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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2007

Seung-Yoon Rhee

I argue that while research on collective emotions is gaining in popularity, there has not been sufficient attention paid to understanding the mechanisms that explain how…

Abstract

I argue that while research on collective emotions is gaining in popularity, there has not been sufficient attention paid to understanding the mechanisms that explain how and why group emotions influence group outcomes. The goal of this chapter is to fill this gap by introducing group-member interactions as a group-level mechanism. I explore how positive and negative collective emotions in workgroups link to different types of member interactions, which in turn, influence group outcomes. Finally, I discuss the theoretical contributions of the research and the implications for future research on workgroup emotions and member interactions.

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Affect and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1413-3

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

John McClure, Jo White and Chris G. Sibley

The purpose of this paper is to show whether positive or negative framing of preparation messages leads to higher intentions to prepare for earthquakes, and whether the…

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1015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show whether positive or negative framing of preparation messages leads to higher intentions to prepare for earthquakes, and whether the more important component of the message is the framing of the preparation action or the framing of the outcome of not preparing.

Design/methodology/approach

Four message conditions were created by crossing the framing of preparation actions (taking or not taking action) and the framing of outcomes (experiencing harm and avoiding harm in an earthquake). They were presented to citizens (n=240) in Wellington, New Zealand, who judged the general importance of preparation and specific preparation steps.

Findings

The study finds that intentions to undertake both general and specific preparation were higher with negatively framed outcomes than positive outcomes. With specific actions, negative outcomes led to higher intentions to prepare when the action frame was positive (i.e. being well prepared).

Research limitations/implications

This research shows that negative framing should apply to outcome preparation and not to the action of preparing

Practical implications

These findings clarify that negative framing of outcomes is likely to increase preventive actions in relation to natural hazards.

Originality/value

This is the first study to show the affects of message framing on preparing for disasters.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Abdulla Hasan Almarzooqi, Mehmood Khan and Khalizani Khalid

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactional relationships between sustainable human resource management (HRM) and positive organizational outcomes, in…

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1706

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interactional relationships between sustainable human resource management (HRM) and positive organizational outcomes, in the context of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), focusing on employees’ perception and mediation of the direct relationships drawing on the theoretical background of the social exchange theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a web-based survey (293 usable responses). Respondents were full-time employees from the UAE’s oil-and-gas sector. The proposed hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression for direct and indirect relationships. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the validity of the proposed framework.

Findings

Sustainable HRM has a significant direct effect on sustainable employee performance and perceived sustainable organizational support. The mediating influence of organizational knowledge sharing (OKS) and employee empowerment were significant to varying degrees, proving the different interactions between the study constructs.

Practical implications

The mediating effect found for OKS and employee empowerment suggests that organizations should consider multiple combinations of practices to sustain positive outcomes, especially in dynamic markets. The alignment between different managerial practices can enhance anticipated organizational outcomes. Establishing knowledge-sharing practices will, therefore, help in enhancing employee performance, supporting the role of sustainable HRM. Empowering employees will also help in establishing a sense of perceived support that employees will value, leading to positive reciprocity from employees.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on sustainable HRM and its links to positive organizational outcomes in the context of the UAE. The study also demonstrates that mediators of the direct relationships can have varying effects and associations with different organizational outcomes.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Márcia Maurer Herter, Cristiane Pizzutti dos Santos and Diego Costa Pinto

Research suggests that women demonstrate higher levels of shopping satisfaction, recommendation, return intentions, and hedonic shopping than men. However, is it possible…

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5463

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that women demonstrate higher levels of shopping satisfaction, recommendation, return intentions, and hedonic shopping than men. However, is it possible to reduce the effects of gender on shopping behaviour? The purpose of this paper is to explore how the interaction between gender and emotions affects consumers’ shopping behaviour outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies show the effects of gender and emotions on shopping behaviour outcomes. Study 1 is a field experiment that tests the effects of gender and emotions (positive vs neutral) on consumer satisfaction, recommendation, and return intentions. Study 2 is a laboratory experiment that explores the effects of gender and emotions (positive, neutral, and negative) on hedonic shopping.

Findings

Results demonstrate that positive (vs neutral) emotions increase shopping behaviour outcomes for men, to reach the same level as for women. The findings also indicate that retail environment perception mediates the effects. Moreover, the results show that positive emotions increase levels of hedonic shopping for men and that negative emotions reduce levels of hedonic shopping for women.

Practical implications

This paper helps retailers enhance shopping behaviour outcomes in retail environments. From a managerial perspective, the findings also provide insights on how to improve shopping behaviour outcomes for male consumers.

Originality/value

This paper shows how to reduce gender effects on consumer shopping behaviour outcomes by activating specific emotions in retail environments. This research also demonstrates the mediating role of retail environment perception.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2017

Lars Glasø, Anders Skogstad, Guy Notelaers and Ståle Einarsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which emotional experiences mediate the relationships between employees’ perception of considerate and/or tyrannical…

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1575

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which emotional experiences mediate the relationships between employees’ perception of considerate and/or tyrannical leadership behaviors and their work engagement and intention to leave the organization. The notion of symmetric and asymmetric relationships between specific kinds of leadership behavior, emotional reactions, and followers’ attitudinal outcomes is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a survey design, the variables were assessed in a cross-sectional sample of 312 employees.

Findings

The study confirmed the notion of symmetric relationships between specific kinds of leadership behavior, emotional reactions, and followers’ attitudinal outcomes. Contrary to the general notion that “bad is stronger than good,” the results indicated that positive emotions were equal or stronger mediators than the negative ones regarding the two outcomes measured in the present study.

