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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Shalini Srivastava and Swati Agarwal

This study investigates the association between workplace bullying and intention to leave. The study further attempts to understand the mediating and moderating roles of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the association between workplace bullying and intention to leave. The study further attempts to understand the mediating and moderating roles of emotional exhaustion and supervisory support respectively on workplace bullying and intention to leave relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Statistical tools like SPSS and PROCESS Hayes were used for the analysis. Techniques like CFA, regression, moderation mediation analysis were used.

Findings

Utilizing conservation of resources (COR) theory and a sample of 480 employees from hospitality sector in India, we found that WPB was positively related to intention to leave. We also found that supervisory support moderated the relationships between emotional exhaustion and intention to leave and emotional exhaustion acted as a mediator between workplace bullying and intention to leave.

Research limitations/implications

First, for the survey self-report questionnaire was employed; hence, it may be biased due to the social desirability effect. However, the researcher has stated that for workplace behavior like an intention to leave and supervisory support, the self-report survey is applicable (Bennett and Robinson, 2000). This study is limited in scope to measure cause-and-effect relationship because it is a cross-sectional study. Therefore, in correlation, the chronological order cannot be established as data were collected at the same time.

Practical implications

First, the result of the study established that workplace bullying can result in high intention to leave which will adversely affect the organization in the long term. Therefore, it is necessary that managers and businesses need to act to reduce workplace bullying. The managers in the organization should facilitate the friendly work environment and implement practices that are detrimental to bullying behaviors.

Social implications

Since workplace bullying not only affects the target but also the team’s success and organization and the society as a whole, the organization should think of exploring the impact of workplace bullying on team cohesiveness and organizational performance.

Originality/value

This study seeks to explore in more detail the problem of bullying in the hospitality sector in India. The impetus for the study was the growing concern that bullying is creating a lot of turmoil in the life of employees making them either face the situation by being emotionally strong or leave the organization.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Matti Meriläinen, Pirkko Nissinen and Kristi Kõiv

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the degree of intention to leave and the relation between bullying and intention to leave, as well as the relation between features…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reveal the degree of intention to leave and the relation between bullying and intention to leave, as well as the relation between features of the working environment and intention to leave among Estonian university personnel.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 864 faculty members from nine Estonian universities answered the e-mail questionnaire in the Spring of 2014. The nature of bullying was measured with the help of the Negative Acts Questionnaire. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire was applied in a survey of characteristics of the work environment. The relations were analysed with the help of structural equation modelling.

Findings

More than one third of the respondents had considered quitting sometimes, quite often, or very often. The results show that perceived bullying is a predictor of intention to leave, whereas a favourable working environment prevents quitting.

Research limitations/implications

The present results can be utilised from at least three perspectives: cultural and institutional studies, leadership practices and personal work control.

Practical implications

Knowing the characteristics of bullying helps in recognising and preventing bullying and aids in improving the working atmosphere at universities.

Originality/value

This study revealed that besides directly, bullying is related to explained intention to leave indirectly, mediated by (negative) work environment perceptions. This indicates that bullying gives rise to an unfavourable working atmosphere and further to intention to leave.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Andrew Robson and Fiona Robson

– The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the key antecedents of leave intention demonstrated by nurses employed in UK National Health Service (NHS).

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1771

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the key antecedents of leave intention demonstrated by nurses employed in UK National Health Service (NHS).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey assessment of a sample of 433 nurses employed within the NHS was undertaken, potential relationships relating to both affective commitment and leave intention and work-place experiences assessed through leader-member exchange (LMX) and perceived organisational support (POS) have been evaluated quantitatively, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equations modelling (SEM).

Findings

The study indicates that both LMX and POS act as direct antecedents to nurses’ leave intention. Additionally, both LMX and POS in combination, significantly effect employees’ affective commitment, the latter further impacting on employee leave intention. This would suggest that both LMX and POS have a significant role to play in employee leave intention that is partially mediated by affective commitment, further analysis confirming this to be the case.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of nurses is large in absolute terms, permitting the CFA/SEM analysis undertaken, although the data represented only two NHS trusts, hence generalisation across the NHS should be done so cautiously. Various other drivers of leave intention, personal and organisational, have not been assessed here.

Practical implications

The implications of these results are that to safeguard nurse retention, appropriate line manager engagement is crucial, but this requires organisational support that is recognised by the employees, especially to enhance their levels of affective commitment.

