviews conducted in narrative style with 12 women from Swedish family businesses.

Findings

By presenting entrepreneurial identity as a combination of two distinct narratives, the “passive” entrance into the family business is highlighted. The “Pippi Longstocking” narrative illustrates conscious choices, drive and motivation based on an entrepreneurial identification: the proactive plot. The “Alice in Wonderland” narrative on the other hand, illustrates women who happen to become entrepreneurs or business persons because the family business was there: the reactive plot. The contrasting and complementing narratives illustrate ambiguities in the identity process.

Practical implications

The authors identified the following opportunities for women in family business: the family business can offer easy access to a career and on‐the‐job learning opportunities; education in other areas can be useful when learning how to manage and develop the family business; and the family business offers a generous arena for pursuing a career at different life stages. Implications for education as well as for policy makers are also presented.

Originality/value

The narratives presented are given metaphorical names with the intention to evoke the reader's reflection and reasoning by analogy, which can lead to new insights. The use of metaphors illustrates multiple layers and ambiguities in identity construction. Metaphors can also create awareness of the researcher as a co‐creator of knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 18000