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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Kirill Lvovich Rozhkov and Natalya Il’inichna Skriabina

This paper aims to develop a theoretical approach to place market analysis that aims to identify the ways in which specific places are used and to further enable the…

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1975

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a theoretical approach to place market analysis that aims to identify the ways in which specific places are used and to further enable the identification of distinct segments and products.

Design/methodology/approach

Typology construction was chosen as the main study method. Eight polar place demand patterns were classified on the abstract level, using a set of binary variables of spatial behaviour (migration, natural growth and settling). Based on this typology, eight abstract places were deductively described. In conjunction with this deductive study, the authors conducted focus groups, and the results showed considerable similarity in the interpretation of the achieved types.

Findings

This paper arrives at interdependent typologies of place demand, place product and place use patterns that allow the ways of using specific places to be identified and distinctive segments and products to be distinguished as particular, consistent combinations of the achieved types.

Practical implications

The typologies obtained expand the scope of competitive analysis and planning in framing place marketing. Distinct uses of specific places unambiguously point to the features of certain segments and could thereby enable a lucid marketing strategy.

Originality/value

Empirically driven place market research has not precisely defined the distinct ideas and concepts of investigated places, which might reflect the different segments of the population that have different intentions for the use of these places. This paper offers important insights into product differentiation and market segmentation in the frame of simultaneous product use.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

John Cheese, Abby Day and Gordon Wills

An updated version of the original (1985) text, the book covers all aspects of marketing and selling bank services: the role of marketing; behaviour of customers;…

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3174

Abstract

An updated version of the original (1985) text, the book covers all aspects of marketing and selling bank services: the role of marketing; behaviour of customers; intelligence, planning and organisation; product decisions; promotion decisions; place decisions; price decisions; achieving sales. Application questions help to focus the readers' minds on key issues affecting practice.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Thomas N. Garavan, John P. Wilson, Christine Cross, Ronan Carbery, Inga Sieben, Andries de Grip, Christer Strandberg, Claire Gubbins, Valerie Shanahan, Carole Hogan, Martin McCracken and Norma Heaton

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It…

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7720

Abstract

Purpose

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call centres operate. Call centres operate as open systems and training, development and HRD practices are influenced by environmental, strategic, organisational and temporal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a range of research methods, including in‐depth interviews with multiple stakeholders, documentary analysis and observation. The study was conducted over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results indicate that normative models of HRD are not particularly valuable and that training, development and HRD in call centres is emergent and highly complex.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first studies to investigate training and development and HRD practices and systems in European call centres.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Kevina Cody

This paper attempts to contribute to an expanding body of literature that critically engages with both the theory and practice of market segmentation. Through the…

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3777

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to contribute to an expanding body of literature that critically engages with both the theory and practice of market segmentation. Through the theoretical lens of liminality and its implicit elements, the notion of boundary creation inherent in age‐based market segmentation of the youth market is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Using empirical data collected as part of a longitudinal study on liminal consumers, marketing's attempt at laying down parameters and constructing borders is presented as a strategic exacerbation of liminal zones already replete with tension and ambiguity.

Findings

It is concluded that theoretical consideration of this data highlights the fluidity and porous nature of such constructed boundaries, rendering attempts at creating discernable, knowable segments, potentially futile. Thus by critically viewing this segment, not just as a marketing demographic, but as a liminal zone, an alternative consideration of the theory and practice of age segmentation is presented.

Research limitations/implications

The longitudinal study spanned a period from midway through the participants' final months of primary education and early stages of secondary education. Research that focused on their completion of a year in secondary education would perhaps have yielded further insights.

Practical implications

This research offers tangible insights into the social worlds of a burgeoning market segment, albeit a liminal one, offering actionable realities based on the inextricable intertwining of their consumption practices and lived experiences.

