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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Bilal Ahmad, Shahid Latif, Ahmad Raza Bilal and Mahnoor Hai

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the relationships between career competency, career resilience and career success. The study further examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the relationships between career competency, career resilience and career success. The study further examines the mediating role of career resilience on the relationship between career competency and career success.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 284 Islamic bank employees across Pakistan through a cross-sectional, self-reporting, online questionnaire. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed hypotheses using Smart PLS version 3.0.

Findings

The study’s results indicate that career competency is a significant predictor of career resilience, and that career resilience is subsequently a significant predictor of career success. Further, the results of the structural equation model analyses supported the proposition that career resilience mediates the relationship between career competency and career success.

Practical implications

Human resource practitioners and managers can increase the likelihood of their employees’ career resilience by focusing on developing career-related competencies – an antecedent of career success.

Originality/value

The study clarifies prevailing misconceptions that assume a direct linear relationship between career competency and career success by establishing, through empirical evidence, that success is not an ultimate outcome of competence. In addition, it proposes an oversimplified model of the competence–resilience–success relationship.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Sean T. Lyons, Linda Schweitzer and Eddy S.W. Ng

Career resilience (CR) is an increasingly important, but under-researched aspect of modern careers. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of CR on…

Abstract

Purpose

Career resilience (CR) is an increasingly important, but under-researched aspect of modern careers. The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of CR on the relationships between personality factors, career self-evaluations and modern career orientation and the outcome of career satisfaction (CS). The authors hypothesized that CR would be positively associated with the “big-5” personality factors, career self-evaluations (self-efficacy and external locus of control) and modern career orientations (protean and boundaryless orientations) and that CR would mediate those variables’ relationships with CS.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants in the study were 1,988 employed managers and professionals. Structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed relationships and mediation model.

Findings

CR mediated the relationships between CS and emotional stability, conscientiousness, emotional stability, openness to experience, internal work locus of control, career self-efficacy and protean career attitudes. Contrary to expectations, being values-driven was negatively associated with CR, producing a negative net indirect effect on CS.

Research limitations/implications

The study extends previous work concerning CR by examining the role of CR as a mediator between various psychological career factors and CS (i.e. subjective career success). An important issue is whether CR is a unique construct relative to psychological resilience. The results suggest that this may be the case, but direct comparison between the two constructs is required to answer the question definitively.

Practical implications

Strengthening CR through career development interventions can have important impacts on CS, particularly for those individuals who are values-driven or have boundaryless mindsets and preferences for organizational mobility.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relationship between CR and “new career” attitudes (i.e. boundaryless and protean career orientations), which have been the topic of much research. The authors contribute to the career success research by linking CR and modern career orientation to CS and demonstrating that CR mediates the relationships between career-related psychological factors (personality, self-evaluation and modern career orientation) and CS.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Jessica Borg, Naomi Borg, Christina M. Scott-Young and Nader Naderpajouh

There is a need for project management practitioners to adapt and thrive in today's volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) project-based workplaces. In this…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need for project management practitioners to adapt and thrive in today's volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) project-based workplaces. In this paper, the linkage between work readiness and career resilience is developed, presenting both concepts as critical for effective strategic responses and adaptation to the changing labor market in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The resource-based view (RBV) and integrated dynamic capabilities (IDCs) are the theoretical lenses that are used to link the concepts of work readiness and career resilience across the individual and organizational levels.

Findings

A framework and model are proposed to establish a holistic understanding of catalysts for addressing the VUCA context that organizations face. The proposed conceptual linkage adds a chronological dimension to the formation of the interrelated dynamic capabilities during the early career phase of project management practitioners.

Practical implications

The contribution to the project management literature includes a theoretically driven conceptual framework that links two complementary concepts to address the career challenges faced by project managers. Work readiness is positioned as an enabler of career resilience and together they constitute vital attributes which foster talent retention in the current VUCA work environment.

Originality/value

Work readiness and career resilience are underexplored topics in the project management literature, both individually and in conjunction. Specifically, there is a research gap in view of linking these two concepts to present them as a catalyst for project management talent sustainability, and the proposed framework is an initial step in addressing these gaps.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2020

Isyaku Salisu, Norashidah Hashim, Munir Shehu Mashi and Hamza Galadanchi Aliyu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of grit (consistency of interest and perseverance of effort) on entrepreneurial career success (career satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of grit (consistency of interest and perseverance of effort) on entrepreneurial career success (career satisfaction, perceived career achievement and perceived financial attainment) through the role of resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was cross-sectional, and the data were collected using questionnaires from 111 entrepreneurs in Nigeria who have been in business for over five years and were selected using purposive sampling technique. The study used Smart-PLS to assess the measurement and structural model.