Originality/value

This is given by providing NHS-based assessment of the role of both POS and LMX in the realisation of both affective commitment and desire to remain with their current organisations amongst members of the UK nursing profession.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Jennifer M. Kidd and Frances Green

This study seeks to identify some of the factors that explain biomedical research scientists' career commitment and that prompt them to consider leaving science. It also…

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6032

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to identify some of the factors that explain biomedical research scientists' career commitment and that prompt them to consider leaving science. It also aims to examine whether these factors differ between men and women, and between those with different family responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal questionnaire survey was used to identify the demographic and work‐related variables that predicted three dimensions of career commitment and intention to leave science one year later.

Findings

The factors explaining career commitment and intention to remain in the profession were similar for men and women, for those with various types of family responsibilities, and for those on permanent and temporary contracts. Career planning was predicted by continuance organizational commitment and the opportunity for autonomy in the workplace, and career resilience by equitable treatment at work. Career identity, career resilience and salary were predictors of intention to leave science.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the lack of a random sample, and the fact that some instruments differ slightly from the original versions. A substantial proportion of the variance in intention to leave science was unexplained and further research should therefore explore the impact of career entrenchment, professional socialisation and aspects of personal disposition on intention to leave a profession.

Practical implications

Those who manage scientists' careers should attend particularly to pay, providing opportunities for working autonomously, and fair treatment.

Originality/value

A longitudinal design was used and some key workplace variables were studied. Unlike most previous studies, the moderating effects of gender, relationship status and parenthood were examined.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Patricia Yin Yin Lau, Gary N. McLean, Bella Ya-Hui Lien and Yen-Chen Hsu

The purpose of this paper is to determine if self-rated and peer-rated organizational citizenship behavior mediated the relationship between affective commitment and…

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2187

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if self-rated and peer-rated organizational citizenship behavior mediated the relationship between affective commitment and intention to leave in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey yielded 516 responses from multiple locations in Malaysia across varied industries for a response rate of 64.5 percent. Validity based on confirmatory factor analysis and reliability were confirmed.

Findings

Affective commitment influenced self- and peer-rated organizational citizenship behavior and intention to leave. Only self-rated organizational citizenship behavior partially mediated affective commitment and intention to leave. While self-rated organizational citizenship behavior increased intention to leave positively, peer-rated organizational citizenship behavior did not influence intention to leave.

Practical implications

The findings confirm earlier research that self-ratings and peer-ratings are different, and, surprisingly, organizational citizenship behavior is not a factor supporting talent retention. Human resource practitioners need to shift their focus to affective commitment that reduces intention to leave and increases organizational citizenship behavior.

Originality/value

Past studies on organizational citizenship behavior relied on self-ratings, supervisor-ratings, or both ratings used in Western contexts. Little was known about the assessment of organizational citizenship behavior from peer perspectives and its relationship between affective commitment and intention to leave. Moreover, the relationships between affective commitment and self-rated and peer-rated organizational citizenship behavior were inconsistent. This study responded to those gaps by integrating affective commitment, self-rated, and peer-rated organizational citizenship behavior, and intention to leave into a single hypothesized model.

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Subhash C. Kundu and Neha Gahlawat

This paper aims to advance the research on relationship between high performance work systems (HPWS) and employees’ intention to leave by examining the mediating role of…

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3340

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance the research on relationship between high performance work systems (HPWS) and employees’ intention to leave by examining the mediating role of trust, motivation and organizational citizenship behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data based on 563 respondents were analysed to investigate the relationship between HPWS, employee outcomes and employees’ intention to leave. Statistical techniques like confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, regression and bootstrapping were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The study has revealed that the application of HPWS in the form of rigorous staffing, extensive training, performance-based appraisal and compensation, employee relations, self-managed teams, flexible work arrangements and empowerment results in enhanced employee work-related outcomes and decreased intention to leave among employees. The results have indicated that the relationship between HPWS and employees’ intention to leave is serially mediated by employee outcomes.

Practical implications

The study gives strong indications that investments in creating bundles of high performance HR practices will enhance the value of the human capital by eliciting favourable employee attitudes and behaviours and therefore will prove beneficial for the organizations operating in India.

Originality/value

This study has attempted to provide new insights in the underlying mechanism existing in the relationship between HPWS and employees’ intention to leave by using multiple mediators in sequence.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Robinson James and Theophilus Azungah

This paper aims to examine the influence of academic repatriates’ perceived organizational support, adjustment and external employment opportunity on their intention to leave.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of academic repatriates’ perceived organizational support, adjustment and external employment opportunity on their intention to leave.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from Sri Lankan academics who returned to their home university after completing their work (teaching/research) abroad. The repatriates who involved in teaching and research for one or more years abroad were included in this survey.