Social implications

Rather than view children as socio‐cultural non‐descripts who are of interest to marketers purely for their ability to be located along a continuum of cognitive development, this research aims to understand and explore the specific intricasies of the tweens' mediation of their liminal world using consumption practices

Originality/value

Consumption practices emerged that highlighted the attempted resolution and mediation of such tensions while also pointing to the clear mutability and ambiguity of supposed borders between child, tween and teen segmented groups. Age‐segmentation, conceptualised by marketers as a strategic creation of borders so as to enhance product offerings little reflects the realities of how age is perceived, experienced and acted out by those categorised within the margins and parameters of targeted marketing. By viewing this segment, not just as a marketing demographic but as a liminal zone where liminars “elude or slip through the network of classifications that normally locate states and positions in cultural space”, an alternative consideration of the theory and practice of age‐segmentation is presented.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Marsha A. Dickson, Sharron J. Lennon, Catherine P. Montalto, Dong Shen and Li Zhang

A consumer survey of a probability sample of 1,628 married adult consumers residing in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shanghai, China was used obtain basic knowledge on market

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11309

Abstract

A consumer survey of a probability sample of 1,628 married adult consumers residing in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shanghai, China was used obtain basic knowledge on market segments of Chinese consumers with the potential to buy foreign apparel. The paper used conjoint analysis to identify the product attributes salient to consumers' apparel purchase intentions. With cluster, multiple regression, and other statistical analyses, six market segments prioritizing similar product attributes were identified and profiled. The six market segments were then described by their demographic and geographic characteristics, apparel expenditures, and perceptions of US‐made pants. Suggestions are provided for apparel marketers wishing to pursue two especially promising market segments with the potential to buy US‐made and US brand apparel.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Sung J. Shim and Arun Kumar

Examines the selection and diversification of market segments for robotics products with respect to application areas and customer sectors.

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1083

Abstract

Purpose

Examines the selection and diversification of market segments for robotics products with respect to application areas and customer sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study attempted to investigate the selection and diversification of market segments by 50 robotics firms in the US with respect to application areas and customer sectors that they serve. Based upon the concept of strategic groups, we classified those robotics firms into three distinct strategic groups along the dimensions of application area diversification and customer sector diversification. The three strategic groups were identified as high, moderate, and low diversification groups, with respect to both application areas and customer sectors.

Findings

The results show that robotics firms vary in their selection of application areas and customer sectors, and more importantly in the degree of diversification of application areas and customer sectors. Also, three distinct strategic groups are observed among them, based upon the degree of diversification of application areas and customer sectors.

Research limitations/implications

A few limitations are recognized in this study. First, we used only the dimensions of market segment diversification in classifying the strategic groups in the US robotics industry. Given the important role of technology in the industry, we may consider pairing market dimensions with technology dimensions in exploring any strategic groups in the industry. Second, we only tested for the existence of strategic groups in the industry. We may further consider investigating the factors or reasons for the differences between the strategic groups, as well as any performance differences between the strategic groups. In studying the firm's performance, it is desirable to utilize financial performance measures such as sales growth and profitability. But securing such financial performance measures for individual robotics firms is hampered by the consolidated financial results of diversified firms and the presence of privately held firms in the industry. Third, we used data compiled from a secondary source. We may consider collecting time‐series data directly from robotics firms. These limitations are not certainly exhaustive but rather important ones for future research.

Practical implications

Given the limited studies on robotics firms and their strategy, the results should be of interest to those who formulate product strategy in the robotics market.

Originality/value

The issues of diversification of market segments and the resultant strategic groups that we examined are well worth trying to understand for more viable market strategy in the field. Particularly, the identification of such strategic groups in the industry would help robotics firms evaluate their competitive positions, as well as competitors' approach to the market place.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2004

Hans-Peter Burghof and Adrian Hunger

In this chapter, we describe the rise and fall of Germany’s Neuer Markt from its promising start to its ultimate failure. We show that the Neuer Markt was designed to…

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe the rise and fall of Germany’s Neuer Markt from its promising start to its ultimate failure. We show that the Neuer Markt was designed to serve the special needs of small and medium sized growth firms. However, some regulatory flaws, insufficient means to enforce the rules, the IPO frenzy and the bursting of the stock market bubble destroyed its reputation beyond recovery. The closing of the Neuer Markt and the rebranding and restructuring of the entire Frankfurt stock market indicate the seriousness of the crisis of German public equity markets.