Findings

The perseverance of effort was related to all the aspects of career success as well as resilience. But consistency of interest was positively related to only perceived financial attainment. It also predicted resilience. Resilience was also related to all the facets of career success. All three mediation hypotheses were supported.

Research limitations/implications

The study delivered fascinating understandings into the structures of grit. The Western conceptualisation of grit may not be valid in a collectivist society where consistency is not that very much considered.

Practical implications

The study helps to further validate grit in the entrepreneurship field; the construct is a facilitator of entrepreneurial action and an indispensable source of energy that can revitalise the entrepreneur along the arduous road to success.

Originality/value

The two components of grit can have a dissimilar influence on different outcomes – as prior investigations, although recognising that the two components are conceptually dissimilar, have rarely studied them so empirically.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Abdullah M. Abu‐Tineh

Two main purposes guide this study. The first is to assess the level of individual, group, and organizational learning at Qatar University (QU), and the level of career

Abstract

Purpose

Two main purposes guide this study. The first is to assess the level of individual, group, and organizational learning at Qatar University (QU), and the level of career resilience among its faculty members. The second is to explore the relationships between these levels of learning at QU and the career resilience of its faculty members.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature and was conducted using a survey methodology as its research design. A variety of statistical techniques were utilized in this research. A multiple regression model, the Pearson production‐moment correlation coefficient (r), means, and standard deviations were used as the main statistical techniques.

Findings

The findings of this study indicated that faculty members at QU practice three different levels of learning – i.e. individual learning, departmental learning, and university learning – separately or combined in a moderately high way. Further, the results clarified that faculty members at QU perceived themselves to have a moderately high level of career resilience. In terms of the relationship between career resilience and the three different levels of learning, the results of the Pearson production‐moment correlation coefficient (r) and the coefficient of determination, R2, statistically confirmed the positive, modest, and significant relationship between career resilience and the three levels of learning combined.

Originality/value

A hypothesized correlation between career resilience and organizational learning is affirmed. The results of this study confirm the feasibility of connecting two emerging frameworks, i.e. organizational learning and career resilience. Therefore, studying the organizational learning of faculty members is a device that can be used to predict the possibility of faculty members adopting the characteristics and values of a learning organization in their academic life individually or organizationally, while displaying minimal dysfunctional behavior through their career resilience.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Maurice M. Grzeda

In addressing environmentally induced career change, the career development practitioner is better informed by a career development model than more traditional approaches…

Abstract

In addressing environmentally induced career change, the career development practitioner is better informed by a career development model than more traditional approaches. The model was tested with Canadian managers and professionals whose positions had been eliminated. Simple regression analysis revealed that career resilience was positively related to three of five job facets that served as indicators of career change. The findings lend support to career development practitioners who strive to build career resilience among employees. Along with organizational advantages already documented, individuals who develop career resilience will be better equipped to face the inevitable prospect of changing careers in the future.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Naznin Tabassum, Sujana Shafique, Anastasia Konstantopoulou and Ahmad Arslan

This paper aims to provide a framework with the antecedents of women managers’ resilience in SMEs.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework with the antecedents of women managers’ resilience in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This developmental study uses a comprehensive literature review and a set of propositions to identify the antecedent of women managers’ resilience and develops a conceptual framework for resilience.

Findings

The results indicate that in addition to personal resilience traits, interactive engagement with the work environment, career adaptability and positive human resource management (HRM) interventions are the main antecedents of women managers’ resilience.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to theory by providing a new perspective on the study of resilience as a process at the organisational level and as a trait at personal level. It contributes to the women employee-centric resilience discussion in HRM literature and explores the relationship between resilience and women managers’ career progression. This is a developmental study, and despite the strengths of the undertaken approach, there are a number of limitations due to the lack of empirical evidence. Therefore, future research activities should focus on validating the framework and determining any potential boundaries of this resilience framework.

Practical implications

The study reveals a number of practical implications leading to a recommended resilience toolkit for HR managers of organisations to develop and promote resilience in their women managers and aspiring managers.