Findings

Results indicated that repatriates’ both the perceived organizational support had an important role to play in the prediction of repatriation adjustment and intention to leave. In turn, academics who adjusted to their repatriation better were highly likely to stay at their home university. In addition, repatriates’ perceived organizational support decreased their intention to leave through adjustment. In addition, when repatriates had trouble in adjustment and perceived high external employment opportunities, they reported higher intentions to leave the university than those who perceived fewer external employment opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

This study relied on cross-sectional and self-reported data and was conducted with small number of sample (112).

Practical implications

For the academic institutions, this study will help to clarify their role in managing repatriation adjustment and develop appropriate organizational systems that can facilitate repatriates to better adjust to their repatriation which, in turn, reduces their intention to leave. This study signifies the role of management in retaining repatriates.

Originality/value

This study further contributes to the current discussion on repatriation and moves this discussion to academic repatriates. This study, particularly, discusses the issues of retaining repatriates in a Sri Lankan context as a developing country where attracting and retaining academic repatriates are more challenging tasks for universities.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Evgeniya Balabanova, Azer Efendiev, Mats Ehrnrooth and Alexei Koveshnikov

– The purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents of intentions to leave among blue-collar employees in domestic Russian organizations.

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1553

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine antecedents of intentions to leave among blue-collar employees in domestic Russian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a sample of 1,210 blue-collar employees in 80 domestic organizations across 14 industries and eight regions in Russia.

Findings

The analysis shows that wage satisfaction is the strongest negative predictor of Russian employees’ intentions to leave compared to core job-related and interpersonal relations satisfaction. For non-blat employees, the relationships with intentions to leave are negative and significant for all three types of satisfactions, whereas for employees with blat only the relationship between core job-related satisfaction and intentions to leave is significant.

Originality/value

The present study, first, reveals that wage satisfaction is the most important but not the only way to retain blue-collar employees in Russia and, second, points toward the complex nature of blat’s influence on employees’ organizational behavior in contemporary Russian organizations. By so doing, the analysis provides a still rare empirical illustration of how relationships and variables explaining turnover intentions and its antecedents are contingent on economic, cultural and institutional contexts.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Beatrice I.J.M. van der Heijden, Karen van Dam and Hans Martin Hasselhorn

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential predictors of nurses' intention to leave the nursing profession. Specifically, this study investigates whether…

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5143

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine potential predictors of nurses' intention to leave the nursing profession. Specifically, this study investigates whether perceptions of the interpersonal work environment, work‐home interference, and subsequent job satisfaction, would predict occupational turnover intentions beyond the impact of nurses' occupational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire is completed twice, with a one‐year interval by 1,187 registered nurses. Data were collected between October 2002 and June 2003.

Findings

The outcomes of structural equation modelling analyses reveal that an unsupportive work environment, low leadership quality, and high work‐to‐home interference results in lower job satisfaction, which, in turn, predicts nurses' intention to leave the profession one year afterwards, when controls for occupational commitment. Work‐to‐home interference shows an additional, direct relationship with occupational turnover intentions.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for organizational and individual interventions, indicating that nurses' withdrawal from the profession may be prevented by extending nurses' social support at work, helping them to combine work with non‐work, and improving the leadership quality of their supervisors.

Originality/value

Job satisfaction and work‐context factors explain additional variance in intention to leave nursing, beyond the effect of occupational commitment. Leadership quality is the strongest predictor of intention to leave nursing. Job satisfaction plays an intervening role in the relationship between work context and intention to leave nursing.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Hanafiah Haji Hasin and Normah Haji Omar

This study investigated the relationship between job satisfaction, job‐related stress and intention to leave among audit staff in public accounting firms. Effects of…

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2726

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between job satisfaction, job‐related stress and intention to leave among audit staff in public accounting firms. Effects of demographic factors on job satisfaction; and the relationship between the elements of two‐factor theory with job satisfaction and job‐related stress were also identified. Data for the study was collected through questionnaires. Statistical analysis such as chi‐square test, factor analysis, correlation analysis and multiple regressions were used. The results indicated that job satisfaction and job‐related stress were significantly related to intention to leave the job. Only demographic factors such as pay or salary, job position and highest education achieved were found to have effect on job satisfaction. Elements of motivators and elements of hygiene were related to job satisfaction and jobrelated stress respectively. The findings of this study may contribute to planning and implementing human resource management’s (HRM) retention strategies. Several suggestions for future research are also presented. If the antecedents of intention to leave can be identified, appropriate HRM practices may minimize dysfunctional turnover of high quality employees.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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