Details

The Rise and Fall of Europe's New Stock Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-137-8

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Chung-Shing Chan and Lawal M. Marafa

This chapter explores the concept of branding in a contemporary competitive arena of places. The multi-dimensional interpretations of places offer a variety of…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of branding in a contemporary competitive arena of places. The multi-dimensional interpretations of places offer a variety of possibilities to better understand the true essence of destination branding. One of the common interpretations of places is through the study of their images, as destination branding requires a thorough understanding of destination image. The important foundation and relation of destination image are specified and explained. The notion of destination branding has evolved from the fields of marketing and urban studies and has become a cross-disciplinary research area. Thus, the researchers explain that destination branding as well as ‘place branding’ are dynamic concepts that are being continuously being explored in academia for the benefit of practitioners in travel and tourism. This chapter suggests that the use of brand equity is also one of the frontier areas of study in ‘place branding’ as it emphasises the need to thematise destinations (e.g. for their historical heritage, cultural value, natural attractions, etc.) and places for residence (e.g. as green cities, creative cities, smart cities, etc.).

Details

The Branding of Tourist Destinations: Theoretical and Empirical Insights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-373-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

John T. Bowen

Reviews hospitality research relating to the themes of business development and service improvement. Relates this to five sub‐theme areas: market sensitivity and…

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9138

Abstract

Reviews hospitality research relating to the themes of business development and service improvement. Relates this to five sub‐theme areas: market sensitivity and competitiveness; segmentation; branding and service customization; service quality and customer retention; product design and internal marketing.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Yvonne J. Moogan

Issues such as managing brand image, assessing advertising medium effectiveness and collecting market intelligence are common practice for higher education institutions…

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6621

Abstract

Purpose

Issues such as managing brand image, assessing advertising medium effectiveness and collecting market intelligence are common practice for higher education institutions (HEIs). Consequently, understanding the information needs of potential students to the HEI when they make their decisions is paramount. The aim of this survey is to analyse the decision‐making criteria of new undergraduates enrolling at a UK HEI on their first day in terms of marketing activities employed throughout the decision‐making period during their last 12 months. Focusing in particular on the effectiveness of the dissemination of information with the influences on their decisions of whether or not to keep this HEI in their preferred set and to enrol (purchase) will be investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was designed to establish the key marketing communication activities that contribute to the student decision‐making process. A survey of 318 students enrolling on their first day at a Welsh (traditional) university was achieved from a sampling frame of 469. In order to supplement the literature, four semi structured in‐depth interviews with university staff (the School Manager, School Admissions Tutor, Head of Central Marketing, and Head of Central Recruitment) were also held. These interviews identified the key marketing communication themes (information sources with the application of new technologies in disseminating information during the decision‐making period) that acted as the foundation for the questionnaire. The respondents were asked to consider each phase of the decision‐making process and rank the information sources that had the most impact upon them. Hence a critical incident approach was employed.

Findings

The results show that the respondents did receive adequate information, with details of the programme of study being most important, but they would have preferred greater use of electronic sources and especially from current undergraduates on a regular basis. If the HE senior management knows the impact in terms of the timing and content of marketing activities on potential HE students, there is a better chance of matching the information sources to the needs of the students.

Originality/value

HEIs can do more for potential HE students by trying to offer the most relevant information that will satisfy each of their information needs. It is beneficial for all parties concerned that potential students are better informed and prepared to make those decisions. This is especially true as potential students are frequently young and living at home, planning to consume this “good experience” over a relatively long period of time, and the financial risks with opportunity costs involved are substantial. By addressing potential students' concerns and offering more “tailor‐made” communication strategies to suit them, HEIs can easily segment the market place and then position themselves within the competitive environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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