Social implications

The social implications of this study include the social relationships within the work-setting, better employee engagement and interaction with the work environment and flexible career progression pathways.

Originality/value

The paper is based on rich conceptual and theoretical discussion that identifies the key antecedents of women managers’ resilience. The study also conceptually establishes the moderating relationship between women managers’ resilience and work stress and burnout.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Yi-chun Lin and Angela Shin-yih Chen

Career plateau is a major concern for many seasoned employees because they often stay in the same position longer than expected and over time begin to lack job challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

Career plateau is a major concern for many seasoned employees because they often stay in the same position longer than expected and over time begin to lack job challenges. This phenomenon is now considered a normal stage in career development. The purpose of this study is to test the effects of two types of career plateau: hierarchical and job content on career commitment (career identity, career insight and career resilience), along with the mediating effect of perceived external employability. We also determined in the moderated mediation model if Super's (1957) three career stages amplify and attenuate the indirect effect of hierarchical/job content plateau on career commitment (career identity, career insight, career resilience) via perceived external employability.

Design/methodology/approach

We tested the hypotheses with survey data collected from a convenience sample of 472 white-collar full-time employees who also studied in the MBA and continuing education program in five large universities in Taiwan (77% return rate).

Findings

The mediation model result showed that perceived external employability partially and negatively mediated the influence of hierarchical plateaus on career commitment (career identity, career insight and career resilience). Perceived external employability partially and negatively mediated the influence of job content plateaus on career identity and career insight but fully and negatively mediated on career resilience. The result of the moderated mediation model also demonstrated that only employees in the trial stage had influences on the mediation relationships among the hierarchical plateau, perceived external employability and career commitment with its two dimensions of career identity and career insight only other than those in the stabilization and maintenance stages.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can benefit career management scholars and practitioners since they promote a better understanding of the career management practices that are relevant for seasoned employees who are valued for their knowledge, experience and expertise when encountering the three career stages.

Originality/value

Drawing on the conservation of resources (COR) theoretical perspective, we fill the gap in the literature by proposing perceived external employability as a mediator in the link between career plateau and career commitment and generalize the results to plateaued employees at the different career stages.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Holly Slay Ferraro, Greg Prussia and Shambhavi Mehrotra

The purpose of this paper is to examine how age norms influence the relationship between individual differences, job attitudes, and intentions to pursue career transitions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how age norms influence the relationship between individual differences, job attitudes, and intentions to pursue career transitions for midlife adults (aged 35 and above). The authors hypothesized that the effects of individual difference variables (i.e. resilience and reframing abilities) on career change intentions in addition to the effects of job attitude (i.e. commitment) on such intentions are moderated by career youth norms (CYN) which the authors defined as perceptions that the typical worker in a career field is younger than midlife.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 206 people comprised the sample which was derived from an online survey. Moderated regression analysis was used to assess the extent to which age norms operated as a moderator of proposed relationships. Control variables were included based on prior research findings.

Findings

Findings demonstrated that age norms operate as a significant moderator for midlife adults. Specifically, the relationships between resilience, reframing, and commitment on intentions to pursue alternative careers are moderated by CYNs.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from a single source and assessed behavioral intentions in place of actual career change choice. Future research should derive data from multiple sources and assess behavior beyond intentions.

Practical implications

Industry leaders’ stereotypes about the appropriate ages for specific occupations or professions may impact the psychological mobility of midlife workers. Managers may wish to highlight midlife workers with particular skills (e.g. technological savvy), examine recruitment advertising for language that emphasizes youth, and invest in resilience training for aging workers.

Originality/value

Research examining careers at midlife and beyond has extensively discussed age discrimination and stereotypes as potential barriers to professional or occupational change. However, few studies have investigated how age norms and the comparisons people make between themselves and those they believe are occupying the jobs they desire may also pose barriers to career transition.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Manuel London

Career motivation is usually examinedamong young or mid‐career workers.The older worker is left alone.Unfortunately, in an environment inwhich the older person represents…

Abstract

Career motivation is usually examined among young or mid‐career workers. The older worker is left alone. Unfortunately, in an environment in which the older person represents the fastest growing segment of the labour force, this critical resource is being frittered away. Examination of current practices suggests a large portion of older workers are persuaded by their employers′ actions that their careers are at an end. Alternatives to extend and increase this group′s career motivation are discussed.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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