Originality/value

The paper is, to the authors’ knowledge, the first paper which examines simultaneously how constructive and destructive leadership styles, and positive and negative affects, are related to employee attitudes outcomes, and evokes a discussion when bad is stronger than good or vice versa regarding leadership outcomes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2016

Pei-Ling Wu, Shih-Shuo Yeh, Tzung-Cheng (T.C.) Huan and Arch G. Woodside

Recognizing Gigerenzer’s (1991) dictum that scientists’ tools are not neutral (tools-in-use influence theory formulation as well as data interpretation), this chapter…

Abstract

Recognizing Gigerenzer’s (1991) dictum that scientists’ tools are not neutral (tools-in-use influence theory formulation as well as data interpretation), this chapter reports theory and examines data in ways that transcend the dominant logics for variable-based and case-based analyses. The theory and data analysis tests key propositions in complexity theory: (1) no single antecedent condition is a sufficient or necessary indicator of a high score in an outcome condition; (2) a few of many available complex configurations of antecedent conditions are sufficient indicators of high scores in an outcome condition; (3) contrarian cases occur, that is, low scores in a single antecedent condition associates with both high and low scores for an outcome condition for different cases; (4) causal asymmetry occurs, that is, accurate causal models for high scores for an outcome condition are not the mirror opposites of causal models for low scores for the same outcome condition. The study tests and supports these propositions in the context of customer assessments (n = 436) of service facets and service-outcome evaluations for assisted temporary-transformations of self via beauty salon and spa treatments. The findings contribute to advancing a nuanced theory of how customers’ service evaluations relate to their assessments of overall service quality and intentions to use the service. The findings support the need for service managers to be vigilant in fine-tuning service facets and service enactment to achieve the objective of high customer retention.

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Bad to Good
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-333-7

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2007

Julie E. Kendall and Kenneth E. Kendall

We propose a framework of positive design approaches that can be effective in creating quality systems. Quality systems are systems delivered on time, with high quality…

Abstract

We propose a framework of positive design approaches that can be effective in creating quality systems. Quality systems are systems delivered on time, with high quality, effectiveness, and user satisfaction standards. The framework is conceptualized as a 2×2 framework, where the first (or y) axis reflects the way in which positive approaches are introduced into the group or organization. At one end of the y axis is the direct approach, while the other end represents the indirect approach, which is culturally embedded. The second dimension, on the x axis, is represented by invisible changes on one end, and visible changes on the other. Invisible changes are those that are unobtrusive in nature. We explore actual examples of design that made a positive difference in the quality of a group of individuals’ work lives and well-being through the use of messages, technologies, information, and shared views. We use verbal analysis as an intuitive, reflective, and interpretive approach to examine our own and others’ narratives of systems success to trace the linkages that support the notion that positive approaches result in positive outcomes for developers of information systems. We analyze stories about introducing positive memes; empowering decision makers through information sharing; encouraging an open source philosophy; and embracing positive metaphors to positively shape the users’ subculture. In doing so, we examine stories from systems researchers who have experienced positive IS design outcomes. Our contribution is to mine the linkages between actions designers take and the positive outcomes users experience; the suggested methods that designers can use to create positive outcomes; and examining specific examples where design methods used in a positive way contributed to positive outcomes for systems, users, the adoption of new technologies, and improved organizations.

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Designing Information and Organizations with a Positive Lens
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-398-3

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Kumar Rakesh Ranjan, Rupanwita Dash, Praveen Sugathan and Wen Mao

In important interpersonal service interactions with a frontline employee (FLE), consumers at times fail to carry out their share of responsibility in the execution of the…

Abstract

Purpose

In important interpersonal service interactions with a frontline employee (FLE), consumers at times fail to carry out their share of responsibility in the execution of the service, resulting in a situation of “consumer created emergency”. This might defeat the consumer's goal of availing the service (termed as consumer failure). This study explains the role of employee's hope in managing consumer failure in the situation of consumer created emergencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested in three experiments that simulated service emergency across a general printing service situation and a travel service situation.

Findings

The study shows that: (1) FLE hope has a positive effect on consumer satisfaction, and is mediated by the consumer's assumed effort by the FLE; (2) the effect of FLE hope on consumer satisfaction changes with changing levels of consumer hopefulness about the service outcome; (3) despite situation of consumer created emergency, consumer failure results in low consumer satisfaction due to attribution error and (4) external attribution by the FLE could not significantly rectify consumer's attribution error and hence could not alleviate consumer dissatisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The study suggests relevance and pathways of managing emotions and attributions of consumers and FLEs for superior performance outcomes.

Originality/value

The study theorizes and tests the role of hope, which is an important positive emotion during emergencies because frontline service settings have heretofore predominantly focused on managing negative traits and outcomes.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2008

Jan E. Stets and Shelley N. Osborn

Recent developments in identity theory are used to understand emotions in distributive justice theory. Three issues are examined: the consistency vs. enhancement dynamic…

Abstract

Recent developments in identity theory are used to understand emotions in distributive justice theory. Three issues are examined: the consistency vs. enhancement dynamic, the status dynamic, and the resource dynamic. Results reveal individuals initially react positively to over-rewards; later they react more negatively. We suggest that the enhancement process occurs initially; the consistency process occurs later. Regarding status, persons respond negatively to unjust outcomes when they come from higher status persons. Finally, positive emotions are a resource for individuals initially and across encounters, buffering the effect of repeated unjust outcomes. Overall, this study helps develop emotions in distributive justice theory.

Details

Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-104-6

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